Router Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I was thinking about getting the Rousseau 3509 9" x 12" x 3/8" Deluxe Router Base Plate. I will be attaching a Hitachi M12V 3-1/4 HP router. Does anyone know if the plate is predrilled for this router or will I have to drill holes?

Thanks,

Deck
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Deck, invest the few extra dollars for the installation template too. Once you are set up and running you will either build more tables or add other routers and the template makes installation a breeze. (Yes, I practice what I preach. I have installed 3 Rousseau plates so far and two more coming up in the next week or so.)
The centering kits and templates are also available from Woodcraft, Amazon and other locations.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Mike, do you need a guide bushing with the template? Also what type bit? Thanks

aniceone2hold said:
Deck, invest the few extra dollars for the installation template too. Once you are set up and running you will either build more tables or add other routers and the template makes installation a breeze. (Yes, I practice what I preach. I have installed 3 Rousseau plates so far and two more coming up in the next week or so.)
The centering kits and templates are also available from Woodcraft, Amazon and other locations.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
The template comes with a 2 part guide bushing that fits PC style mounting holes. You will need a 1/2" straight or plunge cutting bit with a cutting length slightly longer than your table thickness. You can drill and then use the straight bit, but if you have to buy a bit get the plunge bit and eliminate a step. The 2 part guide bushing is a gem. A set screw holds the collar in place for the first step, then remove the collar for the 2nd step. What a great time saver. Be smart, unplug your router while removing the collar. Safety first!

Note: Pay close attention when selecting the mounting kit for your router, they all look the same but have different hardware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Question, for step 1 you would have to have a flat bottom rabbet bit correct? The second step would need the plunge or cutting bit to go all the way thru. Step 1 only goes down app 3/8 to 1/2 "
aniceone2hold said:
The template comes with a 2 part guide bushing that fits PC style mounting holes. You will need a 1/2" straight or plunge cutting bit with a cutting length slightly longer than your table thickness. You can drill and then use the straight bit, but if you have to buy a bit get the plunge bit and eliminate a step. The 2 part guide bushing is a gem. A set screw holds the collar in place for the first step, then remove the collar for the 2nd step. What a great time saver. Be smart, unplug your router while removing the collar. Safety first!

Note: Pay close attention when selecting the mounting kit for your router, they all look the same but have different hardware.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Step 1 is a through cut, done in multiple passes. (plunge part way and make a circuit, plunge further and repeat till through.) This gives you the main opening. For step 2 removing the collar brings the bit closer to the template. The same 1/2" bit then cuts the rabbit or rebate. (The ledge your mounting plate sits on) You set your router on the template and adjust your plunge depth so the bit just touches the table. Perfect adjustment every time. The instructions are easy to follow. There are small leveling screws close to the corners on the long sides of the plate. Older kits did not include the screws and if you managed to get one of these it is not a problem. Simply run a tap through the holes for allen screws you can pick up at any hardware store. (The first 3 plates I installed didn't have the screws, the last 2 did.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Thanks Mike, I bought the Rousseau for the fact it had the corner snubbers and the height adjustment feature. Now my next big issue is to figure out a fence/ Any great thoughts on this one??????? Soooooo many options


aniceone2hold said:
Step 1 is a through cut, done in multiple passes. (plunge part way and make a circuit, plunge further and repeat till through.) This gives you the main opening. For step 2 removing the collar brings the bit closer to the template. The same 1/2" bit then cuts the rabbit or rebate. (The ledge your mounting plate sits on) You set your router on the template and adjust your plunge depth so the bit just touches the table. Perfect adjustment every time. The instructions are easy to follow. There are small leveling screws close to the corners on the long sides of the plate. Older kits did not include the screws and if you managed to get one of these it is not a problem. Simply run a tap through the holes for allen screws you can pick up at any hardware store. (The first 3 plates I installed didn't have the screws, the last 2 did.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,007 Posts
deck99 said:
Hello,
I was thinking about getting the Rousseau 3509 9" x 12" x 3/8" Deluxe Router Base Plate. I will be attaching a Hitachi M12V 3-1/4 HP router. Does anyone know if the plate is predrilled for this router or will I have to drill holes?

Thanks,

Deck
deck99 I have some suggestions for when you drill the plate. If you have a drill press it's much easier. Once you have the hole locations marked on the plate don't try to drill all the way through from the rear. The plate will chip out on the front if you do. I would suggest drilling a small pilot hole first then with the larger drill bit drill only half way through from the back and then flip the plate over and finish the hole from the front side. This way you avoid any chipping. Also when you counter bore for the screw heads do this at low speed... it works better (less chatter with a smoother cut).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
George, I can't speak for any other plates but I have drilled all 3 Rousseau plates from the back side with a 9.6V Makita so far with no problems. The top of the plate will have a small countersink chamfer for the flat head screws and this leaves a very clean finish. Which reminds me, you will need a small countersinking bit for your drill JF. There are many good fence designs. BJ has a nice one that pivots, the one I use clamps on each end of the table, all home build except for some knobs and T-track from Rockler. I also used their T nuts/bolts, dust collection adaptor and hold downs. Having sliding faces to limit the size of the opening makes a great deal of sense to me. Bob and Rick make zero clearance fences from the HDPE strips and all of these fences work well. This is a matter of personal choice. I would do a search on this site for "fences" and get other peoples opinions but ultimately go with what makes the best sense to you. You are the one who will be using it and must be happy with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Thanks Mike, I am playing a touch dumb here but in your reply you mention "BJ", is that a company or an individual ? I want a split fence with a fixed portion above it. I would like the ability to have a tall fence in the 8" range or so for running raised panel doors or tenons but this could also be a home built "specialty" fence.

aniceone2hold said:
George, I can't speak for any other plates but I have drilled all 3 Rousseau plates from the back side with a 9.6V Makita so far with no problems. The top of the plate will have a small countersink chamfer for the flat head screws and this leaves a very clean finish. Which reminds me, you will need a small countersinking bit for your drill JF. There are many good fence designs. BJ has a nice one that pivots, the one I use clamps on each end of the table, all home build except for some knobs and T-track from Rockler. I also used their T nuts/bolts, dust collection adaptor and hold downs. Having sliding faces to limit the size of the opening makes a great deal of sense to me. Bob and Rick make zero clearance fences from the HDPE strips and all of these fences work well. This is a matter of personal choice. I would do a search on this site for "fences" and get other peoples opinions but ultimately go with what makes the best sense to you. You are the one who will be using it and must be happy with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi jfacteau

Here's a link or two to the fences I use on my router tables that are easy to make with a bit of MDF or Poly. or Alum. angle stock.

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/3326-acv.html

http://www.routerforums.com/router-bits-types-usage/3372-butterfly-bits.html

http://www.routerforums.com/voting-booth/311-removal-router-springs-table-use-2.html

http://www.routerforums.com/bargain-bin/2656-needs-bits.html


They are both the swing and pin type now at one time one of them was the side in place type but is was such a pain I rework it to the swing type.
They now use the T & G insert blocks for true chip breaker on most of the bit plus they can also be used for the spit type fence when I need that big hole in the fence.
One more note you can also put in a spacer on the 2nd part of the fence to use it for a joinner fence quick and easy by putting a piece of vinyl or poster board between the 1st fence and the 2nd fence, this will move it out by a 1/32" offset, that is need when you use any bit that removes the edge of the stock. i.e. beads bits,finger nail bits,etc.

Hope this helps

Bj :)
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top