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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,
I picked up a 27"x16" cast iron top some time ago with the intention of mounting it on the end of my old cabinet saw. I knew a few modifications would be needed at the time of purchase since the hole patterns don't match up and my saw is 28" deep (1" spacer block would be needed to close the gap). My saw also has the shorter 30' round rails so I'd have to remove the existing cast iron wing on the right to stay inside the rail length.

Now that I'm ready to get started, all these modifications lead me to believe it would make more sense to just incorporate the top into an out feed table for the saw, which is on the build list regardless. How feasible would it be to get the tops flush so I have a larger working area for the router table? The frame would be on casters and I'd have a few layers of MDF, or maybe some MDF with a melamine board on top for some slickness.

Any thoughts on positioning? Just looking at the top, I'd definitely like some more room on the front side (or 'south' of the router plate) but more space all around would be welcome. I haven't settled on the exact size of my outfeed table yet but assume the router table can be configured in any direction.
 

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Hello and welcome to the forums Patrick...
We're happy you found us...

the outfeed sounds most practical...

what TS do you have???
pictures of the backside would be nice...
you can upload pictures fron the device you are posting from...

BTW...
We do welcome all questions on about any subject you can come up w/ too....
Not only that, we excel at spending your money...
 

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I did something similar for my router table. The only difference is that it is not part of my outfeed table. I used 2 pieces of angle iron attached to frame of the bench. I drilled and tapped angle iron and used bolts with a lock nut to adjust the level of the table. The weight of the cast iron is more than enough to hold the table in place. If you look at the top left and right of the second picture you can see two of the bolts. Makes it very easy to adjust the level of the table.
 

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Doug
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Definitely going to need to see a picture of the back side of the saw. Also, is this going to be a permanent install, or will you need to make it removable? What type and location of dust collection do you use on the saw? Will that get in the way of your working on the router table?

I see a bunch of 1-1/2 inch angle iron in your future...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I should have attached these photos in the original post, plus a sketchup drawing if I had those skills.

The pic with the tape shows the space I have to work with on the wing, assuming that plate is removed. It just doesn't seem like the best location with the all the modifications involved for this particular situation.

The other photos give you a look at the back side of the saw. The protrusion on the right is for the original blade guard now sitting in my attic and I'm not sure about the one that's about in line with the blade. I'll have to remove both of those to get the out feed table up against the saw, but I won't be able to connect the two tops because of the rear locking mechanism on my fence. I do use sleds which of course means runners on the outfeed table need to be and stay properly aligned. My thoughts were to locate other points beneath the rear rail where I could lock the saw and outfeed table together. I'd at least allow some extra width at the beginning of the miter track on the outfeed table to allow minor misalignments, but long sleds and sled rides onto the table might not be an option.

Let me go ahead and put it out there that I really like the fence and wouldn't consider swapping it out for another solution. Longer rails would be nice and the etchings on my rails ca be difficult to read at my age (50) but the fence itself is rock solid, holds true, and I just love the design. I'm the second owner of the saw and bought it from the Jr. High shop teacher that procured full classroom of 3 phase PM equipment when the school opened. He told me they closed shop class down in the mid 70s and the equipment was just used by the maintenance crew (and theatre) until the school closed and he hauled it off to his garage. He was still trying to figure out a solution for all his 3 phase machines (w only 110v running to his garage) when I bought one of his two cabinet saws.

Long post...sorry. Anyway, I like the idea of having a router table on the out feed side of my saw and it would be nice to expand the surface area for routing if I can keep it all flush with the router table surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I did something similar for my router table. The only difference is that it is not part of my outfeed table. I used 2 pieces of angle iron attached to frame of the bench. I drilled and tapped angle iron and used bolts with a lock nut to adjust the level of the table. The weight of the cast iron is more than enough to hold the table in place. If you look at the top left and right of the second picture you can see two of the bolts. Makes it very easy to adjust the level of the table.
Hi Bob, I see what you did here and it looks like an excellent solution for a longer (and flush) runway. Since my table is only 16" deep, I would like to add some area on front side if possible. Angle iron may also be a solution for that as well.
 

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You can go too long for a table because if your lumber has any warp in it it will bridge across the table and the longer the table the worse that gets. We try and discourage putting a router in a table saw wing since one eventually gets in the way of the other but it looks like you are limited in space. Another option if that's the case is using a Workmate for a base and just lay a panel on it with cleats that fit around the outside of the Workmate when it is opened all the way up. That way you can store the top against a wall and fold up the Workmate or use it for some other job. That might be a simpler solution.
 

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I like the idea of having a router table on the out feed side of my saw and it would be nice to expand the surface area for routing if I can keep it all flush with the router table surface.
independent fence for the RT...
mount two of theses type brackets or similar to the saw base and build from there...
a gap betewwn the two tables won't hurt a thing...
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Stick, I've been quietly browsing this site for several weeks enjoying all the entertaining and informative posts from active members like yourself. For better or worse, 2020 has turned out to be a great year for me to get my shop a few steps closer to what I've always had in mind, including a good router table setup. Once I get this table figured out I'll probably start shopping for a router with more power than the DeWalt 611 that I used in my old shop table.
 

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Hi, really neat to get your shop set up. Took a long time for mine to come together too. A friend of mine has a small table saw that he surrounded with a formica top that was level with the top and it served him pretty well.

As to routers, for the table I strongly suggest the Triton TRA001. 3.25hp, built in lift, good air circulation designed in. Too big for me to handle for hand held use but your 611 will likely handle most of that work. I'm very happy with mine. I popped for a Woodpecker heavy duty plate pre drilled for the Triton. There are plenty of good routers, but there are things like when you crank the Triton all the way up to change bits, it locks the shaft so it won't start. It has other safety locks as well, for me that means if I haven't used it for awhile and forget something, I can't hurt myself. I bought a table and top, but if I were doing it again, I'd build my own table.

Stick some time ago suggested adding a tube (snorkle) and attaching it to the bottom of the router so only clean air goes up through the router, reducing accumulation of sawdust in the works. My two cents. Having a good router table changes the way you work and expands your possibilities while also reducing your risk of injury. Your fence will be a very important part of your table. I like a high fence so I can hold up vertical pieces for end routing.

For some serious help on how to get the most from a router table, I don't think you can beat going to youtube and looking up the videos by Marc Sommerfeld. He promotes his products with a light hand, but was a cabinet maker earlier on and is technique is elegantly simple and straightforward. He is using a Triton in his table so you can see how he works it at the same time.

BTW, I don't get a toaster for recommending the Triton or his videos. They are just the clearest on how to do a wide variety of cabinets with the router. I like them so much I bought the set and watch the most appropriate one when I'm about to take on something I haven't done or haven't done an awhile.

I also like the way he uses squared up pieces of MDF to guide his workpieces through the router. Simple, elegant technique.

My 35 cents worth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi, really neat to get your shop set up. Took a long time for mine to come together too. A friend of mine has a small table saw that he surrounded with a formica top that was level with the top and it served him pretty well.

As to routers, for the table I strongly suggest the Triton TRA001. 3.25hp, built in lift, good air circulation designed in. Too big for me to handle for hand held use but your 611 will likely handle most of that work. I'm very happy with mine. I popped for a Woodpecker heavy duty plate pre drilled for the Triton. There are plenty of good routers, but there are things like when you crank the Triton all the way up to change bits, it locks the shaft so it won't start. It has other safety locks as well, for me that means if I haven't used it for awhile and forget something, I can't hurt myself. I bought a table and top, but if I were doing it again, I'd build my own table.

Stick some time ago suggested adding a tube (snorkle) and attaching it to the bottom of the router so only clean air goes up through the router, reducing accumulation of sawdust in the works. My two cents. Having a good router table changes the way you work and expands your possibilities while also reducing your risk of injury. Your fence will be a very important part of your table. I like a high fence so I can hold up vertical pieces for end routing.

For some serious help on how to get the most from a router table, I don't think you can beat going to youtube and looking up the videos by Marc Sommerfeld. He promotes his products with a light hand, but was a cabinet maker earlier on and is technique is elegantly simple and straightforward. He is using a Triton in his table so you can see how he works it at the same time.

BTW, I don't get a toaster for recommending the Triton or his videos. They are just the clearest on how to do a wide variety of cabinets with the router. I like them so much I bought the set and watch the most appropriate one when I'm about to take on something I haven't done or haven't done an awhile.

I also like the way he uses squared up pieces of MDF to guide his workpieces through the router. Simple, elegant technique.

My 35 cents worth.
Tom, thanks for the recommendations and I'll have to check out that youtube channel.
That Triton is one of the routers I've been eyeballing for this new table. Nice price and while I'm not certain the extra power is necessarily for my builds, I'd probably enjoy having it.

It does seem odd to me that Bosch, Makita and DeWalt don't have 3.25hp fixed base models, or more specifically 3.25hp models that will fit into a router lift since they're now pretty common. I mean if Milwaukee is selling a $370 router you'd think the others would only be happy to do the same. Perhaps the demand for larger table based routers may be smaller than what I suspect.
 

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To me, it sounds like a lot of work for something that could be built a lot easier and probably better. First off a cast iron table for a 3 lb router is not necessary. Does the table have removable rings or plate for different size bits? If not then it's a no starter. Does it have a miter slot? If not again a no starter. The fence on your saw can't or at least shouldn't be used since you can't mount a feather board to it. Even with the saw itself, the table is still pretty small for adequate support for longboards. Bottom line for me would be to ditch the table and build a new one even if it's simply part of the extension table.
 

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That's a pretty slick bracket. Do you have a name for it, or a link? Thanks
w/ fold down brackets you could drop the RT out of the way w/o changing any settings if you need to use the TS in the middle of your routering operation...
you'll find that w/ a TS/RT combo, one operation will get in the way of the other... don't ask how I know this...
after a while you'll go w/ separate tools...

To me, it sounds like a lot of work for something that could be built a lot easier and probably better. First off a cast iron table for a 3 lb router is not necessary. Does the table have removable rings or plate for different size bits? If not then it's a no starter. Does it have a miter slot? If not again a no starter. The fence on your saw can't or at least shouldn't be used since you can't mount a feather board to it. Even with the saw itself, the table is still pretty small for adequate support for longboards. Bottom line for me would be to ditch the table and build a new one even if it's simply part of the extension table.
w/ a built top it would be easier to use a router plate or go w/ a lift...
there's the TS's miter slot to consider too...

use extended length brackets...
make a torsion box..
plate that w/ a piece of phenolic coated BB and the sky is the limit w/ room for change and adaptations...

consider advancing this project up a few notches w/ the future in mind...
JessEm Tool Company - Router Lifts, Tables and Accessories
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The cast iron top has miter slots, slots for a fence (that I'll build) and a 11.75 x 9.25 opening for a plate (I'm using a lift). It's the smaller Saw Stop router table extension.

I think what I'll do is build a folding out feed table around 30" deep using brackets like Stick posted. The router table will be separate but built to the same height to be used when needed as an extension to the table saw.

The router table top is 27x16 which, now that I'm building, is less surface than I'd like. I'll see if I can use some 3/4 MDF to add some more surface area around the front and sides.
 

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I'd skip the MDF and use Baltic Birch..
 
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