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Discussion Starter #1
hi all,
this is my take of the rip snorter adjustable push block, where you can find all the details on Shopmade Rip-Snorter Push Block - by DeLayne Peck @ LumberJocks.com ~ woodworking community, it was made by dewayne peck and is obviously a variant of the GRRipper push block system that they all rave about in the states.
its pretty straight forward to make and does work surprisingly well.
its the only push block i think ill be needing from now on in.

note: the only drawback with this and of course the GRRipper is that as you push through the blade, your wrist is above the blade
as you go through, but as in all actions around the table saw, you just have to be carefull and concentrate on what your doing.
i for one find it excellent, thanks dewayne.

cheers

chris.......
 

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As a wooden copy of a GRR-Ripper it's a fair job, but really, let's face it, it just isn't a GRR-Ripper!
 

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As a wooden copy of a GRR-Ripper it's a fair job, but really, let's face it, it just isn't a GRR-Ripper!
hi harry,
thanks for commenting on my push block,
whats your feeling of the grripper with your wrist going above the blade during the cut.

cheers
chris....
 

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Chris, with your jig or the Grr-Ripper your hand is safely above the blade and no way to contact it. Because your fingers are holding the handle should a kick back occur (highly unlikely) your hand would be pulled away from the blade.

I appreciate your efforts and those of Dewayne in trying to build a home version but the router mat material used does not have nearly the holding power of the green grip material. Do you really want to cut corners when it comes to protecting your fingers and expensive materials? Food for thought.
 

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Theo
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I go along with Harry and Mike on this.
 

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Good replica of a great safety device. I don't see a safety hazard using the Rip-Snorter when like anything around a spinning blade used with caution.
 

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I have been holding off on commenting on this for personal reasons but it's time to make a statement. There is not a darn thing wrong with this build, except the choice of router/sanding mat used as the gripping material. Drywall sanding paper would have been a much better choice, it will even out perform and outlast even the material used on the Gripper. Rather than do without a safety device this man has chosen to build one that will serve the same purpose. I don't think his efforts should be downplayed because it is not the overly priced commercial product. I may even build one myself, but that is not my way of ripping thin stock. But that's just my 2c worth! Sorry bout that folks but I have to keep my mind occupied somehow.
 

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Spot on......

I have been holding off on commenting on this for personal reasons but it's time to make a statement. There is not a darn thing wrong with this build, except the choice of router/sanding mat used as the gripping material. Drywall sanding paper would have been a much better choice, it will even out perform and outlast even the material used on the Gripper. Rather than do without a safety device this man has chosen to build one that will serve the same purpose. I don't think his efforts should be downplayed because it is not the overly priced commercial product. I may even build one myself, but that is not my way of ripping thin stock. But that's just my 2c worth! Sorry bout that folks but I have to keep my mind occupied somehow.

Here, here ( as the English would say)....:yes4:
 

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Chris, anything that improves safety is well worth the effort! Good job!
 

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Dick, I have to disagree with you on sand paper working better. I have tried both and compared them and the green grip material holds much better. I can't answer for longevity yet only having had my Grr-Rippers for a few months. I believe in giving credit where credit is due and any safety device is a good idea.

Chris, if you felt in any way I was making negative comments about your push stick that is not the case... it is a good idea. I do believe the Grr-Ripper is a better choice because of it's ease of adjustment and holding power.
 

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As an inventor, I am offended when someone produces something such as this. Here is why...The GRRipper is well-designed and well executed and is made from quality materials and certainly has to be OSHA Compliant. I do not yet own the GRRiper, do plan to add some, but am not 100% sold on it, either. My table saw has an overhead blade guard and a fin (splitter) beyond the blade - if I could only use one of those - it would be the splitter. Neither of my current table saw safety devices would allow for the GRRipper (or this home-made Rip-Snorter "safety device") to be concurrently employed.

Just last week, I was cutting some very heavy low quality oak lumber that had been salvaged (by me) from some heavy industrial pallets... I had the bevel set at 15* and was making 3" deep through-cuts. My intention was to bevel one long board and then cut several segments of the tapered workpiece into prescribed lengths. The leading edge of the board had a small knot, and for some reason; the board split while being sawn and a piece of oak, about 6" long (with said knot) became "on its own" and flew back - hitting me flatly on my chest. I now have some very odd-looking bruises that are quite tender and I will forever be mindful of this potential hazard. I still know of no safety device that would have served to prevent this particular mishap. Bullet-proof vest?

Looking back, I think that the pallet had been fabricated from "green lumber" and was so solidly nailed to other perpendicular members that it had been restrained from twisting and my cut must have removed enough adjacent wood to relieve that stress. This sudden lesson will stay with me forever - I was very fortunate that the pointed end of the flying part had not "harpooned" me.

Back to inventions being copied...I spent $2.5 million on developing my product line before selling the first one to a customer. I did not want to hastily sell a product that could potentially give me a bad reputation. My coworkers even often joked that I would not introduce my product until it could be assembled by drunk monkeys in a dark room! There was, in my mind; far too much at risk for me to gamble my reputation.

Unfortunately, when one owns a patent (such as I and many others do), it is not protected by the government - it simply allows the patent holder to POLICE what hits the market that may be an infringement on my, his or her patent. I think this "Rip-Snorter" is a cheap way to copy something that someone spent hundreds, maybe thousands of man hours to develop and market. Now, thinking back on my suddenly-split lumber scenario: What is going to happen when that (turned-wrongly) piece of solid wood splits? Answer: Someone is going to lose a finger, or two. At the very least, that top board should be plywood - but the whole think is just a cheap fake, and this makes inventors (such as me want to go "hug a toilet").

...and one other thing, If someone gets hurt using this cheap, piece of crap, they best not go to their insurance company company or they will get laughed at all the way to a hospital!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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As an inventor, I am offended when someone produces something such as this. Here is why...The GRRipper is well-designed and well executed and is made from quality materials and certainly has to be OSHA Compliant. I do not yet own the GRRiper, do plan to add some, but am not 100% sold on it, either. My table saw has an overhead blade guard and a fin (splitter) beyond the blade - if I could only use one of those - it would be the splitter. Neither of my current table saw safety devices would allow for the GRRipper (or this home-made Rip-Snorter "safety device") to be concurrently employed.

Just last week, I was cutting some very heavy low quality oak lumber that had been salvaged (by me) from some heavy industrial pallets... I had the bevel set at 15* and was making 3" deep through-cuts. My intention was to bevel one long board and then cut several segments of the tapered workpiece into prescribed lengths. The leading edge of the board had a small knot, and for some reason; the board split while being sawn and a piece of oak, about 6" long (with said knot) became "on its own" and flew back - hitting me flatly on my chest. I now have some very odd-looking bruises that are quite tender and I will forever be mindful of this potential hazard. I still know of no safety device that would have served to prevent this particular mishap. Bullet-proof vest?

Looking back, I think that the pallet had been fabricated from "green lumber" and was so solidly nailed to other perpendicular members that it had been restrained from twisting and my cut must have removed enough adjacent wood to relieve that stress. This sudden lesson will stay with me forever - I was very fortunate that the pointed end of the flying part had not "harpooned" me.

Back to inventions being copied...I spent $2.5 million on developing my product line before selling the first one to a customer. I did not want to hastily sell a product that could potentially give me a bad reputation. My coworkers even often joked that I would not introduce my product until it could be assembled by drunk monkeys in a dark room! There was, in my mind; far too much at risk for me to gamble my reputation.

Unfortunately, when one owns a patent (such as I and many others do), it is not protected by the government - it simply allows the patent holder to POLICE what hits the market that may be an infringement on my, his or her patent. I think this "Rip-Snorter" is a cheap way to copy something that someone spent hundreds, maybe thousands of man hours to develop and market. Now, thinking back on my suddenly-split lumber scenario: What is going to happen when that (turned-wrongly) piece of solid wood splits? Answer: Someone is going to lose a finger, or two. At the very least, that top board should be plywood - but the whole think is just a cheap fake, and this makes inventors (such as me want to go "hug a toilet").

...and one other thing, If someone gets hurt using this cheap, piece of crap, they best not go to their insurance company company or they will get laughed at all the way to a hospital!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
Hi there,
I'm the one who, as you put it, made this piece of crap,
All I can say is, GET OVER YOURSELF MATE, U MIGHT HAVE A HEART ATTACK.
Cheers for your crap,comments......
 

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John
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Otis
Micro-jig makes a splitter to use with the gripper
 

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Cool John, Thank you for that info - I was unaware of that. Looks like I "ruffled some feathers". In addition to the reply from the original poster, I got a private message from a friend and fellow member concerned that I did not "respect" the original poster. True, I did not. When someone has been down the roads that I've been down, they might better see or understand "where I am/was coming from". I make no apologies for my comments. The subject (Rip Snorter) is a wooden copy of a manufactured product that comes from a respected tool maker. It has stood the test of time. It is made from high-quality materials engineered to perform well. It was even featured as a topic for discussion recently in, "how much would you pay to keep all of your fingers?" The product got favorable comments from many posters, and it was also mentioned that it is expensive. Good products are often "expensive", but compared to what?

Many people want to make their own copies of a manufactured product, when they do this for their own use, it is not illegal. If they were to sell their "copy", it is illegal and, as I've stated earlier - it gets "policed" by the patent holder or owner. It can also get "policed" by the manufacturer or a distributor, but the only potential prosecutor is the patent's owner. Making one's own copy of something and then publishing how someone did it is truly in a "gray area" of the law.

The photos included by the original poster show a very clear shot of a board that could easily split and allow one's finger(s) to be lost! Everything about that board encourages it to split in the manner I have described! If my harshness saves some finger(s) then I am okay with that. Just because "we're all friends" (was in the PM that I received) I AM NOT OKAY WITH SOMEONE DOING SOMETHING DANGEROUS... and that "gray area" offends me as an inventor who has spent a lot of everything on developing a good, solid reputation.

And yes, I could have a heart attack!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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Theo
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The leading edge of the board had a small knot, and for some reason; the board split while being sawn and a piece of oak, about 6" long (with said knot) became "on its own" and flew back - hitting me flatly on my chest.
I always tell people, do not stand behind the saw blade. Stand to one side. Then if this does happen, it misses you. My high school shop teacher told us that back in about 1953/4. Then he demonstarted what happens with kickback. I was very impressed, and have remembered that all these years.
 

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I had a kick back in my workshop years ago and still have a hole in the paneling there. Thank god I was standing to the side and it missed me, left the hole in the paneling as a reminder. :)
 

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Actually you are right! But I was standing to the side when this happened! I try to never have any part of me between the slots and I was to the left of the left side slot when this happened. In hindsight, it had to be that it was twisted wood that got suddenly relieved of stress, sprung into the blade and hit me very hard. I was using a good commercial push stick, splitter, clear guard and feather board. I have never seen anything like this before and that covers a lot of table saw work done safely. It was just weird as far as I can tell.. You can certainly bet that I'll be a bit more choosey when ripping heavy boards in the future.

Otis (the feather ruffler)
 

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Hi there,
I'm the one who, as you put it, made this piece of crap,
All I can say is, GET OVER YOURSELF MATE, U MIGHT HAVE A HEART ATTACK.
Cheers for your crap,comments......
Chris, what you designed is a fairly decent tool. However, it is a fairly blatant ripoff of the grr-ripper design. Although Otis may have been a bit harsh in his criticism, I can see where he is coming from. If I had patents to protect I would be very resentful of what you are doing too. I checked the grr-ripper website and while the name is copy righted I did not see anything about patents. So you may be safe Chris. However, if there are patents in place you could be at risk of being sued by the company that makes the grr-ripper. This is one of those things where it is okay to rip-off a copy for yourself but it is something that you should not broadcast to the rest of the world.

It is possible that one of the moderation team should have stepped in at the beginning and ended this thread quickly. I've seen them do it where copy righted material was posted for free distribution. However, they are only human and I don't envy them for the task they have taken on but I will contact them and suggest that this be removed.
 

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I don't think Otis read the whole post, and realized the man that made the thing "that they all rave about in the states" is in the UK and probably has no access to the Gripper. But I do understand the point he is trying to make about rip-offs. Harbor Freight will probably be releasing their model shortly. I would be much more concerned about that than what someone put together in their shop, for their own safety. Like Otis I also noticed the wood grain being turned the wrong way. There is no patent or copyright protection for building anything for your own personal use, as soon as you start selling them, or the plans to build it, then you have broken the law.
 
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