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Hello everyone,

I'm kind of new at this woodworking stuff, so please pardon me if this is a question that the more experienced woodworkers will roll their eyes and think "please, not this again". :)

I purchased a router, table and some bits recently for a home project which turned out great and now want to do more. The router bits I bought were from Sears, not the best I know, but served the purpose well. My next project will require me to work with plywood so I bought a set of undersized bits from Rockler. They look like nice bits, but the only marking on them is the brand name and stock number, not the size. This leads me to think down the road of having perhaps dozens of different sized straight bits and having to break out a caliper to make sure I have the size I need for every job, not a pleasant thought.

So, I guess my questions are:
1. Are most bits marked on the shank with the size like Sears? If so which ones are?

2. If not, how do you deal with this problem of keeping them straight?

Your time and answers are appreciated.
Thank You,
Joe Ohlandt
 

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Hi Joe

Most are NOT marked, BUT you can buy a tool that will mark them, it's called Elctro-Etch that will use a small pad ( 1 1/4" x 1 1/2" ) you type or write on the green paper and then just press in on the bit BUT it's about 100.oo bucks with the 110 volt pad and chem., it will mark stainless steel ,just about anything . :) It looks black the norm, it burns the mark in .
Some Mfg. use the same type of tool to put the name on the tool/bits.

But the easy way it make a router box for you bits just cut out some pictures from one of the many cat.and paste them to the box but once your done with them they go right back in the box in the same hole.


Many craft stores sell glue that's clear when it's setup.

But you don't want to mark the router bits with anything that will put marks in the shank or deform the shank any way it must stay true.

Bj :)


joeohlandt said:
Hello everyone,

I'm kind of new at this woodworking stuff, so please pardon me if this is a question that the more experienced woodworkers will roll their eyes and think "please, not this again". :)

I purchased a router, table and some bits recently for a home project which turned out great and now want to do more. The router bits I bought were from Sears, not the best I know, but served the purpose well. My next project will require me to work with plywood so I bought a set of undersized bits from Rockler. They look like nice bits, but the only marking on them is the brand name and stock number, not the size. This leads me to think down the road of having perhaps dozens of different sized straight bits and having to break out a caliper to make sure I have the size I need for every job, not a pleasant thought.

So, I guess my questions are:
1. Are most bits marked on the shank with the size like Sears? If so which ones are?

2. If not, how do you deal with this problem of keeping them straight?

Your time and answers are appreciated.
Thank You,
Joe Ohlandt
 

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I have a bunch of bits around and I haven't had a problem determining their size yet, and hopefully won't as I go. my 23/32" plywood bit is usually somewhere next to my 3/4" straight bit and I can see the size difference. Its like having a set of twins, only you may be able to tell them apart.
Better yet, get a scrap of wood and put a bunch of holes in it (1/2" or 1/4" or 8mm)whatever shank size, and stick your bits in the holes, write a little note by the hole....you get the idea. Good Luck.
 

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I used the electro-etch for marking cutters for a company, it works very well. After you acid etch you have to neutralize and wipe dry. By far the easiest way to keep your bits straight is to have a case with their positions labeled and return them as soon as you are done using them. You can use a simple piece of plywood with holes or build a nicer case like the ones BJ built for his bits. It is very important to keep the bits apart. You can also purchase cases for storing bits. The carbide edges will chip if they hit each other.
 

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Also, Welcome to the forums Joe. Glad to have you register and begin with questions. Here on this forum there are no silly questions as you can see by your answers. Keep it up.
 

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"This leads me to think down the road of having perhaps dozens of different sized straight bits and having to break out a caliper to make sure I have the size I need for every job, not a pleasant thought."

Joe

Joe as you get your cutters sharpened over the years you will find that they will be slightly smaller than when they were purchased so you will require to use your calipers to make sure you have the correct size.
Tom
 
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