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BOBandRICK. I finally found that your show is on Fri. at 1pm so I'll be seeing you guys more often. My question: On your show I notice that your router plates are not secured to the table but just sit in a recess. How does this work out for you? It seems so simple when it comes to adjusting or changing bits. I'm fairly new to routing and some research before buying and selected the PC 690 with both bases. Now, the more I read, the more it seems that I should have bought more power. Thanks DON
 

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I've been using gravity and a nice neat fit with my router plates, for years. I was sceptical when I first saw the technique, but it works just fine. I would say, ensuring your router table is made of something that wont expand/contract; you can make the plate a snug fit - it wont go anywhere.

Having said all that, 3 years ago I bought a Triton Router that let's me change bits above the table anyway! (See my signature pic on the left)
 

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The plate is held down by the different fences and jigs. It sits slightly above the surface of the table (at least mine does.).

It is a good simple efficient system.

You have to get one of Bob's rulers.
 

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The work piece is being cut on the plate so it will always cut where intended. I just went into the shop and measured it .027 not quite 1/32.

The distance from the front and rear of the plate to the table edges is about 2 inches so the plate takes up most of the tables width.
 

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Just a"newbie", but my home built table has a "loose" plate and is held down by the fence , but it has been made to be level with the table, and it is acrylic,actually part of a golf cart windshield, works great !. Frank Lee
 

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As best as I can tell mine just stays there by gravity, never thought about it going anywhere. But then to I am very new at this so I have seen very little of what can happen. I've never heard of one coming out.
 

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That's the great thing about this forum, even if the original question is 4 yrs old if you bump it someone will respond with an up to date answer.:D

it also proves that members really go back into the archives to search for answers.

James
 

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I also have Oak-Park base plates that sit slightly above the Oak-Park table top. The weight of the attached router keeps the base plate in place, but keeping sawdust (router dust?) out of the table recess is essential. The only time I have a problem is with a glue joint bit. I found that on narrow test pieces the cuts lined up perfectly but on pieces wider than the nominal 6 inches (15 cm) the cuts did not line up. I was putting pressure on the edge of the piece farthest from the bit. If I use a push block that puts downward pressure over or near the bit there is no problem.

I was keeping my hand as far from the bit as I could in order to avoid putting a glue joint type groove in my fingers and hand. I already did that once with a straight bit that took about two months to heal, and left a scar on my left forefinger. Somehow no joint damage was done, but the finger is still (about 14 months later) still somewhat stiff.

It is good to see "old" issues revisited.

To all members and all lurkers, may this season be one of peace, renewal and hope.
 

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I also have Oak-Park base plates that sit slightly above the Oak-Park table top. The weight of the attached router keeps the base plate in place, but keeping sawdust (router dust?) out of the table recess is essential. The only time I have a problem is with a glue joint bit. I found that on narrow test pieces the cuts lined up perfectly but on pieces wider than the nominal 6 inches (15 cm) the cuts did not line up. I was putting pressure on the edge of the piece farthest from the bit. If I use a push block that puts downward pressure over or near the bit there is no problem.

I was keeping my hand as far from the bit as I could in order to avoid putting a glue joint type groove in my fingers and hand. I already did that once with a straight bit that took about two months to heal, and left a scar on my left forefinger. Somehow no joint damage was done, but the finger is still (about 14 months later) still somewhat stiff.

It is good to see "old" issues revisited.

To all members and all lurkers, may this season be one of peace, renewal and hope.
Hi mftha,

First off, I wish you a happy and safe holiday season too. :)

To help with your alignment issue. Try using a feather board on top of the work piece and one on the side. This will help keep the work piece down to the bit and against the fence. :)

Hope this helps. :)
 

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Maybe it is old issues new guys, especially like me that can't find what we're looking for with a "search". Or maybe we wonder if a new spin has been put on the same old question. Sometimes I'm not real sure what the question is to start out
 

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HI Guys

Just my 2 cents :)

Most of the RWS are dated in the 1998 ,that's 10 years ago :) many things have change since that time ,, router lifts,routers that come with them built it, etc...many don't pop the router out of the table to install or adjust the bit,,,,it still works well and many have the Oak-Park setup...the routers don't lift out easy the norm and the plates stay in the pocket the norm... :) once it's in place it's in place and once the fence is in place it's not going to jump out of the pocket :) it's like a hinge pocket it's not the screws that take the load it the pocket they are in...the norm...the screws are just part of the holding device and a small part at that.. :)

The router plate works the same way but because the fence is over the plate no screws are needed..the same thing is true when you have 15lbs. of router holding the plate down and in place, the pocket takes the load if you are using the router without a fence in place..

Many of the new plates come with Allen screws to adjust the plate to keep it level if the pocket is off just a little bit, some come with earth magnets for a base for the set screws and to help hold the base plate true in the pocket..

The CMT router table comes with a cross bars to hold the plate down but it's over kill item I think... :) it also as one of the biggest router mounting plate on the market...

=====
 

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HI Nick

Yep, me too :)

It's made so well I can't even get a business card in the gap.. :)

=========
I just set my CMT plate in place don't you?
 

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Thanks Ken. Actually as a result of some sort of brain failure (I hope fatigue- or muscle relaxant or back pain killer caused) I did not mention the tall fence with attached verticle feather board that I built after the fact.
 
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