Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 171 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m not new to woodworking, and I think I understand what happened, but looking for more thoughts.

I had a table router accident last week.
1. I would like to share it in hopes that it can stop someone else from repeating it.
2. I want to ensure that I understand what might have happened

I want to start out with the fact that I take great pride in being safe, as I think we all do. But I’m here to say that I misread what could happen. I now relate this as similar to a table saw kickback.

See attached pictures

I was doing a flush trim cut (.75” X 1.25” .5” Shaft flush trim bit) using ¼ inch hard board template. By the way, number 4 out of 4, so it was not the first one. The pine board was about 3 feet long with a 10 inch template at the right end of it. I was a couple inches into the cut, guiding the board with my right hand when all of a sudden the board flew to the right and the fingers of my left hand were in the router bit. The rest is history, including the ends of 2 fingers.

It’s been a week now and I think that I figured out what might have happened.
1. I think that the board somehow road up off of the bearing and then dug-in big time and fast
2. I think that the fingers of my left hand may not have been behind the board, but resting on top of it holding it down.
3. The board launched from left to right like a bullet, so fast that my left hand did not react, but instead went with the board to the bit. Just like a kick back on a table saw.

Does this sound like what may have happened?

Thanks in advance for your help
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,627 Posts
I bet you never do that again!

Were you trying to take off to much wood ? Taking more than than an 1/8" off is a no no.

What you propose may have happened. The best way to prevent that is to make your set up better. Like adding handles to hold to the template or workpiece. Then your hand would have been behind the wood and could not have slipped off the wood.

Even if the wood did slip off the template and grab the wood you need to think about where your hands would be if something like that happened and build the safety into the jig, fixture or or even the table you are using.

The pictures are great to show my kids to remind them why never to touch dads tools.

I have cut my finger tip off on a table saw. 100% my fault doing something stupid. :eek: I can add some pictures as well, but I think yours tell the story well enough.

Not to be an ass, but this is 100% operator error as 99.9% of accidents are, IMHO.

I hope you heal fast. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
DAM Darryl

I'm sorry to see you got nailed :( :( :(

They can get you in a heart beat :( :(


=======


I’m not new to woodworking, and I think I understand what happened, but looking for more thoughts.

I had a table router accident last week.
1. I would like to share it in hopes that it can stop someone else from repeating it.
2. I want to ensure that I understand what might have happened

I want to start out with the fact that I take great pride in being safe, as I think we all do. But I’m here to say that I misread what could happen. I now relate this as similar to a table saw kickback.

See attached pictures

I was doing a flush trim cut (.75” X 1.25” .5” Shaft flush trim bit) using ¼ inch hard board template. By the way, number 4 out of 4, so it was not the first one. The pine board was about 3 feet long with a 10 inch template at the right end of it. I was a couple inches into the cut, guiding the board with my right hand when all of a sudden the board flew to the right and the fingers of my left hand were in the router bit. The rest is history, including the ends of 2 fingers.

It’s been a week now and I think that I figured out what might have happened.
1. I think that the board somehow road up off of the bearing and then dug-in big time and fast
2. I think that the fingers of my left hand may not have been behind the board, but resting on top of it holding it down.
3. The board launched from left to right like a bullet, so fast that my left hand did not react, but instead went with the board to the bit. Just like a kick back on a table saw.

Does this sound like what may have happened?

Thanks in advance for your help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was taking < 1/8 off. I guess I never thought the router could pull a board like that, but when you think about it, 3hp at 25K rpms, it sure can. It goes to show that you must always have an escape route for your fingers. A better setup next time for sure. I think chucking the bit in a hand-held pluge router and stationary work piece.

Thanks for the quick reply, how long did your healing take?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
5,688 Posts
Oh Man that has to hurt like all get out. I am sorry to read of your accident Darryl and hope things heal quickly. I know there is no sure fire way to prevent accidents, but it makes me understand why I use tools like my Grr...rippers so much. Next to the table saw, the router keeps my attention at attention.

Best of luck and thanks for sharing with us as a reminder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,627 Posts
I still feel it, I think about 6 months it took to totally grow a nail and everything, but I lost just the tip, you lost more. They sewed most of my tip back on. It was cut off halfway between the top and bottom of the finger nail. I think my tip grew back so well because my cut was straight. They just sewed it right back on the finger. The router probably cut your finger in a worse way were nothing could be used.

I feel bad for you, that hurts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
Sorry to hear of your accident Darryl. Do I take it from your posting that you only had one hand controlling the router? I always use both hands to control the router even if on the baseplate (as in sign routing) I always clamp the timber or if it is small enough use a router mat. I do hope it heals quickly for you and feel for your pain.

Excuse my ignorance I just re read the posting and it was on the router table, Sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,165 Posts
Damn. That is terrible. It looks like the guide bearing is too far down.
Push blocks. That's what you need to use. I've made several of them for uses like that.
Hope your fingers heal well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
:eek:

1st: Sorry about the accident. Hope a good recovery & no restricted finger usage.

2nd: Thanks for posting the accident.
Very good reminder to keep everyone on their toes that working with routers (as well as other tools) can be dangerous.
I'm new to routers so this is a real good "this can happen" scenario.

I made this for free hand cuts just cause I got nervous being close to the bits.
Got the idea from one of bj3 jigs.
Don't know if this would have helped, but maybe. (bottom pics)
http://www.routerforums.com/88918-post29.html


Again
Thanks & hope all heals well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Darryl,
I am sorry to see that happen to anyone. When you say the piece pulled off to the right and your left hand was behind the piece, I think I might have a belated answer. From your pictures, it would appear that you were feeding the piece in the wrong direction. That is to say, the piece should have been on the left side of the router bit and you should have been feeding it from right to left. When in the table, the bit rotation is counter-clockwise. I would think you may have hit a knot and were actually doing what is called a "climb cut". With the bit in a pulling direction, it caused the piece to bounce off and pull you in. You did not say how you were feeding it and what I just said may not be the answer, but as Bob & Rick have said before "observe bit rotation". I hope your recovery is quick.
Joe Z.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Thank you thank you thank you for posting your experience. It will help the rest of us (I hope) pay CLOSE attention to what we are doing. I recognize those stiff black threads protruding from your finger stubs. Had a few of those myself now and again. It'll heal faster than you think. Sometimes a little sip of good bourbon will help.....after you have finished work of course.
Oh...none of the black threads were the result of a tool accident. I'm the original Captain Cautious when it comes to power tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Birch

By the way how is your knife cut accident healing :)


======

Thank you thank you thank you for posting your experience. It will help the rest of us (I hope) pay CLOSE attention to what we are doing. I recognize those stiff black threads protruding from your finger stubs. Had a few of those myself now and again. It'll heal faster than you think. Sometimes a little sip of good bourbon will help.....after you have finished work of course.
Oh...none of the black threads were the result of a tool accident. I'm the original Captain Cautious when it comes to power tools.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
19,126 Posts
Darryl,

Thanks for the post.

We should all be reminded every now and then of the danger of the tools we use.

Sorry that it had to be at your expense. get well soon.

Every time I approach the router table from now on I will picture the ends of your fingers. :(

James
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
Hi Darryl,

Sorry to hear of this accident. I hope that you heal quickly.

I have to agree with Joe Z. It sounds like feeding in the wrong direction. The following I suggest for everyone. Please consider a simple jig with a hold down clamp. There are some jigs on the market to handle such jobs.

I'd rather talk with you all than about you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Damn, that's a hard hit! All my best in your healing process. This post will really get everyone thinking. Thanks for sharing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Darryl,
I am sorry to see that happen to anyone. When you say the piece pulled off to the right and your left hand was behind the piece, I think I might have a belated answer. From your pictures, it would appear that you were feeding the piece in the wrong direction. That is to say, the piece should have been on the left side of the router bit and you should have been feeding it from right to left. When in the table, the bit rotation is counter-clockwise. I would think you may have hit a knot and were actually doing what is called a "climb cut". With the bit in a pulling direction, it caused the piece to bounce off and pull you in. You did not say how you were feeding it and what I just said may not be the answer, but as Bob & Rick have said before "observe bit rotation". I hope your recovery is quick.
Joe Z.
Hi Joe,
Thanks for the feedback, I was feeding it right to left against the bit rotation, so it was not a climb cut, I would not do those intentionally. I was only cutting the curved part. I know it may sound a little confusing, I started my cut about 10" from the right end.

Thanks for the good wishes
Darryl
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Such a terrible thing Daryl. I'm really sorry!

Perhaps I'm wrong, but truly believe most accidents happen when we get over confident or aren't fully involved in what we are doing. If you feel that the task you are doing is possibly dangerous, STOP and reconsider. Feelings are facts!

Be safe, Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Were you using a flush trim or patern bit? I have been using a patern bit (well extended) and the bearing slips down the shank. and the work ruined. Maybe this was the case and your fingers were ruined too!
 
1 - 20 of 171 Posts
Top