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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rick's bandsaw issue needs a thread of it's own...too tough to find the comments in the Random thread.

So to simplify, it's brand new and isn't cutting perfectly perpendicular on a cutoff cut...Rick says it's out by at least a 1/16" in 4".
OK; I just walked with my machinist neighbour and his immediate reaction when I explained the problem was that in all likelihood there's nothing wrong with the machine. He suspects one or more of the following:
1)...the guides aren't adjusted correctly. He says those adjustments are critical.
2)...the blade isn't correctly tensioned
3)...the downward pressure during the cut is also critical; too much pressure and it'll do exactly what Rick's experiencing.
Don't shoot the messenger...I'm just passing on what he said.
Hopefully someone here has hands on experience and can advise you, Rick.
 

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stock isn't square...
is/are the cuts being measured only and the stockdrop not being checked for square cut
 
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Yeah, if you force the feed, the blade will bow outward during the cut. This is made worse if the tension is wrong. Fed too fast, the lower part of the blade is dragging through the wood. But at the top of the cut, the blade has far less friction so it will gradually begin bowing, just about the amount Rick has experienced. Feed rate

Also, the table needs to be set 90 to the blade (while it's under tension). Then there is the two cut test. Run a piece sideways into the blade and make a shallow cut. Flip the piece and see if the back of the blade fits in the slot. If it's off, depending on the model, I'd adjust the table so the blade and cut line up. A band saw isn't like a table saw. Every time you change a blade, reset tension, the saw is going to behave slightly differently. One reason for ordering Timber Wolf blades (or any premium brand blade) is their welds are more accurate and consistent.

I love using my band saws. The Laguna 14/12 for resawing and heavier duty cuts, and a 12 inch Ricon for light duty in the shop. The little saw gets premium blades too. Mostly Timber Wolf since they're so easy to get online. The 14/12 has Laguna's premium blades for now, but when they give up the ghost, I'll likely buy Timber Wolves to replace them.

I probably enjoy using a band saw only slightly less than my table saw. But the band saw is sometimes great fun to use.
 

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Ok the saw goes down crooked . This is regardless of whether it’s running or not running . Here’s a few pics.

In the first pic you can see a 5” square in the vise . This is sitting flat on the base , and I have tried three different squares with the same outcome .

Pic two is where the rod is for the pivot point , which in my opinion, is the only way to correct it from going down crooked . If the saddle where the main rod was reamed out so the pin could be located a little lower , I suspect it would let it fall vertically.

Pic three is a close up of the square in the vise . You can see that the blade is not sitting flush to the square . Sorry it’s not a great pic to describe the distance , but theres about a 1/16” to 1/8” gap .
Now as I lift the saw , it hits the top of the square .
This kinda sums it up.

I did sort of notice something though , but not 100% sure.
When the saw is raised and held by hand so that the hydraulic ram has no pressure on the main arm , I thought that the gap increased at the top of the square , close to the distance it’s out at the bottom .
Meaning the weight of the arm on the ram which is located on the front side , may be influencing the gap .
But , if there was any play , why would it not influence the arm the same threw the entire stroke , as it has pressure on it during the entire drop?
 

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Sorry Rick, I forgot its a portable model. Any play in the bearings? Is the tensioning adjustment solid? If it has them, are the tires OK. Sounds defective to me. Don't know what the ram is.
 

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Sorry Rick, I forgot its a portable model. Any play in the bearings? Is the tensioning adjustment solid? If it has them, are the tires OK. Sounds defective to me. Don't know what the ram is.
Tom ,the ram is that black cylinder on the right hand side . You adjust it in order to set the cutting speed .
Personally I think this saw is basically a flawed design . I would have had the hydraulic ram mounted in the middle of swing arm somehow .
I have noticed the ram is mounted at a steeper angle on some other models . It’s unfortunate they didn’t have one of Generals upper models there, as I believe I wouldn’t have these issues .

As far as welding is concerned , having material not perfectly straight can be made up by the welds , but it makes it harder to clamp pieces together, as your fighting the objective of having every5h8ng square .
If I was to use this bandsaw for cutting T-slot extruded aluminum for a cnc router table , I’d be in a world of hurt though
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Rick; I can not believe there''s no adjustment for truing up the cut to perpendicular. You have any machinist or millwright buds? This sounds like a case of not enough information. Was the saw assembled for shipping to Canada, or did they do that here (Calgary) or maybe at the MAGNUM distribution centre?
There must be a more detailed maintenance manual than what came to you with the saw(?).
 

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Don't do metal, so I can't help. I can commiserate though. That must be highly frustrating. Hope someone on here can help. Though it's a PITA, maybe a trip to the seller is in the cards.
 

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The project sounds like one that you could use a metal chop saw to make. That would be more likely to deliver a square cut. Don't think a woodworking saw would like all those metal shavings, even though you had the right kind of blade.
 

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). Mostly Timber Wolf since they're so easy to get online. The 14/12 has Laguna's premium blades for now, but when they give up the ghost, I'll likely buy Timber Wolves to replace them.
I did a review on YouTube on the Timber wolf vs. the Wood slicer. It was a no contest. The Timber Wolf was so slow compared to the Wood Slicer that it was embarrassing. There is another video where the guy did a speed cutting test with the Timber Wolf straight out of the package. He then sharpened the new bade and tested the speed again. Bottom line to get the best result from a Timber Wolf you need to sharpen it. The other thing I don't like about Timber Wolf is their convoluted way of having to adjust them for flutter.
 

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The project sounds like one that you could use a metal chop saw to make. That would be more likely to deliver a square cut. Don't think a woodworking saw would like all those metal shavings, even though you had the right kind of blade.
Yes Tom I am kicking myself . My Makita chop saw was terrible , it’s the style with the ceramic wheel I think it’s called that throws sparks everywhere and wears down on a few cuts .
So my first idea was to buy a cold cut chop saw , which I really wish I did . The reviews on the cold cut ones were not great , but would probably have been more accurate and cost half as much . Plus not got in my way .
A guy a work commended me on not spending more on a General. Well that certainly backfired on me .
I can put a piece of metal under one end of the bed to raise the material up to make it cut straight I guess .

And there are no adjustments for it where it pivots . That would have solved everything .
Get it machined out where the main pin is located for the hinge and have a concentric bushing put in that can be spun to right it ?
 

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Rick,
you said it, add a shim and just cut. These saws were not designed for great accuracy, as you stated if it's off a bit you can compensate with the weld. I would compare this with construction, you have rough carpentry framing and you have fine woodworking trim installers. If you want precision in metal working, machine shops and their various machines will do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The saw HAS to be adjustable to make angle cuts, so how does the engineering allow for trueing those up? Building a saw that won't do accurate 45's makes no sense at all. 1/16" off on each face of two mating 45's is now an 1/8". Rick suggested that it could be as much as 1/8" on each face...that's a 1/4" off angle!
Rick; you need a competent millwright to look at that machine (or machinist).
 

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The saw HAS to be adjustable to make angle cuts, so how does the engineering allow for trueing those up? Building a saw that won't do accurate 45's makes no sense at all. 1/16" off on each face of two mating 45's is now an 1/8". Rick suggested that it could be as much as 1/8" on each face...that's a 1/4" off angle!
Rick; you need a competent millwright to look at that machine (or machinist).
The vise rotates to make angle cuts
 

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