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Discussion Starter #1
I'm fairly new to router and wonderd what you wear for protection? The idea of a broken bit spinning out of control towards my body is a bit unnerving. I do have a fave shield but not much other than a cloth apron for body protection
 

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Eye protection is mandatory.
I have had a bit disintegrate on me. Luckily unharmed, but the experience is not one I could recommend. Never take a chance with your eyes, Theyre the only set youre going to get.
Fingers also need to be kept well away from the cutters. If youre using small pieces of wood that put your fingers within afoot of the blade, use push blocks.

heres the top of the range push block, but any home made push block is better than nothing.
 

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My sister works at a prison in Alberta and sent me a bullet proof vest . Joking lol , but the thought crossed my mind .
I wear a hard hat with safety glasses and sometimes use the shield. It also has hearing protection on it , those ear muff things . I have a dust mask rated for H2S .
As for my chest , just my Tshirt under my bins . Maybe I should have kept my roost guard from my dirt biking days ?

I have heard of people dying from injuries from a bit breaking , but it's pretty rare and no one here's complained about dying from it yet
 

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Rick switch out the canisters on that mask to OV (organic vapor).

First rule if you are worried about bits hurting you is don't buy the Chinese ones. Buy a quality brand like Whiteside, Freud, CMT, Amana, Infinity, or Lee Valley. A bit won't come shooting out of a collet without warning. First they'll start to slip a little and ruin your cut. When that happens get a new collet. As said, wear safety glasses and hearing protection. Like Rick said, injuries from damaged bits are pretty rare. I don't remember a member telling us that happened in the 6+ years I've been on the forum.
 
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I'm fairly new to router and wonderd what you wear for protection? The idea of a broken bit spinning out of control towards my body is a bit unnerving. I do have a fave shield but not much other than a cloth apron for body protection
there's more you can do...
add safety glasses behind that shied and wear your eye protection...
change to a heavy canvass or leather apron...
avoid no name Asian bits...
read these PDF'S...

..
 

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Doug
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If you drop a bit on the concrete floor, throw it away. You might have damaged it and can't necessarily tell. I would apply this rule to saw blades with carbide tips as well.

Inspect your collets, make sure no cracks. They are a 'consumable item'

I have had straight cutters come loose and "drill" up through the wood, if your hand is over the bit you might find it....

I broke a carbide straight cutter plowing a groove once, it was surprising, but the broken piece didn't go anywhere.
 

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Always respect your tools but never fear them.

Always be mindful of a bits performance...when sound and feel are different, in any tool, stop and examine.

Comfort-wear is also important. Can't go into the shop dressed like a goalie...

Protect eyes, face, fingers at all costs...suede or canvas apron a plus...
 
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I'm a fan of leather aprons. As I mentioned recently, when my son was in woodworking class in college, he had a thin strip of maple to kick back from the table saw and strike him in the stomach. He was wearing a leather apron, and from the size of the bruise, I think that it may have saved him from being impaled.
 

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I always use safety glasses in the shop for all power tool operations and also any striking and hammering operations. If you can not control the piece of wood without getting your hands too close to the bit, then you need a way of holding it. Jigs are your best friend. I do a lot of pattern routing on parts for bow saws that I make which you could not hold in your hands. The jigs allow me to have my hands well away from the bit but give me excellent control of the piece. I always buy quality bits and have never had one come apart.

Regards Bob
 

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I stay away from router bits with a 1/4" shank when ever possible unless it is super light duty work (Small Trim Router).

Even with the 1/2" shank breakage can happen but with a little common sense this can be avoided. I only buy quality bits that are made with C3 or C4 carbide (welded or insert) or solid carbide.

My work on solid surface products does put a strain on the longevity of cutting tools so I constantly look the bit over every time I pick up the router to use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Let's say all has failed and now you're faced with a exploding bit. What would you want to be wearing?
 
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