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Newb w/ first router, a used 1/2" Hitachi in a router table setup. I don't have any bits, and need a round over bit for my first project using the router. Just need to round over the edge of 3/4" plywood. Not sure what the right size is, but I'm just looking to soften the edge for comfort, not dramatically reshape it for any kind of aesthetic reason.

Maybe a 1/4" round over is the right size? Or even 1/8"?

Any recommendations for a budget bit in 1/2" shank? I don't want to spend $20 on a roundover bit, but want something better than what Harbor Freight offers.
 

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Lots of opinions amongst the members here, based on past versions of the same question. My own take on it is 'You get what you pay for!'
More expensive bits typically have better quality, thicker carbide, and are likely better factory honed. ie a better finish on your cuts.
Amortized over a longer usable lifespan, the cost of the bit is probably less for the pricier bit.
Keep your eye open for bit sales!
 

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Plywood requires a quality bit,which run around $20. like Dan said you will use it many times in the future, it is one of the most used bits in the shop.
Plywood has a lot of glue and cheap bits will wear out fast.
Herb
agreed....
 

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A poll taken on the forum years ago stated that a 1/4" round over bit was THE most used bit among all members. It seems to be the perfect size the majority of the time and that is probably because it's the right balance for 3/4" thick material. No one has ever suggested where along the list of bit maker's Yonico's fall quality wise but they are decent and the prices are good. https://www.yonicotools.com/product...hank-yonico-13162?_pos=6&_sid=428c0fd9d&_ss=r
 
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If that is all you need, sanding it should do. I normally use my ROS, but a sanding stick will work just fine - just clue strips of sandpaper on wood strips.
 

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A poll taken on the forum years ago stated that a 1/4" round over bit was THE most used bit among all members. It seems to be the perfect size the majority of the time and that is probably because it's the right balance for 3/4" thick material. No one has ever suggested where along the list of bit maker's Yonico's fall quality wise but they are decent and the prices are good. https://www.yonicotools.com/product...hank-yonico-13162?_pos=6&_sid=428c0fd9d&_ss=r
I am not familiar with those bits, but have heard some good reviews from time to time. Infact I have never ran across them in my travels, that I can remember.
Herb
 

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I am not familiar with those bits, but have heard some good reviews from time to time. Infact I have never ran across them in my travels, that I can remember.
Herb
I bought a few architectural style bits a while back for future projects I haven't had a chance to get to yet but the sharpening job on them is with at least 600 grit, the carbide is thick and sharp, and even the paint finish is well done. I think I paid a little over $25 for the most expensive one which was a table edge with bullnose and ogee profile that would have cost me $100 or more in Amana, Freud, and CMT. BJ used to talk about them and he said they were good value for the money.
 

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@stick, have you had much joy with those planes on plywood? I have had very variable results on solid wood - I avoid them altogether on splintery wood. Also don’t like them for longish runs, not ideal for the handholds in the OP, pliometric box.
Unlike Theo, I hate sanding, so it’s a round over bit for me. @jay, I am with Charles: the 1/4” gives a nice rounded edge on 3/4” material. Smaller gives a “smoothed” square edge. Perhaps worth trying the El Cheapos in various radii, then buying a better one in the size you prefer. As I stated elsewhere, I use El Cheapos as virtual disposables, but having tried a Lee Valley 1/4” round-over bit, I would buy that quality for frequent, long-term use, as the other guys have said.
By the way, for a 1/4” round-over, a 1/4” shaft should be adequate for most purposes, if price is the issue and you have managed to clean up your collet reducing sleeve.
 

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Depends a lot on the plywood. I wasted money on some Chinese crap that had a layr of bamboo strands inside. It splintered so badly it was completely useless. Baltic Birch, however, can really look nice with a roundover. Almost never use anything but BB anymore, only if I need a piece longer than 5 feet. Then I look for ply with many thin layers and pay a premium.

Another approach is to put edge banding on the ply and roundover the solid wood. This will be more decorative than a ply edge. A few years ago in an Amish area, I saw shelving of BB ply with a bullnose edge--really interesting and colorful.

1/8th would ease the edge, 1/4 would be a little more likely to tear out or spinter because it will attack 3 to 4 layers, each with grain in opposing directions.
 

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agree with the 1/8 bit. As stated, and this applies to all plywood, but yes mainly cheaper stuff you would get at home depot, and the like. The 1/4 roundover is much more likely to rip out/splinter the lower layers. And as you had stated, its not really for aesthetics more as a precaution as I see it (which if that is the case, then I would add a 3/4 solid edge with perhaps a contrasting wood.)
 

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Regular ply usually looks pretty bad when you try and round it over. Anything that I want to look good that has ply panels gets edge banded with solid wood as others have suggested. The solid wood rounds over just fine.
 
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I usually edge band ply with solid timber if I am going to round it over If i am not rounding over I use a 1/16 roundover to take the sharp edge off either side of the ply
 

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$20 buys you a cheap 1/2" shank bit. Check out Yonico on Amazon. Decent, and inexpensive.
As for the radius, it depends on what you are looking for.
I keep a 1/8" radius bit in a laminate trimmer to quickly ease edges. I also use 1/4" and 3/8" a lot.
 
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