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Hi, I'am totally new to using a router. I have had a bosh 1613evs for 6 yrs and have never had the opportunity to use it. Now however I woud like to use it to make 1/4 inch roundover cut on some cherry pieces I have. My question is i realize that i can go along the side of piece folloe=wing the grain
but can I go around the ends as well. thanks clueless
 

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Hi clue

You got it right, when routing on the outside edge push the router away from you that's to say go couter clockwise and go around the end slow BUT do take the time to practice on some scrap wood 1st. corners can be tricky.
Make a shallow cut 1st. and then make one more pass to clean it up.
You can do this by pulling the bit up or use a router fence.

Just clamp the stock to the work bench or use a router pad to work on.
You can also use padded shelf paper it's the same as a router pad at 1/2 the price.
Home Depot in a roll for 18" x 6ft. long 5.oo bucks.

Bj :)
 

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clueless1 said:
Hi, I'am totally new to using a router. I have had a bosh 1613evs for 6 yrs and have never had the opportunity to use it. Now however I woud like to use it to make 1/4 inch roundover cut on some cherry pieces I have. My question is i realize that i can go along the side of piece folloe=wing the grain
but can I go around the ends as well. thanks clueless
If these articles you are talking about are small my advice would be to add a Router support to your router or use the router in the overhead position.
 

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Clue. Another tip is to clamp some sacrificial wood either side of the piece so when you cut across the end grain it reduces the chance of tearout. Also, do your end grain cuts first so if you do get tearout you can clean it up when you do your long grain cuts.
 
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