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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just built a new router table for my constant speed Porter-Cable router. It is working wonderfully except for one big issue. I am putting together rails and stiles for some cabinet doors and have noticed that the router slips down ever so slightly as I route multiple pieces. I have ensured the bit is secure and that the router itself is tightened as tight as I can get it by hand. Does anyone have any ideas on what could be causing this? I appreciate any help!
 

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Hey, Hesty; Welcome. You sound like you know your way around the shop, so when you say the router is cinched down tight i'm guessing that you've examined all the related parts(?)...
My original router, a craftsman was notorious for that issue, and that was using it handheld. I took it apart, cleaned out the accumulated fine sawdust, readjusted the locking mechanism, and it's been fine ever since...I never did figure out exactly why it was actually slipping.
 

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My original router, a craftsman was notorious for that issue
Yep, all I have is several older Craftsmans, and they would all slip. Seeing as how I keep all my bits at the same height and all in my router table, just did something to lock the ring in place - maybe Loctite, don't recall now, but whatever, definitely don't move now. Might not be what you want, but definitely cured the problem for me.
 

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Hi Hesty and welcome. I too have a Craftsman that slips and I think it's because the motor case is too slippery a plastic. I was going to try roughing it slightly to see if that helped but haven't gotten around to it. Maybe try cleaning it first and if that doesn't do it then a slight roughing.
 

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Clean the sawdust off the table and plate with a brush between every cut. Sometimes that accumulation will lift the piece just enough to mess with you. Another thing to try is placing a half inch rubber grommet in the collet and bottoming your bit on that. If you've been bottoming the bit against metal, that can cause it to shift slightly. Just some quickie fixes. I had a Rockler lift that crept. You could tighten it, but after awhile, it would start slipping again. Don't have that problem with the Triton unless I forget to lock it. Oops.
 

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The collet may need replacing. I’ve also had a problem where the bit would move when I was in the zone using it hard. I decided that the heat may be causing something to expand enough to allow the bit to slip. I found out by slowing down and giving the bit a chance to cool helped.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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Hesty: welcome to the forum. Can you tell us how your router is supported to the table? Is it attached to a plate or directly to the table? When you say the "router slips down", is it the motor in the housing, is it the entire router, or just the bit that is slipping? Is it a plunge base or fixed base that you are using?
 

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I agree with Dan get another router. A lot of people are having the same problem. Try these folks at CPO, they stand behind what they sell. I have bought quite a few tools from them. I had a router that was bad and they sent me another router that arrived the next day. I put the bad router in the box and shipped it back and they paid the shipping.

https://www.cpooutlets.com/routers-and-trimmers/routers-and-trimmers,default,sc.html
 

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I have just built a new router table for my constant speed Porter-Cable router. It is working wonderfully except for one big issue. I am putting together rails and stiles for some cabinet doors and have noticed that the router slips down ever so slightly as I route multiple pieces. I have ensured the bit is secure and that the router itself is tightened as tight as I can get it by hand. Does anyone have any ideas on what could be causing this? I appreciate any help!
What model router?
 

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A fixed speed porter cable would be the 690 family. Perhaps that is part of the problem if you are using a style and rail coping set, there may too much mass for the single speed router.

The Porter Cable 690 cutting height is set by rotating the motor inside the housing, then locking it down with a latch. You can set your bit height and zero out the indicator ring to see if the motor is rotating. The latch tension can be adjusted, so if the motor moves I would check latch tension first.

If the motor is moving and the latch is tight, then I think we’re back to too much mass on fixed speed router.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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Hesty,
I am very new to wood working. So what I have to say may be of no use to you. I have a router table (Bosch). I was having a very similar problem. I found out the small (C) Clip at the top of my adjusting shaft was slightly bent allowing the whole router to slip ever so slightly when using it. Before I discarded the router, I would clean every item that you can and check all parts pertaining to raising and lowing the router. Good luck
 

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If the router is actually slipping down, you've no doubt pulled your hair out by now...

But if it's not slipping and you've only "deduced" it's slipping because your cut is wavering off-course, then other things to consider...

Are you using a fingerboard on top of the piece to securely hold it down when passing the cutter...?
Is your table top flat across the entire surface area...? "North/East/South/West" and diagonal...?
Plate is on same planel with table top...?
Could you be exerting slight downward pressure on the opposite side of the panel while cutting...?

Maybe you've checked all this...

Welcome and good luck...
 
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upgrade routers

Hello Hesty
I agree with the folks above sears routers particularly their older routers have problems with their collects among a number of other issues. What makes router bits slip can be a collet that has been tightened too tight for years or the collets worn out or the router bit is undersize (cheaper router bits) built up dirt or dust.If you had a better router I would suggest you get a replacement collet but if you can find one chance are that would cost 2 or 3 times what your router is worth. It would be good if you could get a newer router even if it's used, just try and stay away from sears routers unless it's a newer model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Fixed!

So, what I ended up doing was removing the motor and "cleaning" it with sand paper. There were multiple black marks along the motor casing. Using the sandpaper, I removed the marks and scuffed up the rest of the housing. This , combined with using a pair of pliers to tighten the base to the housing, made the motor hold its position.

Thanks for all the great ideas. This is a wonderful forum for a wood worker and I look forward to many future conversations. Hope you all find time to spend in your shop. For me, it is my therapy which is desperately needed!

Hesty
 

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So, what I ended up doing was removing the motor and "cleaning" it with sand paper. There were multiple black marks along the motor casing. Using the sandpaper, I removed the marks and scuffed up the rest of the housing. This , combined with using a pair of pliers to tighten the base to the housing, made the motor hold its position.

Thanks for all the great ideas. This is a wonderful forum for a wood worker and I look forward to many future conversations. Hope you all find time to spend in your shop. For me, it is my therapy which is desperately needed!

Hesty
Be careful tightening with pliers. I broke the ears the bolt goes through years ago doing the same thing.
 

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I just received the latest copy of Popular Woodworking Magazine and they address a possible solution for bits that move.

The writer claims that one of the reasons bits move is that there is too much friction between the collet and tapered shaft. He claims that a little lubrication between the two parts will allow the collet to tighten further.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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Glad you solved the problem.

As for Sears routers, I began with a nice Craftsman, and as a plunge router it was nice, but as a fixed base or in the table, forget it! They seem to have good designs all except for one hangup, and it's usually the depth adjustment. Either too tight or too loose and just plain didn't work, and my frustration with them finally just wore me out. They changed that design and at the same time also changed the vac port design. So they fixed one problem and created another! Last one I bought was returned the next day because I couldn't stand the cheap vac port attachment it had, I knew it would break within a few uses, and the motor was making a strange noise and didn't seem to accelerate right. I tried another in the store and it did the same. I didn't trust it, so I bit the bullet and just bought three DeWalt routers and I've never been happier. Granted, the fixed base doesn't even have a vac port (why, DeWalt, why???) but it's ok, I'll solve that problem. As for depth adjustment and locking in place, these are super easy and second to none! I'm done with Craftsman.
 
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