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I have a Dewalt 611 & 618. I would like to know if there is an easy way to put center lines on the bases both sides? How does one do that? Please be specific. Thanks...
 

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If you put a guide bush centering pin in the router then you could lay a straight edge over the point and scribe that line. However, when you rotate the router at all the line would be off parallel to a fence or whatever you wanted to line up for so I don't know what use it would be to you. Can you elaborate as to what you think you need it for?
 
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Hey, Michael; Bill Hylton's book, 'Router Magic' has very explicit instructions for making a clear base with 'cross hairs'. He also has included instructions for several other application specific bases.
If you don't have the book yet, you really want one! :)
 

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Remove the base plate. Clamp two pieces of wood parallel, exactly the diameter of the router's base. Check by fitting the router between at both ends. Once set parallel, remove the router.

Divide the distance between the two pieces and make marks wider apart than the diameter of the router base. Draw a line connecting the marks. Double check to make certain the marks are precisely centered. Place the router over the line, between the boards. Place the router between the boards and use a marker to transfer the drawn line onto the router's metal base. See the diagram below.

Replace the sub base on the router, using a centering pin (Pix below) to center the sub base. You could mark the sub base with a white fine point marker, but if you remove the sub base you will want to re-center it.
 

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Hey, Michael; Bill Hylton's book, 'Router Magic' has very explicit instructions for making a clear base with 'cross hairs'. He also has included instructions for several other application specific bases.
If you don't have the book yet, you really want one! :)
I've got Patrick Spielman's router book. Does he cover the same info as Bill Hylton?
 

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I've got Patrick Spielman's router book. Does he cover the same info as Bill Hylton?
I've read Spielman's but not Hylton's. However, based on many comments I've seen about ideas taken from Hylton's book I would say that they don't share all the same ideas.
 

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This the centering pin I was talking about. Amazon Canada shows it for $20. I've seen it for $7. It was included free with one or more of my Hitachi routers. It would be fairly easy to scribe a line across the tip. Getting it accurately square to the base plate is another issue.

Dan what does Hylton say is the advantage of having the crosshairs?
 

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Here's a copy of the opening page on the DIY crosshair baseplate...
(I'm sure Mr. Hylton won't mind; I'm promoting his book! :) )
Which of Hylotn's book is this page taken from"
Amazon US lists pages of books
 

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Charles; he discusses the purpose in the clip I posted. Basically if you do a light pencil layout on your work piece ...obviously at 90deg to each other, and long enough that you can see the lines though the clear baseplate, you can bore precise holes.
The lines on the baseplate are scribed on the bottom of it so there's no parallax issue.

Tom; https://www.amazon.com/Router-Magic-Fixtures-Unleash-Potential/dp/0762101857

I'm not saying everyone needs one, I'm just responding to the OP's question.
 

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Without having the book to be able to read the complete article...................

This is the way I've done it

- Square up the blank and scribe the lines on the bottom surface

- Bore a 1/4" diameter hole at the intersection of the scribed lines

- Chuck a piece of 1/4" dowel rod in the router, remove the original base plate and assemble to the base plate using the 1/4" dowel to center the router.

- After orienting the router relative to the edges of the base plate, mark the centers of the mounting holes (I have cone point setscrews to match the tapped holes in the router base). Also, match-mark the router base to the base plate so that it can be reassembled in the same orientation.

- Drill and countersink the holes in the new base plate, open up the center hole as required.

You now have a router where the spindle is located on the intersection of the scribed lines on the bottom of the base plate.
 

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Charles; he discusses the purpose in the clip I posted. Basically if you do a light pencil layout on your work piece ...obviously at 90deg to each other, and long enough that you can see the lines though the clear baseplate, you can bore precise holes.
The lines on the baseplate are scribed on the bottom of it so there's no parallax issue.

Tom; https://www.amazon.com/Router-Magic-Fixtures-Unleash-Potential/dp/0762101857

I'm not saying everyone needs one, I'm just responding to the OP's question.
I don't use a router to drill holes so I had not considered that possibility. Thanks Dan.
 
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If you desire a centerline on a router base for drilling holes vertically and at precise points where a drill press can’t be used then I would think something like this would be easier. I use this with my Kreg stepped drill bit for holes where I want to use pocket screws, but this design could easily be adapted for use with brad point bits of various sizes as well as forstner bits if they have the same size shanks (so you don’t need a separate jig for every size). These bits all have a pilot point enabling you to place the tip at a precise point you have marked on the wood. You’d have to customize the jig width and depth to allow for visibility below the bit during setup, proper height for the length of the bit and plunge depth needed, and stability to keep it standing vertically in use. I use stop collars on my bit to control depth so I don’t overdrill. I have used the heck out of this thing and it’s super easy to do and very accurate.
 

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If you desire a centerline on a router base for drilling holes vertically and at precise points where a drill press can’t be used then I would think something like this would be easier. I use this with my Kreg stepped drill bit for holes where I want to use pocket screws, but this design could easily be adapted for use with brad point bits of various sizes as well as forstner bits if they have the same size shanks (so you don’t need a separate jig for every size). These bits all have a pilot point enabling you to place the tip at a precise point you have marked on the wood. You’d have to customize the jig width and depth to allow for visibility below the bit during setup, proper height for the length of the bit and plunge depth needed, and stability to keep it standing vertically in use. I use stop collars on my bit to control depth so I don’t overdrill. I have used the heck out of this thing and it’s super easy to do and very accurate.
What a great little jig. You're right about the DP being too small to use on wide pieces. I have a couple of metal drill guides, but they're pretty light duty. I wonder if I can drill holes into the jig the right size to fit those metal guides? Gotta check my Forstner set for the correct size. Looks like a couple of hours in the shop to make it.
 

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What a great little jig. You're right about the DP being too small to use on wide pieces. I have a couple of metal drill guides, but they're pretty light duty. I wonder if I can drill holes into the jig the right size to fit those metal guides? Gotta check my Forstner set for the correct size. Looks like a couple of hours in the shop to make it.
The metal guides are 1/2" by 20 thread. You can thread wood with a metal tap but you could go with a friction fit too. You might have to go 1/64th under 1/2 to get a good enough fit. If you are going to try tapping a hole so that you could change sizes then the tap hole is generally 1/16th inch smaller than the thread size for 1/4 to 1/2" sizes.
 

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I have one of these (see link).

I don't use it often, but when I do it is usually the only way that I have to get precise holes drilled that are located too far from the edge of the work for any of my drill presses to handle. With the possible exception of drilling shelf pin holes, I can't see a router being a very good choice for drilling holes, mostly because you can't use any size drill bit in it. It goes too fast for most drilling needs as well. The drill guide in the link has cross hair marks, a pair of V guides for drilling the center of round stock, a good depth stop, and it can be set for angle drilling. It's a great way to make a hand held drill more accurate, and you can easily see the bit and the location marks on the work.

Charley

https://www.generaltools.com/hand-tools/woodworking-tools/precision-drill-guide-with-3-8-in-chuck
 
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