Router Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking around for a router planer jig and saw a ton of different options on how you could make one. I was curious if any of you had suggestions on the best choice for a DIY option?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,831 Posts
I haven't made one but use ski's for small stuff. I have seen many variations of the same idea on a dedicated router planer. I would pick one that is solid and use what you can that you have on hand that will be sturdy and where what you have to buy is at a reasonable price. Several show them made of 2x material with the router sitting between the bridge able to easily slide from side to side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm looking for something that will flatten the wood without the use of an actual planer. I'm new to a lot of this and I'm trying to figure out what I can do with my router since I don't have a jointer or planer.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
679 Posts
I was curious if any of you had suggestions on the best choice for a DIY option?
I would say that whatever fits your size of router and what projects you will be doing
would be your best choice.

more information of what your project is would help (photos would help even more).
I am thinking you want to make a Router Sled ?? like for flattening slabs of wood.
google it: (also many videos on YouTube on Router Sleds)

398312

and use the correct bits for the job.
398313
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
The problem that you are going to have is that it's really not going to work, Each time the bit goes over the board it is going to leave an edge. You can hand plane the edge off or try to sand it off but with mixed results. What John showed you would be the best bet. But in the end, a planner is the way to go. The planner will give you a lot of flexibility with your projects. You don't need a jointer just a planner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is the general idea I was going for. I've seen a bunch online so I know there are options but wanted to see if anyone had opinions on them. I really don't have a project for it right now although my parents want me to make them a small live edge table where this could be handy. I like to try and research and learn as much as I can before I get to a project and figured the router forum would be the place to go to.

This is why I was looking, I knew what he did was just 1 option but DIY vs $900 is a big difference if its not a crappy DIY version.

I was curious if any of you had suggestions on the best choice for a DIY option?
I would say that whatever fits your size of router and what projects you will be doing
would be your best choice.

more information of what your project is would help (photos would help even more).
I am thinking you want to make a Router Sled ?? like for flattening slabs of wood.
google it: (also many videos on YouTube on Router Sleds)

View attachment 398312
and use the correct bits for the job.
View attachment 398313
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
679 Posts
Ben - please enlighten us to why you need this jig - and some photos of the material you want to flatten. what size will the table be, what size is the live edge slabs, etc etc etc.
that may narrow down the replies to be more accurate to your question.
and what motorized sanders do you have ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
919 Posts
I was looking around for a router planer jig and saw a ton of different options on how you could make one. I was curious if any of you had suggestions on the best choice for a DIY option?

Thanks in advance.
Check out Harry Sinclair's Router Skiis. I made a set. With a small add-on I was able to use one of the skiis as a router trammel to route circles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,998 Posts
The type pictured above will leave skid marks, every time. because the router is top heavy and the cutter is wide, it will rock as you push it back and fore across the slot.
Rods through the router base (skis) will work on narrow stuff though, but you need strong steel and a wide base.

If youre thinking about a large slab of wood over 2 ft across you are going to need some serious gear to get it smooth on the one pass. If youre just looking to knock the rough edges off and then do a LOT of sanding, as shown above will work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
The type pictured above will leave skid marks, every time. because the router is top heavy and the cutter is wide, it will rock as you push it back and fore across the slot.
The way I've commonly seen that used, instead of the router's original base plate a basic router table plate is used. Enough stability for professional use.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
679 Posts
Ben - start collecting plexiglass when you find scraps laying around. especially in the 1/4 - 3/8" thickness.
it only takes a few minutes to make a custom base plate for a particular project.
eventually, if you are like a lot of us, you will have half a dozen (or more) routers, a coffee can full of bits, and a drawer full of assorted size base plates and jigs.
have fun - be safe.
(a router bit spinning at 25,000 RPMs WILL leave a mark !!!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,045 Posts
While I haven't tried a router sled I have to say that I can definitely see the value if you are doing slabs and much wider pieces. That said I don't see it replace a jointer or planer for everyday use. Let me explain, I don't see how you have much control over consistent thickness of multiple parts and could spend a considerable amount of time trying to do so. And then the time thing, is it worth the amount of time for smaller projects to flatten and dimension your wood? These are the considerations you'll need to consider. I thought about building a sled but have yet to have a reason to as I have both a joint and a planer. That said, there are many ways that a router table and a planer can flatten and square your wood to the dimensions you want. Another consideration is the cost of building the sled, buying a larger router if needed, and the cost of the bit itself.

Just some thoughts. I do buy all my wood from my local wood yard where they have rough sawn and kiln dried it. It is way cheaper then you'll get in the hardware stores and generally much better quality. It also save you money if you use a lot of it thus paying or help paying for your planer. For large slab work you'll still need a sled but I don't personally see it replacing a planer. Just another opinion.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top