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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of trays to make for a cabinet, plus an upcoming project will need 12 shallow drawers, and I'm looking for a quick and easy way to make them. I have the above bit http://www.rockler.com/drawer-lock-router-bit?sid=V9146?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PL&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI5uD_vfqt2gIVyx6GCh07awMKEAQYAiABEgLPYfD_BwE and was wondering if anyone had used one recently and can answer my question. I want to make the tray/drawer back and sides out of 1/2" BB as they're relatively small and was thinking that cutting the lock joint on the corners would let me assemble them with a band clamp and immediately glue and nail the plywood bottom on the assembly - set it aside and move to the next one - thinking that this may be easier and quicker that cutting groove/dadoes. As I see it, the bit would give me an 1/8" thick "cap" on the front that would cover the end grain on the sides. I could start with pieces wide enough to rip the required parts, and cut the joints in the full size pieces before ripping them to size. Does this seem like a practical way to make these assemblies?

I have the bit - used it for one project years ago, and seem to remember that I had some problem at the time getting the bit set up so it would cut the correct joint. Hoping to get it right this time as I'm planning a mahogany "Ming style" buffet for my wife, and need to come up with an easy way to make good looking inset drawers (and maybe use under-mount slides).
 

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get the setup gauge...
no worries...
some plan ''B''s included...

..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow, everything I need to know about drawer joints. Thanks Stick. I wasn't crazy about the lock miter joint as I felt the sharp point was fragile, easily damaged and would result in a poor finished part but it looks as if you can adjust the settings to give a variable height flat instead of the point. Something to think about, but as I already have the Drawer Lock bit I think I'll stick with that for now - but I will get the set-up block as you recommend. It does look though as if the tear-out would be a problem when cutting the sides and cutting against the grain - wonder if a climb cut just kissing the surface before resetting the fence to the correct depth would minimize that. I'll have to look at Sommerfeld's video again as I think he does something like that, and for the same reason. I guess the other option would be to set up the TS and take a shallow scoring cut across the face before the router table...........

That's some fancy sanding blocks there. I have a commercial version of the one shown in the first photo below, uses 1-1/2" wide rolls, but really too narrow for a lot of work. I have some 6/4 hard maple left over from a job and keep meaning to make a couple of wider ones. One thing, I bought as sheet of 1/16" hard rubber that I cut strips from and glue to the block under the paper. I have a couple like the second one but I've split one from driving the wedge in too hard. Maybe there's some way to reinforce it to prevent that, perhaps driving a couple of screws through the thickness right at the bottom of the notch? I bought a box of belt "offcuts from Klingspoor a while back - really heavy duty cloth-backed material which make a good sanding block - very reasonable priced for the amount of material that I got for the money.
 

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Wow, everything I need to know about drawer joints. Thanks Stick. I wasn't crazy about the lock miter joint as I felt the sharp point was fragile, easily damaged and would result in a poor finished part but it looks as if you can adjust the settings to give a variable height flat instead of the point. Something to think about, but as I already have the Drawer Lock bit I think I'll stick with that for now - but I will get the set-up block as you recommend. It does look though as if the tear-out would be a problem when cutting the sides and cutting against the grain - wonder if a climb cut just kissing the surface before resetting the fence to the correct depth would minimize that. I'll have to look at Sommerfeld's video again as I think he does something like that, and for the same reason. I guess the other option would be to set up the TS and take a shallow scoring cut across the face before the router table...........

That's some fancy sanding blocks there. I have a commercial version of the one shown in the first photo below, uses 1-1/2" wide rolls, but really too narrow for a lot of work. I have some 6/4 hard maple left over from a job and keep meaning to make a couple of wider ones. One thing, I bought as sheet of 1/16" hard rubber that I cut strips from and glue to the block under the paper. I have a couple like the second one but I've split one from driving the wedge in too hard. Maybe there's some way to reinforce it to prevent that, perhaps driving a couple of screws through the thickness right at the bottom of the notch? I bought a box of belt "offcuts from Klingspoor a while back - really heavy duty cloth-backed material which make a good sanding block - very reasonable priced for the amount of material that I got for the money.
Good ideas Tom. Easy to make.
 

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It does look though as if the tear-out would be a problem when cutting the sides and cutting against the grain - wonder if a climb cut just kissing the surface before resetting the fence to the correct depth would minimize that..
If you mean as it passes the end of the board then any bit cutting cross grain can and probably will cause tear out. You can reduce or eliminate that by using a pusher block. If your talking in the middle of the board then I agree with using the saw cut.
 
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If you can accurately locate the router bit's cut line, it would be quicker to score it with a knife. You just need to get past the first layer of veneer.
 
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