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There is a router adapter that allows the bit to be tightened or removed with just a allen wrench. I bought one a couple of years ago, but the wrench got lost in the flood in 2016 and I am trying to set up my work shop again and cannot remember the name of the adapter to find out what size wrench is needed. I don't want to have to buy a whole set of wrenches to get one. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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There is a router adapter that allows the bit to be tightened or removed with just a allen wrench. I bought one a couple of years ago, but the wrench got lost in the flood in 2016 and I am trying to set up my work shop again and cannot remember the name of the adapter to find out what size wrench is needed. I don't want to have to buy a whole set of wrenches to get one. Any help would be appreciated.
I assume the set screw just bears against the bit. A collet squeezes a bit from all sides. That set screw idea is about as dangerous an idea as I can imagine. I can easily see the bit flying out in use. The screw can also raise burrs on the bit. You have to be kidding about the Allen keys. Break down and buy a set. They are only a few bucks.

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I assume the set screw just bears against the bit. A collet squeezes a bit from all sides. That set screw idea is about as dangerous an idea as I can imagine. I can easily see the bit flying out in use. The screw can also raise burrs on the bit. You have to be kidding about the Allen keys. Break down and buy a set. They are only a few bucks.

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If he's talking about the Musclechuck, there are a lot of guys on this forum that have them and swear by them. In fact there are a number of other brands that do the same thing but the Musclechuck seems to be the most popular.

The OP was not only looking for the name of the adapter but I assume he didn't know the size of the hex key needed as well.
@tvman44 - I believe @Cherryville Chuck stated it takes a 4mm hex key - equivalent is a 5/32" key.
 

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I assume the set screw just bears against the bit. A collet squeezes a bit from all sides. That set screw idea is about as dangerous an idea as I can imagine. I can easily see the bit flying out in use. The screw can also raise burrs on the bit. You have to be kidding about the Allen keys. Break down and buy a set. They are only a few bucks.

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The set screw does not bear against the bit.
Quick Change Camless Router Chuck Wood Working Accessories

Neatest thing since dial tone.
 

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I assume the set screw just bears against the bit. A collet squeezes a bit from all sides. That set screw idea is about as dangerous an idea as I can imagine. I can easily see the bit flying out in use. The screw can also raise burrs on the bit. You have to be kidding about the Allen keys. Break down and buy a set. They are only a few bucks.

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On the contrary , study this shot of one of my three MUSCLECHUCKS and you will see that almost the complete inner circumference grips the bit several times stronger than a standard collet chuck. Personally I wouldn't like to carry on routing without a MUSCLECHUCK on each of my three 1/2" routers. An added feature is the extra 1/2" depth of cut and the ability to change bits without any spanners and from above the table, with just a 4mm Allen key, preferably a ball ended one. The only "similar" chuck that I've come across has a grub screw that DOES bear against the bit
 

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John DeRosa did torque tests between his Musclechuck and standard collets and the MC had I think about 4x the gripping power. Personally I wouldn’t trust a grub screw to hold anything more than a pencil in my circle drawing trammel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the info. 4 mm it. is. I love the Muscle Chuck, wish they also made one for 1/4" routers.
 
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Thanks for the info. 4 mm it. is. I love the Muscle Chuck, wish they also made one for 1/4" routers.
The Muscle chuck is a good simple design but requires router bits with accurate 1/2" bit shanks otherwise you will lose concentricity.

In the CNC router world, the ER type collets are now most popular - adapted from metal working.
ER20 for 1/2" shank bits can also take 12mm router bits perfectly
ER11A for 1/4" shank router bits will also take 6mm router bits perfectly.

There are ROUTER check extenders with ER20 or ER11A available for the portable routers.


Fritz Weber, a precision toolmaker from Switzerland, founded REGO-FIX in 1950. He then went on to invent and patent the original ER collet system in 1973, a revolutionary product that continues to set the standard in toolholding design.
ER collet system has been standardised by DIN & ISO.
 

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In the CNC router world, the ER type collets are now most popular - adapted from metal working.
ER20 for 1/2" shank bits can also take 12mm router bits perfectly
ER11A for 1/4" shank router bits will also take 6mm router bits perfectly.

There are ROUTER check extenders with ER20 or ER11A available for the portable routers.
I would love to be able to fit my Makita with a ER20 collet, I have seen ER20 extenders on Ebay from China that simply go into the existing 1/2" chuck but they are poorly made according to purchasers and unusable.

I see that PreciseBits make ER20 compatible collet kits for some routers. Pity they don't make one for Makita.

https://www.precisebits.com/gateways/ColletsNutsHome.htm
 

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"The Muscle chuck is a good simple design but requires router bits with accurate 1/2" bit shanks otherwise you will lose concentricity."

That is quite true but spending big on the Musclechuck deserves quality bits Reuelt which I'm sure YOU do!
 

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Collets also require the bit to be accurately sized.
Correct
Muscle Chuck Spec.
Bore: .500 in (+.001/ -.000)
Concentricity: <.001 in="" br="">

Amana’s bits are carefully ground and polished to no less than .001” of the collet size to ensure a secure fit in the router collet.
Someone said: “I tried many different brands and found that "Woodline" bits were designed and ground to the high tolerance”
sometimes the shank size of inexpensive bits can be as much as .008” under the collet size.
Another said: “Cheap adapter bushings from MLCS don't work also....I updated these to Whiteside adapter bushings and all is now well”.
So
Using std chuck or Muscle chuck, I would prefer Amana, Woodline or Whiteside bits over cheaper bits.

BUT if I use ER20 collects or ER20 Extension with a 1/2" collet, all bits will (expensive or cheap) will be concentric even when STD machine collet or Muscle Chuck fails. That was the point I made.
I could not get an ER20 chuck for my routers but I have ER20 extension for my router table.
The design of the ER system is SUPERIOR to my router's collet & muscle chuck.
Use a 27mm tube spanner.
 

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A good test for accurate bits is to slightly insert one into a MUSCLECHUCK and it will slowly drop down, try it!
 
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