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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks, I'm trying to find a router bit that has a cutting length of four inches.
Something like this but the blade (red part) should be 4" long.
Prefer something made in USA but open to any suggestions.
Thanks!

ps. I just had to "trim" an existing non-load bearing wall stud by 1/4" and it was not fun.
All I could think of is how much easier it would have been if I had something like this.
Hence, the reason for my post.
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Welcome to the forum, CZ.
You are looking for a Unicorn of the the Router Bits. How often will you be using this once you find one ?
I've used long bits like this in a hand-held router and it is a white knuckle ride all the way. The bit could break and go flying to who knows where, the router could get away from you, all kinds of bad things can happen.
Have you considered a grinding disk in a 4" Angle Grinder ?? Then, you would be much safer and achieve the same result quicker.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My longest cutting bit (trim bit, actually) right now is about 3" and I use it a lot on MDF and birch wood.
This one would rarely ever be used. It would be more of a "break glass in case of emergency" kind of tool.

My grinder is insanely useful but would not have helped very much today.
 

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Hi Folks, I'm trying to find a router bit that has a cutting length of four inches.
Something like this but the blade (red part) should be 4" long.
Prefer something made in USA but open to any suggestions.
Thanks!

ps. I just had to "trim" an existing non-load bearing wall stud by 1/4" and it was not fun.
All I could think of is how much easier it would have been if I had something like this.
Hence, the reason for my post.
View attachment 402460

That is a job for a Sawzall.

Joe
 

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G'day @cz71 , welcome to the forum.
 

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I just had to "trim" an existing non-load bearing wall stud by 1/4" and it was not fun.
All I could think of is how much easier it would have been if I had something like this.
Hence, the reason for my post.
View attachment 402460
I guess it's a little too late to know a little more about your daily activities? Are you like a carpenter, builder, handyman, etc? (and photos of your trimmed wall stud??)
 

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From a MFG part of view, a bit with a 4" cut length would require a tool at minimum of 6" long. We have found that most routers are not well suited for such a long bit and tend to destroy bearings in the armature. Plus, 4" of bit spinning at 20,000RPM sticking out???
 

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Why a router bit? Why not a sawsall or multi tool with plunge blade?

I have a Frued that's 5/8" diameter X 4" long, 1/2" shank, wasn't cheap, over $100..... but I don't think that's the most effective approach....maybe I'm missing something? 40 years on the job and no one's pulled out a router with a 4" long bit to notch an existing stud located within a wall....
 

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So, the bit I want does not exist?
With all the replies, it "appears" that nobody here has one or has used one or has seen one.
As I indicated - it is like chasing a unicorn in the router world.
all the best in your projects.
photos - we like to see photos of projects that have "issues" so that "we", the inexperienced, might learn some new tricks.
 

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Hi Folks, I'm trying to find a router bit that has a cutting length of four inches.
Something like this but the blade (red part) should be 4" long.
Prefer something made in USA but open to any suggestions.
Thanks!

ps. I just had to "trim" an existing non-load bearing wall stud by 1/4" and it was not fun.
All I could think of is how much easier it would have been if I had something like this.
Hence, the reason for my post.
View attachment 402460
I would check out the options of a "Portable Spindle Sander". Something like this. Triton Portable/Handheld Oscillating Spindle Sander -Rockler
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
photos - we like to see photos of projects that have "issues" so that "we", the inexperienced, might learn some new tricks.
It wasn't anything too crazy.

I was installing a wall safe that was 1/16" to 1/8" too wide to fit between the non-load bearing wall studs.
The studs were 3.5" deep and the sheetrock 1/2" thick.
Leaving me with 4" of depth that needed trimming.

And the trimming needed to go all the way up into the top and bottom "corners".
A very precise fit was needed and I didn't want to damage or replace any more drywall than I had to.

My sawzall would have worked if I had a blade that would go a max distance of 4". Not sure if my Sawzall has an adjustable plate or not.
But I'll be looking into my options someday.
Same goes for my jigsaw.
Any further than 4" and I'm hitting something I don't want to touch.
Any less than 4" and I'd need to break out the dremel & sander bit to hit whatever didn't get trimmed.

My dream tool would be the router bit I started the thread for, simply because it would have been the easiest & quickest option.
That, and it would come in handy for knocking glue & filler off the outside of speaker enclosures I sometimes build (home theater stuff).

With it needing to be so long, I can see how it would be dangerous. But I think these lightweight jobs would work fine for it if I "take it easy".
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I ended up using a plunge skillsaw to take off about 1/8" as much as I could.
Then, I used a cordless belt sander to take off what it didn't hit.
Then, I used a dremel with sandpaper drum to hit the small areas the above couldn't reach.
 

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I did the exact same thing - installing a new medicine cabinet in a 1957 home with 3/4" thick plaster walls. I chipped away about a 1/4" of the stud with a very sharp bench chisel. It wasn't pretty, but, it only took a few minutes. (knowing what tools I had available at the time, and my wood munching skills, a power tool never entered my mind). It took way less time to just "carve it out" than searching for another tool (power tool) to git-r-done. The end result is we got the job done and moved on to the rest of the list.
You might want to consider some quality wide sweep carving tools. Or - even the new 8" cordless chainsaw. They are both known for removing a lot of material rather quickly.
 
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