Router Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently scavanged some particleboard with a Formica facing on both sides and figured that it would make a dandy extension table on my Ridgid 3650. I managed to get the thing mounted and noticed that it was riding about 1/64" high in the middle where it buts against the TS. Hmmm, I check it with a straight edge and sure enough, it's bowed. I made a tensioning block and easily drew it down but then found the rest of the top bows downward at the middle, where the router lift will be. Now, the question. Do you think that when I build the dust collection box around the lift opening (lessing some of the resistance to correction) it will flatten out the table? My brain is stuck in indecision. I know the 'maybe', 'try it' and 'don't waste your time - make a new one' answers. I just need a kick in a direction. Geez, I'm tempted to not even post this, it's embarassing. Thanks in advance for your (anticipated) patience,
Chiz


edited for clarity
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
You are right Chiz start over with some new stock... :)
You want this right from the getgo, you may not always use the fence with the dust collection box on it.
Two glued as one will work better than just one...note: glue will not hold to well on Formica face side,use high end plywood or MDF, then formica the top side.

Bj :)

Bj :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,437 Posts
Chiz, no need to feel embarassed about asking, remember the only "dumb" question is the one not asked.
It's always difficult to work with warped, twisted and bowed pieces, unless they are intentional. Usually best to start fresh with a new one.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Chiz, everyone here had to ask the same questions at one time or another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
bobj3 said:
You are right Chiz start over with some new stock... :)
You want this right from the getgo, you may not always use the fence with the dust collection box on it.
Two glued as one will work better than just one...note: glue will not hold to well on Formica face side,use high end plywood or MDF, then formica the top side.

Bj :)

Bj :)

Thanks to all for not getting on the 'what are you, thick?' bandwagon. One more Q: I have some 3/4" BB ply which I hope has not taken on a bow while standing on edge and leaning a bit so I tough that I'd sandwich two of these together. The only issue is mounting to the front and back rails of the saw. I'm using aluminum angle (3/4" x 1") to connect the table to the rails. I will have to relieve the second (underside) piece enough to mount the angle and allow for the bolts to connect. That shouldn't significantly weaken it, should it? Secondly, where do you folks suggest that I buy such a small piece of formica? I've given up on the pre-faced particleboard as it is all in the same condition.
TIA (again),
Chiz
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Chiz, Formica will cut nicely on your table saw provided you use a fine tooth carbide blade designed for finish work or cutting laminates. An 80 tooth blade is adequate for a 10" saw; I am partial to Freud's red saw blades. I have had excellent results with them. I say red saw blades since there are two different names for the blades depending on where you buy them: Diablo or Industrial.
The secret for success with your table saw extension is not with the thickness of the wood but in the bracing you support it with. One layer of 3/4" plywood topped with 1/2" of Masonite or hardboard is a good choice. You can use two layers of 1/4" hardboard to get your 1/2" thickness. Cut your plywood first. Next cut your hardboard slightly oversize, allowing a 1/4" overhang all around. Glue the layers together using Weldwood contact cement. Use a pattern following bit to trim the hardboard exactly to the size of the plywood. (Super easy to do) The next step is to glue a hardwood strip to the ends using Titebond 3 glue. The strip should measure 3/4" thick x 1-1/4" high. Once your glue is dry do the same to the sides (overlapping the ends.) The next step is to cut Formica to slightly overlap the top on all sides and glue it on with contact cement. Trim flush with your pattern following bit or for a nicer look use a chamfering bit just slightly exposed to trim an 1/8" edge all around. Make some sort of mark to indicate your top surface. Now cover the bottom with Formica the same way and trim. Apply a finish such as wipe on polyurethane to the hardwood edging. Install your plate mounted router, then pop it out and seal the cutout surfaces with the wipe on polyurethane. The last step is to cut a piece of 1 x 2 hardwood to act as a stiffener. Predrill two mounting holes and slightly elongate them. You may want to cut the ends of the stiffener to 45 Degrees. Seal it with the wipe on poly and attach with screws as close as possible to the center of the table. The last step before mounting to the table is to install a miter slot if you want one. Use your router with an edge guide to cut the slot. Any further questions just ask.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I lke your idea of crossbracing, Mike, since it saves weight especially on an extension table added beyond the existing one. Do you get your laminaes form a cabinet shop or what? One of my other issues is gaining access to the mounting bolts since they will have to tightened from the underside.
Thanks,
Chiz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Chiz
You can find great deals on laminaes/formica at a used lumber outlets or part outs building supplys, I use a guy called ( the lumber guy) he buys over stock items and then resells them, you can also find some at HomeDepot and other outlets.
(check your Yellow Pages) just a note it's not cheap unless you are willing to take a 2nd. or chiped one or off color.

Bj :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Chiz, I find enough Formica at my local HD's. When the sheet has chips on the edges and corners they will reduce the price. If you find a selection on clearance this can mean even bigger savings. I bought 4 sheets for less than the price of one this way. The routers really don't care what color the formica is. (And the "mauve nebula" is just sensational... I may have to redecorate my shop to match!)((Kidding about this))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Good suggestion, Bob. Unfortunately, here in cow town we only have one such store and it's hardly any bigger than my 14 x24 shop. Nice folks, just not much to show for the effort. And Mike, I just don't have a square inch of room for a whole sheet of laminate. I had a good relationship with a cabinet shop but the guy closed his doors and cut the phone lines to his house too (you know what I mean). Tells ya something. BTW, our HD is stocking the 'mauve nebula" as well - yeowsers!! If things are calmer with Mom and Dad this weekend I might get something done. OTOH, the wife gets home from a week at church girl's camp tomorrow, sooooo... (after 33 years - anniv tomorrow - she's still got it in my book!!).
Later,
Chiz
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
I bought my mauve nebula on clearance and the truth is I think it will look good with brazilian cherry or purpleheart. I am building one of each. I learned a long time ago that one look is all it takes and they are sold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
Once being "nice" I bought a damaged laminate countertop at HD knowing I could get what I needed from the good end. About a week later I asked about getting a damaged one at a discount for a router table. Was told they dont discount because they can get a full refund from there distributer.

Rusty
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Rusty, you will find this varies by store and product. On a countertop I can see a replacement credit. The sheets of Formica I doubt it, there is too much breakage, same as with tile.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top