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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here's a bowl I made a couple of weeks ago. I got the inspiration from a cutting board that Scott Lewis did. This was really just an experiment but it turned out to be a keeper.

I used an 8/4 slab of Anigre with two bands of Jatoba and one of Maple for contrast. Steps:
  • Made a curved template of 1/4" MDF and cut a 1/4" curved slot/dado in it.
  • Used a band saw to cut down the middle of the slot
  • Used a trim bit to clean it up.
  • Glued up the 3 bands and clamped them between the two halves of the slab.
  • Used a router sled to flatten the assembly because it had warped a bit.
  • Used a forstner bit to hog out most of the bowl cavities
  • Then used two templates (one for each end and another for the middle) and a bowl cutting bit to finish it off.
  • Sanded and Minwax wipe-on to finish, sanding down to 600 grit in between coats and 0000 steel wool before the last coat.

Things I'd do differently: more bands but thinner - I actually broke a clamp on this one. I'd plane the slab flatter next time. And I would take more care in aligning the templates - if you look closely you can see where one was off by a little (about 1/16").
 

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for an experiment that turned out really well...
 

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Here's a bowl I made a couple of weeks ago. I got the inspiration from a cutting board that Scott Lewis did. This was really just an experiment but it turned out to be a keeper.

I used an 8/4 slab of Anigre with two bands of Jatoba and one of Maple for contrast. Steps:
  • Made a curved template of 1/4" MDF and cut a 1/4" curved slot/dado in it.
  • Used a band saw to cut down the middle of the slot
  • Used a trim bit to clean it up.
  • Glued up the 3 bands and clamped them between the two halves of the slab.
  • Used a router sled to flatten the assembly because it had warped a bit.
  • Used a forstner bit to hog out most of the bowl cavities
  • Then used two templates (one for each end and another for the middle) and a bowl cutting bit to finish it off.
  • Sanded and Minwax wipe-on to finish, sanding down to 600 grit in between coats and 0000 steel wool before the last coat.

Things I'd do differently: more bands but thinner - I actually broke a clamp on this one. I'd plane the slab flatter next time. And I would take more care in aligning the templates - if you look closely you can see where one was off by a little (about 1/16").
NIIIIIIICE!

Gotta tell you, I have no idea where that 1/16" is and I bet neither does anyone else. It looks terrific! And different. Excellent.
 

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I couldn't see it in the pics so I'm thinking it might not be that big of an issue.
 

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Phil you get the at-a-boy award for today. :smile: Great job.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the nice feedback. Since I am a perfectionist woodworker at heart, I have to be brutally honest about my flaws so here it is. It's true that a casual glance wouldn't turn it up but see the annotated picture for the clue.

I'm still not sure how it happened. I drew a top line, aligned the center template on that, then drew the outline of the center bowl. Then drew two lines 3/8" away from the side lines. aligned the side bowl template with that line and then drew the outline (once for each side). I also measured to make sure things were aligned and it all looked good. Somehow after I hogged out the bowls and repositioned templates with DS tape, I muffed it. Sigh.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
A tempting thing to copy.

How many coats of poly did you use? I'm just starting to try out wipe on ploy and not sure of how many coats.
It's kind of a fun project. Will do more in the future but it does take a while because of the extra glue ups per band.

This particular bowl was finished as follows:
100 grit (the end grain really needed it)
150 grit
220 grit
wipe on coat
220 grit
wipe on coat
320 grit
wipe on coat
600 grit
wipe on coat
buff with 0000 steel wool
buff with paste wax.

I believe the pictures are after the 3rd wipe on coat.

The second 220 grit sanding isn't necessary but I've found that it really helps in getting definition. Think of definition as how clear a reflection you get from the finished product.

Also, I really like the 3M flexible sanding sheets (can't call it paper). They allow me to get into the corners really well and they seem to last for ever.
 

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Thanks for the description. I'm struggling with the second coat, cant get it smooth. might have to go back and start again.

Had a strange thing happen to the paint yesterday. I cant get wipe on ploy here, so am cutting ordinary oil based poly with thinners. Done this a couple times from this can of poly without incident. Anyway, yesterday i used the stainless steel tea spoon to measure out the poly as I have each time, and as I poured it into the plastic cup, there was a thread of black in it, just like separate spoon was pouring used engine oil into the poly at the same time. I threw that away, went back to the tin and the whole tin was filled with black. It was like runny black molasses syrup. I had to throw the whole tin. Any ideas?
 

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Its a local company here in Cyprus. A big name island wide but will mean nothing to you.

I couldnt believe my eyes, it happened in seconds, the whole tin just changed and it was the difference in colour between brand new engine oil, and 100,000 miles old engine oil.
I spread some on a scrap piece of wood and thats just what it looked like, old oil mixed with water.
 
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