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I like the Bosch Colt in a plunge base....
 

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The DeWalt 611 pk is slightly larger and comes as fixed and plunge kit. Quite a few of us have it and like it. I believe that a few members also use the Trend T4 router which is the cheapest option but I believe that Trend even labels it a hobbyist quality router.
 

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Maybe a few Larry but the difference between the roughly 3 amps that the Dremel needs and the 5.6 that the Colt needs and the roughly 7.5 that the DW 611 needs should tell tell you what the difference is. The Dremel will be pushed as well as the need for 1/8" shank bits. The Colt, Trend, and DW 611 are actual routers, not carving tools that are able to use 1/4" shank router bits. It does seem to me that Steve Latta with Fine Woodworking uses a Dremel with plunge base for inlay work but I think there are more options than that.
 
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Has anyone used the Micro Plunge Base by microfence.com for the Dremel ?
Larry I have that base for one of my Dremels and I don't think that would be a good choice. Doing inlays isn't all that easy but with practice it gets better. So don't make it harder than it already is my using inferior tools.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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What are you inlaying and how small is it? I use a Dremel for doing guitar inlay and it's just right for Abalone, Mother of Pearl, and small exotic wood inlay. But if planned to do much larger than that the Dremel is just too light weight, as has been noted.

David

PS - I use the Dremel base offered by StewMac rather than a plunge type.
 

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What are you inlaying and how small is it? I use a Dremel for doing guitar inlay and it's just right for Abalone, Mother of Pearl, and small exotic wood inlay. But if planned to do much larger than that the Dremel is just too light weight, as has been noted.

David

PS - I use the Dremel base offered by StewMac rather than a plunge type.
David I have not seen that base before. Boy that is nice and looks to be well made. I only use mine for drilling small holes for scroll saw work.
 

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I've seen and used them all ( I teach with Steve at MASW and Chippendale School of Furniture in Scotland). Each have pro's and cons, it really depends on the type of inlay you wish to do. Long 1/8" table edging into hardwood and particle board, go for the bigger boys, quick signatures and small stone and she'll inlays, then the dremel. (I like my cordless dremel for these, quick and oh the hassle of plugging something in takes soooo long, it is good sometimes not to have a cord in the way.) I've even written a book about it. Hardwood Edging and Inlay for Curved Tables. (Admin - delete this if it is not appropriate to mention). I am presenting at this years AAW in Kansas and AWSF in Vegas on the subject, Alternative Inlays. - feel free to stop by to say hi and we can discuss more on your particulars.
 

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I've seen and used them all ( I teach with Steve at MASW and Chippendale School of Furniture in Scotland). Each have pro's and cons, it really depends on the type of inlay you wish to do. Long 1/8" table edging into hardwood and particle board, go for the bigger boys, quick signatures and small stone and she'll inlays, then the dremel. (I like my cordless dremel for these, quick and oh the hassle of plugging something in takes soooo long, it is good sometimes not to have a cord in the way.) I've even written a book about it. Hardwood Edging and Inlay for Curved Tables. (Admin - delete this if it is not appropriate to mention). I am presenting at this years AAW in Kansas and AWSF in Vegas on the subject, Alternative Inlays. - feel free to stop by to say hi and we can discuss more on your particulars.
When it's pertinent to the discussion it is allowed. You can also add a link in your signature to it. No one is forced to click on it, it's a matter of choice so it's allowed.
 

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You might also consider using a router plane. Veritas has a nice one with different sized right angle blades, and a special kit just for doing inlays. This brand comes in different sizes, and gives you extremely precise depth of cut. I think this would give you a level of control that can't be beat. The pictures include the small and large plane, and the inlay cutter attachment for the large plane. Basically, you use the cutter to cut outlines to an exact depth, then you use the right angle blade to clean it out to a controlled depth.
 

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