Router Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to know if I buy a speed control in the US (120 volts), how can I use in 220 volts.And also if anyone knows any routers working in 220 that are sold in US.
Thanks for all the opinions and help!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi sergio

Sorry to say you are SOL on the speed control box,,,:( Porter Cable makes a 220 volt router but it's not the same as your 220 volt setup..
You may want to check out some of the UK outlets for a router..(Trend )

======

I need to know if I buy a speed control in the US (120 volts), how can I use in 220 volts.And also if anyone knows any routers working in 220 that are sold in US.
Thanks for all the opinions and help!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
Sergio

Argentina uses mains electricity at 220 to 240 volts 50Hz (like most of Europe, such as here in the UK) whilst USA and Canada use 120 volts at 60Hz. The frequency (Hz = Hertz) is significant as not all electronic speed controllers built to work on 60Hz will work on the lower frequency of 50Hz. I've had success using some American sourced power tools such as the Porter-Cable 691 router bought in the USA and run through a British site transformer which converts 230 volts AC to 110 volts, although the frequency remains the same. This 3.3kVA transformer is big enough for almost any power tools you wish to attach and is the sort of box I'm talking about, although the weight might make shipping prohibitively expensive
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Sergio

Argentina uses mains electricity at 220 to 240 volts 50Hz (like most of Europe, such as here in the UK) whilst USA and Canada use 120 volts at 60Hz. The frequency (Hz = Hertz) is significant as not all electronic speed controllers built to work on 60Hz will work on the lower frequency of 50Hz. I've had success using some American sourced power tools such as the Porter-Cable 691 router bought in the USA and run through a British site transformer which converts 230 volts AC to 110 volts, although the frequency remains the same. This 3.3kVA transformer is big enough for almost any power tools you wish to attach and is the sort of box I'm talking about, although the weight might make shipping prohibitively expensive
I have a question for you Phil. In Canada and the US we get 220v by connecting 2 different 110v leads that are out of phase with each other. Is the 230v circuit you have the same or is it a single lead (hot wire) and a neutral. In our 220v circuit, we don't need a neutral unless we want to take a 110 volt lead off the circuit for an oven light, plug-in on the stove for a coffe pot, etc. Otherwise, we just have 2 hot conductors and a bare ground wire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I’m originally from Argentina living for long time in the US. As it’s already said the voltage in Argentina, is 220-240, bring it down to 110 is very simple with a transformer and they are easy to find locally.
The problem with electronics is the frequency and I mention this because I have taken over the years some electronic equipment that work OK and some others that do work but kind of erratic, those having a electronic timers have problems, they all run slow and I assume that is because the clocks and timers are controlled with the freq 60 Hz. US and 50 Hz Argentina. for example a washer or dryer when it says will take 20 minutes will be about 24, not much of a problem. This was explained to me that way by an LG support technician.
Regular routers work ok, I took one there years ago and is doing ok, I guess the electronic speed control should be the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
I have a question for you Phil. In Canada and the US we get 220v by connecting 2 different 110v leads that are out of phase with each other. Is the 230v circuit you have the same or is it a single lead (hot wire) and a neutral. In our 220v circuit, we don't need a neutral unless we want to take a 110 volt lead off the circuit for an oven light, plug-in on the stove for a coffe pot, etc. Otherwise, we just have 2 hot conductors and a bare ground wire.
A European 220 to 240 volt supply (harmonised to 230 volts, i.e. within the +/- 10% tolerance permitted) requires 2 wires, a live and a neutral and is normally obtained by taking a single phase from a 3-phase 380 to 415 volt supply (415 in the UK, 380 volts elsewhere) together with a neutral. In reality the neutral to earth often tests at 20 to 40 volts, especially in old properties. Domestic properties in many European countries are supplied only with a single phase supply whilst commercial properties often have a 3-phase supply, although much of the grid here in the UK is 3-phase. As a matter of interest the site transformers we use in the UK for work on building sites, etc are centre tapped and thus have two hot conductors at 55+ volts and 55- volts respectively
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
20,113 Posts
G'day Sergio

Welcome to the router forum.

Thank you for joining us
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
A European 220 to 240 volt supply (harmonised to 230 volts, i.e. within the +/- 10% tolerance permitted) requires 2 wires, a live and a neutral and is normally obtained by taking a single phase from a 3-phase 380 to 415 volt supply (415 in the UK, 380 volts elsewhere) together with a neutral. In reality the neutral to earth often tests at 20 to 40 volts, especially in old properties. Domestic properties in many European countries are supplied only with a single phase supply whilst commercial properties often have a 3-phase supply, although much of the grid here in the UK is 3-phase. As a matter of interest the site transformers we use in the UK for work on building sites, etc are centre tapped and thus have two hot conductors at 55+ volts and 55- volts respectively
Thanks for the info Phil. Our average commercial buildings also have 3 phase power as it is much more efficient but also more costly to install than single phase. It is most commonly supplied as 208v, 480v, and 600v. I don't understand how you use +55v and -55v power. I feel like I am starting to hijack this thread so I hope that others are as interested in learning how the other side of the oceans power their tools as much as I am.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,117 Posts
I don't understand how you use +55v and -55v power.
Hi Charles

The potential difference between +55 volts and -55 volts is 110 volts, which is what our industrial site power tools run on. I've found that most 115 volt US tools with universal motors will run on that quite happily unless they have some sort of frequency-based speed controller. The UK and Ireland are probably the only places in the EU which have 110 volt power tools on building sites (and other restricted areas such as railway lines, etc). My understanding is that if one live is exposed and you accidentally touch it the 55 volts earthing through your body cannot kill you, but as some people are killed every year testing 9 volt bicycle batteries on their tongues, maybe I'm wrong there. So it is supposedly intrinsically safer. Maybe. The rest of the EU, however, doesn't play that game and instead insists on the standard 220 volts (live + neutral) with an RCD to protect each circuit. We normally get an MCB or RCD per circuit on larger transfornmers so maybe the health and safety brigade/insurance brigade are a bit more belt and braces here in the UK. What I do know is that it costs me more to buy some of my work tools and that not everything is available in 110 volt form.

The only other thing I can say about 110 volt site tools is that they are useable outside safely when it's a bit damp with minimal risk of electrocution. By that I don't mean standing up to your oxsters in water core-drilling a wall in the middle of a monsoon, but certainly I've been out there jigsawing a hardwood shop frontage to scribe it in whilst the rain is spitting and the pavement is still wet. So far, at least, without problems!

I suppose that it's the transient nature of construction work (be it domestic kitchen fitting, commercial bar fitting or building a skyscraper) which means that most of the problems will occur in the extension cables which do tend to get dragged all over the place, run-over by trucks, etc rather than problems in the tools themselves

Regards

Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Phil and Chuck

???????????????????????

==========

Hi Charles

The potential difference between +55 volts and -55 volts is 110 volts, which is what our industrial site power tools run on. I've found that most 115 volt US tools with universal motors will run on that quite happily unless they have some sort of frequency-based speed controller. The UK and Ireland are probably the only places in the EU which have 110 volt power tools on building sites (and other restricted areas such as railway lines, etc). My understanding is that if one live is exposed and you accidentally touch it the 55 volts earthing through your body cannot kill you, but as some people are killed every year testing 9 volt bicycle batteries on their tongues, maybe I'm wrong there. So it is supposedly intrinsically safer. Maybe. The rest of the EU, however, doesn't play that game and instead insists on the standard 220 volts (live + neutral) with an RCD to protect each circuit. We normally get an MCB or RCD per circuit on larger transfornmers so maybe the health and safety brigade/insurance brigade are a bit more belt and braces here in the UK. What I do know is that it costs me more to buy some of my work tools and that not everything is available in 110 volt form.

The only other thing I can say about 110 volt site tools is that they are useable outside safely when it's a bit damp with minimal risk of electrocution. By that I don't mean standing up to your oxsters in water core-drilling a wall in the middle of a monsoon, but certainly I've been out there jigsawing a hardwood shop frontage to scribe it in whilst the rain is spitting and the pavement is still wet. So far, at least, without problems!

I suppose that it's the transient nature of construction work (be it domestic kitchen fitting, commercial bar fitting or building a skyscraper) which means that most of the problems will occur in the extension cables which do tend to get dragged all over the place, run-over by trucks, etc rather than problems in the tools themselves

Regards

Phil
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Thanks for the explanation Phil. Sorry I didn't respond right away. Been shoveling snow for the last 2 days-again. I guess Bob doesn't share our enthusiasm for electrical systems. I'll let it go at that last explanation.
Regards,
Charles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all for your answers and I´m glad it opened up some kind of debate.I´ll be back as soon as I give all a thorough reading.(have to run to office right now).
I just wanted to express my gratitude to the forum members,and also to those making it possible for us to participate.

Best regards,Sergio.
 

·
Premium Member
Retired since June 2000
Joined
·
15,065 Posts
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top