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I'm going to be ripping about 150bf of 2" thick Figured Maple. Will a 24 tooth rip blade give me the best cut? I have a gp blade right now, but the better the cut I can get the better off I am.

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I'm going to be ripping about 150bf of 2" thick Figured Maple. Will a 24 tooth rip blade give me the best cut? I have a gp blade right now, but the better the cut I can get the better off I am.

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you know that rip blades are thickness rated....
this one is major impressive... I like it a lot...
Freud Tools | 10" Heavy-Duty Rip Blade
this one isn't shabby either...
Freud Tools | 10" Heavy-Duty Rip Blade

it's counter part for thinner material....
Freud Tools | 10" Glue Line Ripping Blade
Freud Tools | 10" Industrial Thin Kerf Glue Line Ripping Blade
 

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Ripping a full 2 inch with your saw will work it. If it's dressed to 1.5" it won't be so bad if you were to use a full kerf blade. I have a full kerf 24 tooth Freud Industrial glue line blade and when I get up to 2.5- 3" cuts it makes my 3hp saw start working. You can get a really good cut with a thin rim 24 tooth blade if it is good and sharp. I also use the Diablo 24T D1024 (thin rim) blade and it makes very good cuts. If you coupled it with some blade stabilizer discs then I would say that the results could be glue line quality. I originally bought my stabilizer discs to improve miter cuts, and they did improve that from unacceptable to pretty good. But they will also improve rip cuts. The one drawback to using them is that you may need to make another blade insert for the saw table as the stabilizer will move the blade location over more if the original inside blade washer on your saw is fixed to the arbor and not removable.
 
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I wouldn't rip to final dimension either, if you need truly straight boards.

I like @Stick486 's choices for blades. Use the full kerf plades when ripping thick material and give the blade a chance to cool frequently. Freud makes good blades, reasonably priced, and easily available, at least in the USA.

For truly straight boards -

Rip them close to dimension, leaving about 1/4" extra width in each piece. Then come back in a few days and joint one edge. Then rip them to final width plus a little placing this jointed edge against the fence, leaving just enough extra over the final dimension to allow jointing this second edge, to finally reach the desired dimension.

You haven't said if the surfaces are rough sawn, or planned, but if rough sawn and you also want the wide surfaces of the boards flat, smooth,straight and parallel there is another similar sequence that needs to be followed for those sides, and the steps need to be meshed with the above, so you start from one corner, getting one surface and one edge flat and at right angle to each other and then working in both directions from there, again cutting to an oversize dimension, then letting the boards settle a few days before finishing them.

Edit - You will have a very tough time getting good results on your 1.5 hp saw. Thin kerf blades will help, but as they heat up, they don't always cut perfectly straight. If your saw is a Delta contractor saw and you switch the motor to 240 volts and connect it to a 240 volt circuit you will get a full 2 hp from that original motor. This will make a big difference when trying to rip thick material

Charley
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Anything over 1 1/2" thick I rip on the band saw and then use the jointer to finish the edge.
Herb
That depends on his bandsaw and how long the pieces are, Herb. Same restrictions apply as in the table saw - sufficient HP and blade capacity to handle that sort of stock for anything more than a short cut. Most hobby shop bandsaws won't handle 150 bd. ft. in one setting; likely to burn it up. 150 bd. ft. would have to be spread over a long time. It does reward you with a thinner kerf if you cut straight enough but it's a wash if you have to cut very much on the jointer (hard to manage a straight line if these boards are 8' long and there's any blade drift).

Now, on to the more important questions - what do you plan to make with all this figured Maple, where did you get it, and at what price? Are you wanting to rip it for easier handling now or to a specific width for a project? I just love figured Maple!!

David
 

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Well hell...

Maybe I'll have them rip it for me. My little 1.5hp might not be able to handle that

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two passes with a better blade...
set the depth at a fuzz more than 50% and rip,,,
flip the blade end for end and complete the cut through...
 

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1.5hp should do it with a good sharp blade. You may have to feed a little slower. As I said, I've had very good performance from a Diablo D1024 thin rip and I've seen them here for $38-40 so you may find one a bit cheaper. One rule to remember is that more teeth require more power. They also generate more heat and feed slower. If you are doing heavy ripping with 1.5hp then you don't have a choice. Thin rim and few teeth.
 
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I've cut my fair share of full 2"+ sugar maple on my 1 1/2" hp saw without much trouble using a full kerf Freud. The thing to avoid is the binding up of the blade due to imperfections of the board. I've come to learn that at least on my saw, that twists and bowed edges, particularly the edge riding the fence will cause problems. A dead straight reference edge and a flat bottom you should be golden. Feed the stock at a rate your saw can handle. Listen to your saw, if it starts to labor look to why. If everything looks to be good, then its time for plan "B".
 

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I haven't posted in a long time guys, so I guess I'll jump back in and comment on something I do everyday. I buy lumber in the rough and process it in my shop.

If I didn't have a 3HP saw I might pay to have the wood straight line ripped and at minimum skip planed(even though I have a nice 5hp planer). Even better have them straight line rip one edge to within 1/2" or so of every width you need.

Unlike some I dont think 150 bd foot is much wood. Heck that's only 9 or 10 - 2x10x8 sticks. My Grizzly Bandsaw would eat that for breakfast even if I were resawing 11" wide pieces on edge, just ripping the 2" thickness for 150 bd feet wouldn't even heat up the motor. Same for my 3HP cabinet saw. Even my 1.75 hybrid could rip it on one 2" pass with little trouble. I never rip for final use on my bandsaw though, the table saw gives me so much better glue type edges. Sometimes no jointing required at all if I use the table saw. The Bandsaws are the center of my shop, in most shops the table saw is the main centerpiece. So I don't say that lightly.

I could even cut that with my DeWalt 7491 bench top, but with that little universal motor I might not bother. I would probably just pay the .15 a linear foot to have the boards straight line ripped to 1/2" of each width I needed. Processing wood only saves money if you go though a lot of lumber, otherwise your time, blades and tools are well worth the pre-processing fees(straight line ripping and skip planing).

You really didn't say what the end size of the lumber needs be and what you are using the wood for, that all comes in to play.

To answer you exact question though, yes a 24" tooth IMHO, is by far the best, sometimes a 30 tooth if it's a top rated blade. I think you will find most of the glue rip and general rip blades are 24 to 30 tooth. Google for yourself, you are going to find the best of the best user rated rip blades for the most part dont have more than 30 teeth. For me if I was going to use my DeWalt or any table top I wouldn't even consider anything more than 24 tooth for that particular batch of processing(150 bd ft 2" hard maple at one sitting).
 

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"If your saw is a Delta contractor saw and you switch the motor to 240 volts and connect it to a 240 volt circuit you will get a full 2 hp from that original motor. This will make a big difference when trying to rip thick material

-Charley
First thing I did with mine.
I know I get more torque, but I didn't realize that actually equated with an increase in HP. To be honest, never really thought about it in those terms.
That probably sounds wrong, but the armature gets a kick every 120th of a second instead of every 60th...just assumed it meant the blade had less opportunity to slow down.
Physics was never my long suite.
 

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"If your saw is a Delta contractor saw and you switch the motor to 240 volts and connect it to a 240 volt circuit you will get a full 2 hp from that original motor. This will make a big difference when trying to rip thick material

-Charley
First thing I did with mine.
I know I get more torque, but I didn't realize that actually equated with an increase in HP. To be honest, never really thought about it in those terms.
That probably sounds wrong, but the armature gets a kick every 120th of a second instead of every 60th...just assumed it meant the blade had less opportunity to slow down.
Physics was never my long suite.
Because it doesn't increase the HP. Unless that's some one in a thousand motor I never heard of, simply changing 120 to 240 does exactly zero to increase power. At best you might run the motor cooler.

I am not perfect and I am willing to read about something new and learn something every day so if someone can show me the specification on this motor from the manufacture that explains this how this increase in HP works that's great. Until then nope going to from 120 to 240V never increases actual power. It never has in any any motor I have, but again I m wiling to take a look at a motor like this and test it in my shop. I'll do test cuts and test current draw under both 120 and 240 conditions and see for myself. If these tests already exists showing the HP increase I'll love to read that paper and learn something new.

We can start a different thread on 110 to 220 conversions because I fear this can blow up this thread.
 
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