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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey fellows, if you've following my progression (which I certainly don't expect), I have an 8" Grizzly Jointer, a 15" Grizzly Planer and the lowly 10" Hitachi Table Saw. I have found several rotacators, but, of course have no experience with them. So once again I'm here seeking your expert advice. These are some of the models I have been looking at. A unit that can be used on all three would be ideal!

This looks like the one Grizzly sells for the planer, don't know how it would work out on the table saw.
https://www.amazon.com/Woodstock-Wind-Chimes-W1218A-Rotacator/dp/B0000DD0P0?SubscriptionId=AKIAJ2F6RDUSIYCWQMFQ&tag=sa-sym-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B0000DD0P0

Grizzly also makes this one, very inexpensive but gets mostly ok reviews.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0000DD0VA?m=A2LM8ZC59IT9RX&ref_=v_sp_widget_detail_page

This one is a precision square as well.
https://www.amazon.com/Oneway-2289-Multi-Gauge/dp/B0002SA98I?SubscriptionId=AKIAJ2F6RDUSIYCWQMFQ&tag=sa-sym-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B0002SA98I

This one looks like it would work great on the table saw. It of course has an aluminum table, so I don't know how the others would work out.
Woodpeckers | Saw Gauge (SG-WP)


And feel free to lead me to another option. As always, thanks in advance for all the help you guys have given me!
 

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Never heard that expression, Rotacator, before...
Unless you're making precision parts for the aerospace industry, the less expensive models will work just fine. The only part that's critical is the gauge itself. Buy the less expensive model; you can always buy up if you're really unhappy with it. It's not like buying quality with carbide tools or electronics. Just my opinion. I've got a cheap one and it works well...my machinist buddy did a bit of set-up work for me, using it, and he had no complaints.

* The Grizzly one looks identical to mine. Same price range taking the $Cdn. exchange rate into account.
 

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I hope you come up with a one-gauge-fits-all solution, because it certainly would be helpful. I use the oneway model for my jointer, but it won’t work with my planer. The gauge needed for a table saw needs to run off the miter slot to make sure it is parallel with the blade, for that I bought the woodpecker model, but it doesn’t help with the planer either.
The planer is the hard one since they aren’t all built the same and there is no easy way to reference from a flat surface. For my planer I use the silly manual gauge that came with my planer that references off the curved head since I can’t come up with something better.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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I don't use anything like that for planer or jointer. It might help a bit with the planer but the thing that's critical with the jointer is getting the blades set flat in relation to the beds and then setting the outfeed table to the right height in relation to the blades. The gauge won't necessarily help with that. I usually just use a caliper as a depth gauge to set the TS although that would be a bit more accurate. And I do have one like the Grizz. I think it's a Tek Lok which were really popular here at one time. Might be the same one that Dan has.
 

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@DaninVan

Labeling, Dan, labeling. Calling it a "rotacator" means you can charge more. Check the price differences. >:)
You might be right. When mountain pine beetles started killing trees off up here there was a lot of the lumber to get rid of. The beetles carry a fungus that turns the sapwood blue and they couldn't get rid of it a decent price. Until someone re-labelled it "denim pine". Then they starting charging more than if it wasn't blue.
 
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