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Hi Folks. Is their anyone who uses a jig, or has boughten some type of router jig that will guide you through the repetitious cuts that is willing to share where you got it or did you build it? I want to make some shelving and was wanting to use my routers for dado's. I am a disabled vet I can't really get under the table saw and put a dado blade on nor make adjustments to it. If you would be so kind as to post a link, or give me a model name/number , or any info you give would be of great appreciation.

Thank you much...Michael
 

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Hi Michael and welcome

Fist, thank you for your service

You're probably talking about a dado jig - here's a link to a thread containing info from a member @MT Stringer with his rendering of an adjustable dado jig.

If you have any questions, I'm sure other will be along shortly to help you out.

Vince

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/49738-exact-width-dado-jig.html#post420450

And here's a link to a video demonstrating the use of on:

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/exact-width-dado-jig/
 

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My prefered set up for shelves is a straight edge, router and a straight bit. A short dado is the table saw and miter gauge, Rabbeting the edge a router and rabbet bit, table saw and dado or box cutter blade, or router table and rabbeting or straight bit, which ever works best for that particular operation.
There are tons of other jigs for routes on this forum.

Welcome to the forum, and thanks for asking the question.

Herb
 

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Welcome to the forum, Michael. Mike and Vince has given you the best method for your abilities. This will save you from trying to set up a dado blade in the table saw. A simple jig and you can route the dado(s) out wherever you want.

Bill
 

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Here is a jig I designed and built. It relies on a template bit (bearing at the top). It requires no external clamps. Once it's set for the wood you're using in the dados, you only have to turn the clamp, move the jig to the next line, turn the handle, then go again.

It's a "what you see is what you get" jig.

Ultimate Dado Jig - by Kelly @ LumberJocks.com ~ woodworking community
 

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G'day Michale, welcome to the forum.

I see that your question has been answered....


Happy routing.
 
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Welcome to the forum Michael.
 
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Welcome aboard, Michael.

I have used that jig to build more than 50 kitchen cabinets, liquor cabinet and other stuff. The work pieces fit perfectly every time.
 

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Welcome to the forum Michael . Sorry I don't have any input , but your in good hands with these guys .
Sorry to hear about not being able to install a dado blade in your table saw . I prefer that method ,but if I had too I could use my Festool router and use the Festool track for a guide . It's an expensive route to take going with Festool products . Great tools tough
 

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I have a Dado Wiz that follows a straight clamp. Particularly nice for stopped dados. For repetitive tasks, cut a chunk of ply to use to align the long track clamp. DO NOT lift the router out while it is still spinning. You fit a piece of scrap from material you're working with and fit it between a set of positioning pins to set an exact dado width. if you want to glue it in place, add a sheet or two of paper to allow for the glue. You use a half inch down cutting spiral bit. Very clean and accurate. Since you asked for a jig suggestion, it is something to consider. Rockler also has an exact fit dado guide, but it does not get raves from reviewers. Works with the same type of clamping track. Of course, there are other shop made jig designs that work quite well, but for router use, I really like my Dado Wiz, even with the ugly scars from violating the DO NOT LIFT THE ROUTER UNTIL IT COMPLETE STOPS. DadoWiz Self-Sizing Dado Guide

The third picture is of a shop built adjustable dado guide and a way to make it an exact fit.. For most dados that cut across the full width of the piece, a table saw Dado set is a top choice. You position the piece against the fence, cut all pieces for one dado, reset, cut another. matching set. For one or two pieces, however, give me the DadoWiz any day. Setting up a dado set is a real pain to me for just a cut or two. But if you must use a dado set, consider recording the sequence and sizes of your stack for certain thicknesses. There will be some variations, so a thickness gauge measuring each workpiece so you can easily make up a properly sized stack is needed. Sounds a bit fussy, but far easier than stacking and mounting, then unstacking, adding a ship, stacking, remounting and making another test cut, then repeat.
 

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I have a Dado Wiz that follows a straight clamp. Particularly nice for stopped dados. For repetitive tasks, cut a chunk of ply to use to align the long track clamp. DO NOT lift the router out while it is still spinning. You fit a piece of scrap from material you're working with and fit it between a set of positioning pins to set an exact dado width. if you want to glue it in place, add a sheet or two of paper to allow for the glue. You use a half inch down cutting spiral bit. Very clean and accurate. Since you asked for a jig suggestion, it is something to consider. Rockler also has an exact fit dado guide, but it does not get raves from reviewers. Works with the same type of clamping track. Of course, there are other shop made jig designs that work quite well, but for router use, I really like my Dado Wiz, even with the ugly scars from violating the DO NOT LIFT THE ROUTER UNTIL IT COMPLETE STOPS. DadoWiz Self-Sizing Dado Guide

The third picture is of a shop built adjustable dado guide and a way to make it an exact fit.. For most dados that cut across the full width of the piece, a table saw Dado set is a top choice. You position the piece against the fence, cut all pieces for one dado, reset, cut another. matching set. For one or two pieces, however, give me the DadoWiz any day. Setting up a dado set is a real pain to me for just a cut or two. But if you must use a dado set, consider recording the sequence and sizes of your stack for certain thicknesses. There will be some variations, so a thickness gauge measuring each workpiece so you can easily make up a properly sized stack is needed. Sounds a bit fussy, but far easier than stacking and mounting, then unstacking, adding a ship, stacking, remounting and making another test cut, then repeat.
I have to agree with you on the DadoWiz...does a great job and I love mine! However, not everyone has a jig like this.

If you have a Dado blade jig (which is simple to make) you can set up the stack, then, as suggested record the configuration for future, repeatable, set-ups.

If fussing with a Dado Blade is tedious for you then a simple jig and a guide bushing is the fastest way to achieve the end result.
 

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I have a nice dado blade set but hate to use it. Way too much setup time and then your TS is out of commission for regular cuts. If I had a second TS, maybe... Also, It's no good for making dados that are less than 1/4". An exact width dado router jig is great as it's quick and precise without having to measure. Pretty much foolproof (though fools can be amazingly ingenious...).
 

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I have a nice dado blade set but hate to use it. Way too much setup time and then your TS is out of commission for regular cuts. If I had a second TS, maybe... Also, It's no good for making dados that are less than 1/4". An exact width dado router jig is great as it's quick and precise without having to measure. Pretty much foolproof (though fools can be amazingly ingenious...).
That is the joy of using the Dadowiz. Really easy, exact. Do use the paper insert to allow a little space for the glue. There is a mark on the device you use to line it up with the top edge of the dado you're cutting. It is also terrific for making repeated, increasingly deep passes. You use a down spiral bit to keep the cut tearout-free.
 

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That is the joy of using the Dadowiz. Really easy, exact. Do use the paper insert to allow a little space for the glue. There is a mark on the device you use to line it up with the top edge of the dado you're cutting. It is also terrific for making repeated, increasingly deep passes. You use a down spiral bit to keep the cut tearout-free.
I just have a home made jig. It makes the joints tight and I tune them with a little sandpaper. I'll have to try the paper trick. I kind of have a love/hate thing going on with spirals - especially carbide. way to easy to break. Though HSS ones don't cost much.
 

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Give some serious consideration to mine. For the cost of a wood clamp and a pattern bit (bearing at the top), once set up for a project, it repeats, perfectly, every time and only takes about ten seconds to move to the next dado and secure it.

I've seen far more complex dado jigs, home made and commercial, and they still are no more accurate and are not as fast to use. Again, it can be seen at:

Ultimate Dado Jig - by Kelly @ LumberJocks.com ~ woodworking community
 

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I just have a home made jig. It makes the joints tight and I tune them with a little sandpaper. I'll have to try the paper trick. I kind of have a love/hate thing going on with spirals - especially carbide. way to easy to break. Though HSS ones don't cost much.
I just ordered a set of HSS spiral bits and they were really cheap. Given that I don't do all that much of that kind of thing, I think they will work for me. I broke one carbide bit and have no idea how it happened. I bought the up spirals for a box joint jig.
 

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Yeah. Makes sense. I think of HSS spirals as disposable bits. Use it until it dulls up and then buy a new one. Carbide spirals for box joints are asking for trouble 'cause you're taking a pretty big bite. My first carbide spiral failure was on a box joint. I've used HSS for that with no problem.
 
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