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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all! I have tongue and Groove project that requires a Router table set up. It will end up being my largest woodworking project ever. One of the fun reasons we bought this cottage to retire in was because we discovered some original tongue and groove ceiling planks behind a drop ceiling while looking at this place. Ended up only having 3 rooms with the tongue and groove, so my wife wants it everywhere else in the house! She's going back to work after retiring to fund this and other stuff, so I'm doing my part this way!

So, I've got 1000 sq feet of ceiling to create! I made the massive mistake of buying a cheap Rigid table saw for my last project, and while reading about the Bosch RA1181, more then one review mentioned issues with warping of the table and fence. So, that was one of the issues I had with the RIGID table saw, and don't wish to repeat it.

Problem is, I'm on a tight budget. So trying to get into a table that is good THAT also does not break the bank. Cheapest best set up! IF that is a thing!

Features I like
1 dedicated dust collector
2 being able to change and adjust bits from above table
3 dual plug for on off of vacuum and router
4 easy way to attach feature boards on rail and table

I was considering the Rockler Phenolic Router Table Top, SL Lift, Pro Fence and Stand at $699 plus a Dewalt DW618M Heavy-Duty 2-1/4 HP at $199 for a grand total of $898?

The ceiling and wall planks I'll be copying...!

397816
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum
Have you check your area to see if you can buy some reclaimed matching lumber someone in your area may have removed it from a home near you , you also may be able to buy it new or have a lumber mill in the area make it for you
What you are trying to do is some what a large job, and can be done but 1000 feet that is a lot of work
There are a lot members here willing to help you Good luck on this project
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I can get something similar in shape, but it is about an inch to narrow and it won't take the stain. So that is out! Had my eye out for reclaimed too, but no luck. My time is up, I want to be done with the main room by golf season, April 17th my club opens! I plan to do it over 3-4 years, a room or 2 a year during the cold winters up here.

Thanks!

Hello and welcome to the router forum
Have you check your area to see if you can buy some reclaimed matching lumber someone in your area may have removed it from a home near you , you also may be able to buy it new or have a lumber mill in the area make it for you
What you are trying to do is some what a large job, and can be done but 1000 feet that is a lot of work
There are a lot members here willing to help you Good luck on this project
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum.
 

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You'll never match the patina of the wood but you can match the look of it. But I would contact a local mill and with a picture and some measurements they could recreate it for you. But if you want to tackle it yourself then start with building a long table, at least 4 feet long. The vacuum and on-off switch are very simple. All you need to do is add a switched outlet inside the router stand and plug both the router and the vacuum into it. When you turn on the switch both will go on. Here is a link to the one I built. It's not fancy or pretty but does everything that you are asking a table to do. I was able to get the top from an office furniture store as a used modular desktop. Ask around they often throw them out when they re-do large office spaces.
 

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Welcome to the forum Kevin. Building a router table as stated gives you a big break in cost. Simple to do for your needs. I question the want to do this now and redo in 2-3 years. Wouldn't it be far cheaper to do it right the 1st time and take longer to do. I suspect if you try to base this on your golf club opening you'll be rushed, make mistakes, and cost far more to get what you really want. If it were me I'd take my time, get the proper equipment and do a bit at a time. If golf is that important then pause when the time comes. Just my 2 cents worth of advice.

Good luck either way.....and do check with your local mills as it might end up being the best and most cost effective way.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am not going to “redo” anything. I plan to do it correctly the first time. I’m going to take a few years to complete the project. So, to be clear, I’m going to put together my equipment and start making the tongue and groove and putting it up until golf season. Once golf season comes, wherever I’m at on the project, I’ll let it rest until next winter. I’m figuring the entire thing will take me a few years to complete correctly.

Welcome to the forum Kevin. Building a router table as stated gives you a big break in cost. Simple to do for your needs. I question the want to do this now and redo in 2-3 years. Wouldn't it be far cheaper to do it right the 1st time and take longer to do. I suspect if you try to base this on your golf club opening you'll be rushed, make mistakes, and cost far more to get what you really want. If it were me I'd take my time, get the proper equipment and do a bit at a time. If golf is that important then pause when the time comes. Just my 2 cents worth of advice.

Good luck either way.....and do check with your local mills as it might end up being the best and most cost effective way.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the video.

As for the patina, I'm pretty dog gone close. I spent months trying and failing, but finally came up with a pretty good formula of stain, wood, and original Shellac. I'll be honest, I accidentally got it right in the end when I tried a stain that I had laying around. Once I got the Shellac on it, it magically turned the right color and shine. It is actually in the photo above.

You'll never match the patina of the wood but you can match the look of it. But I would contact a local mill and with a picture and some measurements they could recreate it for you. But if you want to tackle it yourself then start with building a long table, at least 4 feet long. The vacuum and on-off switch are very simple. All you need to do is add a switched outlet inside the router stand and plug both the router and the vacuum into it. When you turn on the switch both will go on. Here is a link to the one I built. It's not fancy or pretty but does everything that you are asking a table to do. I was able to get the top from an office furniture store as a used modular desktop. Ask around they often throw them out when they re-do large office spaces.
 

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Okay, this is admittedly a provocative suggestion on the Router Forum, but here goes: Your throughput will be higher with either a shaper or radial arm saw fitted with a Moulding cutter. Both can be had for a decent price on Craigslist, and are more in line with the quantities you are cutting. It is important to realize that your profile was originally cut on a shaper or moulder, not a router table, with a custom knife set. It is very unlikely that you will find a router bit to match your profile, yet you can order up a set of custom shaper knives and you’ll be good to go. Clever knife designs include additional edges to help cut other profiles/profile combinations.

To be honest, all those bits and bobs you listed as needed to get a satisfactory router table are all standard fair in a shaper, plus a shaper goes in reverse. The one downside to a shaper is that New cutters are quite a bit more expensive than plain vanilla router bits, however shaper cutters can be combined on the spindle to arrive at far more varied profiles than router bits. On the plus side, the shapers typically have independently adjustable fences that enable you to use it as an improvised jointer. Shapers are what router tables are trying to imitate and are generally more powerful, more flexible, more sophisticated with built-in lifting plus above-table bit changes, generally have built in dust collection hook ups, and are quieter than a router.

That said, you might be ultimately better served in this T&G task by “taking your tool to the work” with a router + track system. Festool is the first name that comes to mind, BUT Triton’s track guide (and therefore router) is compatible with Triton, Makita, and Festool tracks. This approach would leave you with a handheld router and track system after the project is done, and importantly it provides a much more direct and simpler approach to your project that will probably yield better results than you’d get after wrestling your stock over a router table.

There is a generic brand track that is believed to be identical to the festool and Makita tracks. The Triton or Makita path is considerably cheaper than the Festool. I own Makita tracks, a Bosch router, and a customized Triton guide. Total cost with nothing to build was under $700.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the very helpful input. I'm going to give that some hard consideration and research too. Don't be surprised if I have questions to ask you!

Okay, this is admittedly a provocative suggestion on the Router Forum, but here goes: Your throughput will be higher with either a shaper or radial arm saw fitted with a Moulding cutter. Both can be had for a decent price on Craigslist, and are more in line with the quantities you are cutting. It is important to realize that your profile was originally cut on a shaper or moulder, not a router table, with a custom knife set. It is very unlikely that you will find a router bit to match your profile, yet you can order up a set of custom shaper knives and you’ll be good to go. Clever knife designs include additional edges to help cut other profiles/profile combinations.

To be honest, all those bits and bobs you listed as needed to get a satisfactory router table are all standard fair in a shaper, plus a shaper goes in reverse. The one downside to a shaper is that New cutters are quite a bit more expensive than plain vanilla router bits, however shaper cutters can be combined on the spindle to arrive at far more varied profiles than router bits. On the plus side, the shapers typically have independently adjustable fences that enable you to use it as an improvised jointer. Shapers are what router tables are trying to imitate and are generally more powerful, more flexible, more sophisticated with built-in lifting plus above-table bit changes, generally have built in dust collection hook ups, and are quieter than a router.

That said, you might be ultimately better served in this T&G task by “taking your tool to the work” with a router + track system. Festool is the first name that comes to mind, BUT Triton’s track guide (and therefore router) is compatible with Triton, Makita, and Festool tracks. This approach would leave you with a handheld router and track system after the project is done, and importantly it provides a much more direct and simpler approach to your project that will probably yield better results than you’d get after wrestling your stock over a router table.

There is a generic brand track that is believed to be identical to the festool and Makita tracks. The Triton or Makita path is considerably cheaper than the Festool. I own Makita tracks, a Bosch router, and a customized Triton guide. Total cost with nothing to build was under $700.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
They have loads of radial arm saws on facebook, but no shapers or track router systems.

Okay, this is admittedly a provocative suggestion on the Router Forum, but here goes: Your throughput will be higher with either a shaper or radial arm saw fitted with a Moulding cutter. Both can be had for a decent price on Craigslist, and are more in line with the quantities you are cutting. It is important to realize that your profile was originally cut on a shaper or moulder, not a router table, with a custom knife set. It is very unlikely that you will find a router bit to match your profile, yet you can order up a set of custom shaper knives and you’ll be good to go. Clever knife designs include additional edges to help cut other profiles/profile combinations.

To be honest, all those bits and bobs you listed as needed to get a satisfactory router table are all standard fair in a shaper, plus a shaper goes in reverse. The one downside to a shaper is that New cutters are quite a bit more expensive than plain vanilla router bits, however shaper cutters can be combined on the spindle to arrive at far more varied profiles than router bits. On the plus side, the shapers typically have independently adjustable fences that enable you to use it as an improvised jointer. Shapers are what router tables are trying to imitate and are generally more powerful, more flexible, more sophisticated with built-in lifting plus above-table bit changes, generally have built in dust collection hook ups, and are quieter than a router.

That said, you might be ultimately better served in this T&G task by “taking your tool to the work” with a router + track system. Festool is the first name that comes to mind, BUT Triton’s track guide (and therefore router) is compatible with Triton, Makita, and Festool tracks. This approach would leave you with a handheld router and track system after the project is done, and importantly it provides a much more direct and simpler approach to your project that will probably yield better results than you’d get after wrestling your stock over a router table.

There is a generic brand track that is believed to be identical to the festool and Makita tracks. The Triton or Makita path is considerably cheaper than the Festool. I own Makita tracks, a Bosch router, and a customized Triton guide. Total cost with nothing to build was under $700.
 
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