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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
They actually make a right angle router ran by air but they are only 1/4". I figure that a rigged up right angle grinder (electric) somehow can have a 1/2" collet attached safely somehow?

Any ideas are welcome. I want the router which will be heavily used in a small space (7 Inches) cutting 3/8-7/16 OSB.
 

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My mind is stuck on: Why a router bit? (and what profile) Small Space, OSB less than 1/2".
There's gotta be a better way.
and, #2 = what do you consider "heavily used" ? Photos, photos and more photos could tell us "The Rest of the Story".
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My mind is stuck on: WHY a router bit? (and what profile) Small Space, OSB less than 1/2".
There's gotta be a better way.
and, #2 = what do you consider "heavily used" ? Photos, photos and more photos could tell us "The Rest of the Story".
It is to be used for Modular Home Manufacturing's OSB sheathing on its exterior using a router to route out the frames of its doors, windows etc..Daily use would be 60 windows and a dozen doors which eliminates using a die grinder with a 1/4 inch bit as you would be wasting time changing bits through out the day. Currently they are using a saws-all which works but takes longer and looks rough. The bit is a Panel Router Bit perfect for the process but a full sized router will not fit all the way up the cut. It is blocked by a catwalk. The catwalk will not move outward and the frames covered by the OSB must be cut in that location. And using two separate tools for one job (router and saws-all) won't be done. It's one or the other and preferably the other
 

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aaahhhhh okay - gotcha.
for starters, with that much to do, I would have a few "custom made" bits made that will get the most mileage out of the OSB. The bit you show is for plastic laminates and will not last more than 20 feet in OSB. A custom 1/2" bit with 3 carbide flutes would give you the most mileage for your buck.
I have an old 7" B&D angle grinder with some hefty horsepower and torque. It has like a 3/4" threaded head that turns clockwise. I have no idea how you could get a router chuck on it. And no, the pneumatic 1/4" die grinder isn't the answer.
I hope you can find the one you need.
 

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could you use a full size hand-held router for 90-95% of the cutting and then a smaller tool for the parts where the full size router won't fit ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
aaahhhhh okay - gotcha.
for starters, with that much to do, I would have a few "custom made" bits made that will get the most mileage out of the OSB. The bit you show is for plastic laminates and will not last more than 20 feet in OSB. A custom 1/2" bit with 3 carbide flutes would give you the most mileage for your buck.
I have an old 7" B&D angle grinder with some hefty horsepower and torque. It has like a 3/4" threaded head that turns clockwise. I have no idea how you could get a router chuck on it. And no, the pneumatic 1/4" die grinder isn't the answer.
I hope you can find the one you need.
The bit used for the OSB is not the one linked they use an inexpensive HSS bit due to the OSB and metal fasteners and they get them sharpened a time or 2 when possible. Where's Macgyver when you need him? I'm sure he would rig something up with a paper clip, rubber band and duct tape! :)
 

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I've had two shed built using routers as cutters to trim the edges of sheet goods already installed on the shed, and to cut window oenings that had been framed in. He used an old router with a simple bit with one cutting edge. Worked great. It was not a spiral bit. And he didn't drill a start hole, he just pressed it in. It was steel and he just tossed it when it finally got too dull to cut smoothly, and that not too often. It looked a lot like this Rockler bit, but was shorter. Has to be in a catalog somewhere
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Or like this laminate trim bit, but I recall it had a much longer cutting edge.
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I don't have any catalogs for bits anymore,so if someone recognizes this, perhaps you can post it.

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
........ may have found who Macgyver is working for. They have an adapter for the right angle grinder that would still need some modification to accept a 1/2" shank router bit. I contacted them and quizzed them about if it was possible to use their spindle collet adapter modified.
 

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They actually make a right angle router ran by air but they are only 1/4". I figure that a rigged up right angle grinder (electric) somehow can have a 1/2" collet attached safely somehow?

Any ideas are welcome. I want the router which will be heavily used in a small space (7 Inches) cutting 3/8-7/16 OSB.
It is to be used for Modular Home Manufacturing's OSB sheathing on its exterior using a router to route out the frames of its doors, windows etc..Daily use would be 60 windows and a dozen doors which eliminates using a die grinder with a 1/4 inch bit as you would be wasting time changing bits through out the day. Currently they are using a saws-all which works but takes longer and looks rough. The bit is a Panel Router Bit perfect for the process but a full sized router will not fit all the way up the cut. It is blocked by a catwalk. The catwalk will not move outward and the frames covered by the OSB must be cut in that location. And using two separate tools for one job (router and saws-all) won't be done. It's one or the other and preferably the other
I found ER20 collet adapters on Ebay for less than $20. ER20 collets are available from about 1/8" up to 1/2" bore and are very cheap also. Buy an adapter made for a 1/2" spindle, bore and tap it for 5/8-11NC threads (most common spindle thread), get whatever collet you need to fit your bit (the hard part), and your in Biz. I threaded one on my lathe to fit a 5/8"x18 NF spindle on a universal table saw motor that I used on a slot mortiser. It works great.
 
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