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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

My name is Brian and I am a general contractor, I own a porter cable router plunger combo, and I was at home depot and noticed that ryobi has a full set of jigs for 87.00 while the porter cable you have to buy separately. Is there a differance between the two? thier both 1/4 inch shanks size and made of carbide. Should I just continue to buy the porter cable bits and leave the other alone?

thanks.
 

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Hi Brian welcome to the forum. I have a ryobi straight bit 1/4" shank I used it for 3 truck loads of rough sawed lumber before I got my jointer and it cuts the same as the day I bought it. Just gotta keep them cleaned up so they don't loose a edge. I've seen porter cable brand they look good but are pricey but the old saying is you get what you pay for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't think i wrote my question clearly. Home depot sells entire bit set for 87.00 for thier ryobi routers, while with the porter cable roters, each bit has to be bought separately. are there a differance between these bits?
 

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Hello hammernail, Welcome to the RouterForums :)


One suggestion. Before purchasing the Ryobi bit set HD I would do some shopping around. You may come out better by looking on line or Checking out the another store.

When I bought my first bit set, I purchased them from Lowe's (I believe they were Whiteside or something like that) but now wish I had gone online and checked out what I could have gotten for the same price or a little more.

See this page for On Line Shopping, I have nothing against Ryobi bits but would look on line first. I believe Woodline carries a 66 piece set. This will be my next bit set purchase I am putting it on my Wish list or Xmas list. I hope this helps.
 

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Hi Hammernail,
Welcome aboard.

I would not buy a "complete set" of bits, especially if you are new to routing, here's why. Unless you know in advance that you will use all the bits in the set, you may be buying some that will set on the shelf for years before you use them. I am speaking from expierence.

The best thing to do is decide what bits you will need to do a job, then buy the best quality bits you can afford. That way you will get the bits you need without buying a bunch of dust collectors.

I don't profess to be an expert on router bits, but there are a few things that would indicate a good router bit, such as the grade and thickness of carbide, anti kickback design, quality of silver soldering, and ball bearing guides. If it looks bad and poorly made, it probably is and will no doubt cut poorly. Do some research on router bit tests before you buy. Many of the major Woodworking and professional publications do tool tests and print their test results. While these aren't the only criteria, it would be a good place to start. It might just save you some money.

Happy Routing,
Chuck
 

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I think having a fairly complete set of bits is the way to go. Whether you ever end up using all is not the issue. I have purchased the biggest amount of bits in sets. My best set is from Costco. I am ready to try any joint or edging possible. When you are comfortable with your skills is the time to step up and get the specialty bits. Learning how to use my tools and imagination is my reward. Someday my shop will be well stocked with high quality tools, accessories, jigs and other things. It sure is fun just knowing that I can try to create or duplicate most anything.
Keep us posted with what you make. Everyone here is very supportive and willing to share ideas and experiences. Welcome to a great forum.
 

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It looks to me,that the people advocating large sets of bits are relatively new to routing and those saying buy only what you need and the best quality you can afford, have been at it for a while.If Lowe's sells whiteside bits it would be a surprise, they are ,in my opion, the best router bits on the market. And the are Made In America, unlike the Woodline and most other off brand sets of bits. These are simply my opions.
regards
jerry
 

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On page 8 of the current Woodsmith magazine: "Inexpensive router bit sets let you check out a wide range of profiles without spending a lot of money." I think of this forum as a place to support our hobbies.
The article goes on to say that even well- known manufacturers are getting into the discount business. Quality is what you make of it. Again, welcome. -Derek
 

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Fibertech,,, I have to aggree with you on the bits,,, I do not get that particular wood magazine,, but I do get quite a few others,,, and I forget which one it was but a few months ago,,, one of the magazines I do get, did quite a comprehensive test on big name brand bits and the no name brands, and after much controlled testing,, they found for the difference in the preformace, verses the cost of the bits,, that the no name bits were definitely, in their eyes,,, a good deal.
I have bought quite a few bits on Ebay,, and also some Whiteside, right from the manufacture,,, and even a couple of Bosch when I could not find the profile I wanted and did not want to spend anymore time searching,,, I have never had any unsatisfactory preformace from any of them,,,
As I mentioned before, I just completed running about 1000 feet of red oak of 1 inch thickness and used one of the no name router bits I purchased off Ebay,, and comparing the first few moldings and the last few moldings,,, you could not see any appareciable difference in the cut, or finish. I have no problem at all in trying to get the best value for my money.
 

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Brian,
If you still want a "complete" set of router bits, check out www.Homier.com. They have a 82 piece set of router bits for $49.99 plus shipping. It's item #04037. Shipping weight is 8lb. I'm in Middle TN and it would cost me $8.16 by UPS. Their phone no is 800-348-5004. They have other sets of bits and tools too.
Can't vouch for the quality, but.................
Good luck.
Chuck
 

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I have recently purchsed a 1/2" bit set from MLCS. The 30 piece set. I have found them to be a good bit. Have had no problems with what I want to do with them. Was recently talking to my grandfather, who does a considerable amount of routing, and asked him if he had heard of them. He said that he likes their bits. He gave me the same advise that I will pass on. Some multi bit kits are more than a person will ever use. Go for a set, if you choose, that will get you the most that you will use. Then from there, upgrade to the specialty bits as needed. Also, for a person just starting out, a inexpensive bit is nice to learn what he is doing before he goes and messes up a perfectly good expensive bit and a good piece of wood. That is how I learned. Bought a $20 10 pc set from Harbor Freight and some scrap pine and went to town getting a feel for it. Once I was comfortable with the router in my hand, I chucked up a better bit and went to town.
 

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Pop_pop1 said:
Brian,
If you still want a "complete" set of router bits, check out www.Homier.com. They have a 82 piece set of router bits for $49.99 plus shipping. It's item #04037. Shipping weight is 8lb. I'm in Middle TN and it would cost me $8.16 by UPS. Their phone no is 800-348-5004. They have other sets of bits and tools too.
Can't vouch for the quality, but.................
Good luck.
Chuck
How I wish I was in USA with such prices for router bit sets.
Boxed sets are always cheaper than separate bits and I thought I had bought a few bargains from a discount store with 12 piece sets for £5 ($9) which I stocked up on.
The largest hight street catalogue shop recently had an end of season sale with a 40 bit set for £20 ($36) which sold out before I could get there but an 82 bit set for $50 (£27.78) is the best bargain I have ever seen.
We always pay far more in UK that USA.
With £1 = $1.8 I often see American adverts on shopping channels and on checking the price in USA I find that they sell for the same number in UK pounds i.e. $40 worth is sold here for £40 making it 80% dearer.
I have an old pine chest of drawers made by my grandfather when my dad was born over 80 years ago when all pine furniture was painted.
My grandfather was a cabinet maker and the hand cut dovetails on the drawers are a work of art apart from the wide 5/16" boards wwhich have not warped in all that time.
I want to remove the many years of paint without harming the natural wood or patina so have been tempted by a non caustic stripper advertised on these channels. Searching for this product on USA websites showed the price the same in dollars as it is in pounds here making a tub of stripper $72 here as opposed to approx $40 in USA.
The same is true of all tools.
The Woodrat router jig has recently made inroads into the USA but I can almost guarantee that it is being sold for a lot less in the states than it is in the country in which it is made.
 
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