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Hi new to the forum so go easy on me please :laugh2: John here from the UK

Seen one or two videos where folk are removing the depth stop gauge on a plunge router and inserting a threaded bolt and coupler so the router can be raised and lowered from the top of the table.

Is this a good way to do it or does it put too much pressure on one side of the router which may cause the parts to snap off?

Also the videos appear to imply that I need to drill a hole thru the base to connect the coupler. Does anyone know of a good video that explains how to do this in detail? The ones I've seen don't explain it very well.

Thanks
John
 

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Theo
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I find it easier, faster, cheaper, to just lift the router plate off the table router and all. If I want to change to a different bit I have a plate, complete with router and new bit, to pop in.
 
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I had my large makita router fitted up that way. It even comes with a long phillips head bolt. All you have to do is carefully mark the underside of the plate where the bolt will pass through.
drill a hole just wide enough to let the threaded part slide through.
widen the top side of the hole to allow the phillips head to sink below the top surface. and youre done.
i got fed up with the phillips head quite quickly though as the screwdriver was hard work lifting the weight of the router. So I made my own bolt with a 10 mm nut on the end and used a socket set speed wrench. That worked very well untill I made my own under table lift
 

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Welcome to the forum John. I'll pass on this one as I went straight to building my router table but also installed a lift. The last time I looked the Jess Em Rout-R-Lift II was $149.00and that was cheap enough not to have to deal with opening the door under the router or lifting the assembly up to make changes. Now it may not be that way on some but I just figured I'd have more accurate control with a finely built lift and have been happy with it since I installed it. See https://www.amazon.com/JessEm-Rout-R-Lift-Router-Diameter-Motors/dp/B004U7B6IE/ref=asc_df_B004U7B6IE/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309813767497&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16105954584432739742&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9008932&hvtargid=pla-492044444569&psc=1 Woodcraft has it as this price as well.
 

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I find it easier, faster, cheaper, to just lift the router plate off the table router and all. If I want to change to a different bit I have a plate, complete with router and new bit, to pop in.
The lift isn't for changing the bit it's for getting the bit to the exact height. Without a lift, it's a matter of trial and error, with a lift you simply put a piece of wood next to the bit and raise or lower it until the cutter is exactly where you want it. When using a rail and stile set this can be the difference is doing a good job and a botched job.
 

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The first shots show how I modified a Ryobi router for above table adjustment and the other two shots show how I made a simple foot operated lift.
 

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They look great. Do you still use the router lever to lock the depth in place or do you just rely on the lift to hold it in place?
I always lock it in place as well, one thing I did that's recommended is to remove the springs for the plunge mechanism, it makes it much easier to wind up and down.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Welcome to the forum, John! When you get a minute complete your profile with first name so it clears the N/a in the side panel. Add your location, as well.

David
 
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