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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking for a router bit suggestion for making a shallow relief in the bottom of a trestle table leg. See photo below for an example of the relief I want to create.

For my specific project, the relief cut will be only about 3/16th of an inch deep – not as deep as the photo apparently depicts.

The legs on my table are 2” wide and could require routing from both sides of the leg in order to cut across the 2” width. I plan to use my router table with a long fence so that the bottom of the table leg is always registered against the fence. I would move the fence further away on each pass in order to deepen the cut.

Perhaps there is an appropriate bit with a cutting length of 2” or bit longer so it wouldn’t require routing from both sides of the leg. Without the benefit of your reply, my initial thought would be either an upcut or downcut spiral bit.

Can you suggest a router bit for this application?

Thanks!
Table Furniture Rectangle Wood Outdoor furniture
 

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Bandsaw and sandpaper is easiest and quickest.
If you have a router table with a half inch router you can do it with a 2" straight sided bit. Carefully mark out the travel across the bit and fix stops to each side of the fence, Start with the bit only an 1/8" protruding. Then you can position the wood against the right hand stop, slowly feed into the bit, and move the wood to the left hand stop. Move the fence back another 1/8" and repeat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No band saw yet, but I do have a table saw, jointer, router table, drill press and a small array of hand tools. I considered using a coping saw but thought I'd get better/more consistent results with the router table.
Let me add -- thanks to Old55 for welcoming me and to Sunnybob for your reply - precisely the process I was thinking, just didn't know what kind of bit (straight, spiral, etc.)
 

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Welcome to the forum. With your drill press you can drill the radius needed for the two curves and then cut the straight part with a saw. You'll need to clean up the ends where the saw blade can't get into the radius cut and sand to finish or use a trim bit to do the cleanup. Having a template would help a good deal and leaving only 1/16 - 1/8" extra for the trim bit to do the cleanup.A hand saw can also get the part at the radius cut intersection. So I can see cutting the straight part with a table saw, jig saw, band saw. hand saw and pretty much any combination of those as well as using a Forstner bit for the correct radius cut.
 

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I suspect there are a number of things that a furniture shop may not normally do but if the customer or woodworker wants that why not? I've seen many pieces in high end furniture stores that wouldn't be seen in a run of the mill store which is what sets those pieces apart from the norm. Heck, a lot of those bookcases and tables are laminated particle board, something I try to stay away from. I prefer real wood products and am willing to pay for that wood. Now for a shop project like my miter station, plywood is just fine. A table in my dinning room I'd like to be set aprt from something anyone can just buy. The details are what make a good piece great.
 
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