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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone came up with a perfect size (surface area) for router table?
I am building one to be incorporated with one of my Shopsmith ER-10's.
Is there such a thing as too large of a table or too small?
I have an old Craftsman aluminum table, it is functionable, but seems small and the noise level is terrible. Vibration and metal are not a good mix..
What are your opinions? :)

Bob
 

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Hi Bob

The perfect size , but this is just my 2 cents :)

36" high 36" wide and 48" long with 2ea. router base plates (11" x 11" drop in type) that can be used from 3 sides of the cabinet with storage under the top on both sides of the cabinet with one big drawer on the bottom that can be pulled out from the front side or the backside of the cabinet ( to hold the routers bits or parts and some jigs for the router)
Fence would be in two parts,one for the front side and one that can be used from the backside if needed,swing type fence on both with inserts in the center.
Power outlets and power switch on both ends of the cabinet with locking wheels on the base of the cabinet.

You may ask why two base plates, the 2nd one is a good place to drop in a 2nd router,pocket hole jig,jig saw,etc. the pocket hole jig works great on the router table because you have a flat top and it 48" long to hold the stock true and if you drop the pocket hole jig down just a bit in the drop in base you will have a nice flat spot all the way.

Bj :)
 

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Hi Bud

LOL :) but then your router table will now become your work bench with some drop in plates to plug the holes when you need to. :)
And you can put the routers in the big drawer on the bottom with the base plates still in place on the routers :) drop in and use.



Bj :)
 

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Bob, There is not one answer that works for everybody. Some people build their tables so they can sit at them while a professional cabinet shop might use their table exclusively for running long moldings, there are too many variables. Perhaps the best thing is to describe a couple popular tables so you can judge for yourself.
The Router Workshop table top is 16" deep x 30" long. The mounting plate is 11"s square and set into the top about 4" from the left side. The fence is clamped on from front to back and you push your material away from you while routing. This leaves plenty of room to stack additional parts to the right of the fence for processing.
The ShopNotes #1 table is slightly larger at 22" deep x 33" long. This table most often see's a 9 x 12" mounting plate set lengthwise and centered on the top. The fence fastens from side to side with built in clamps and your work is moved from right to left.
The table surface should be between 9-14" below your elbow in a standing working position, and 1-5" below your elbow for a seated position.
There are many opinions on what material to build a top from. The Router Workshop table top is made from 3/4" baltic birch (bb) plywood with laminate top and bottom. The ShopNotes design uses 3/4" plywood and a 1/2" layer of tempered hardboard(Masonite) covered with laminate top and bottom. I like the laminate for a couple of reasons: it is a nice slick surface for your wood to slide on and you can easily make pencil marks for reference points and clean them off in a snap. I hope this information guides you towards building a table top you are happy with.
 

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Hey Corey

Let me know if you make one , as you know I have 4 router tables and they are now taking more room than I want to give them so I now need to come up with a new way to use the routers I have with a smaller foot print in the shop to get the room back.

Looks like my sons are going to get a router table some time this year :)

Bj :)
 

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bobj3 said:
Hey Corey

Let me know if you make one , as you know I have 4 router tables and they are now taking more room than I want to give them so I now need to come up with a new way to use the routers I have with a smaller foot print in the shop to get the room back.

Looks like my sons are going to get a router table some time this year :)

Bj :)
Bobj,

Easy solution!

Just make another router table capable of holding FOUR routers!
Look at all the room you could save!

And you could sell the old four for more than it would cost to make the Last One! :) :)

A win win project! :) :)

The other Bob...
If you have watched The Router Workshop, you will see that Bob & Rick get along pretty well with the table they use. From small projects to larger projects, it all seems to get easily done.
ergo, I would use it as a pattern using the measurements that Mike mentioned.

If it aint broke, why fix / change it?

IMHO...
 

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I don't believe that there is a true answer to this other than, for each person, there is and will always be a difference for what they need. Some may need a larger table, others a simple small table. To each his/her own.
 

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challagan said:
In other words... the dining room table :D That would be a nice one Bj, but then I would have to get rid of my work bench :)

Corey
Not so Corey. Your work bench now becomes your dining room table. :D With a vice to hold your napkins in. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks guys.. I know this subject has probably been beat to death before I got here.
I think size is dominated by work space and the task being done

Router tables are just like cars and other things. If all our taste were the same it would create one heck of a fight..

I am leaning toward 18" x 24" work surface with a Rousseau base plate and T-lock tracks where needed.

BTW I think Elcaminos rule...

Bob
 

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drsmtl said:
Thanks guys.. I know this subject has probably been beat to death before I got here.
I think size is dominated by work space and the task being done

Router tables are just like cars and other things. If all our taste were the same it would create one heck of a fight..

I am leaning toward 18" x 24" work surface with a Rousseau base plate and T-lock tracks where needed.

BTW I think Elcaminos rule...

Bob
You might take a look at this...
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=28007

... it's cool... knock down...
 

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Bob, When you are ready to install your mounting plate I suggest you puirchase the template installation kit. It includes a 2 piece guide bushing that makes installation super easy. There are also mounting kits for each brand of router so you are perfectly centered on the mounting plate. A few extra dollars well worth spending. You can view other posts on this subject in the forums.
 

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Joe and Corey

I think the new router table will look like the one below ▼

It's funny when you get into routers and router tables you find out that you want more and more and then you have too many for the shop size. :)

This one will have round base plates because it's easy to make a round drop in pockets for the base plate and I like to use 3/8"/1/2" thick stock for the router base plates .
Make a trip to the hardware store and pick up some plastic stock and fire up the band saw and the drill press and I have a new base plate quick and easy. :) or I can buy them ,see below.

The only thing I can't do it mount the Horz.router parts to this type of top but all the other add on items should work fine like the OakPark jigs,Pin Router parts.drop in plates for the pocket hole jig,Jig saw,etc.

Still working on the base cabinet, have not got that down yet . :)

Round Veritas® Base Plate/Table Insert
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=41776&cat=1,43000,51208&ap=1

Bj :)
 

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bobj3 said:
Joe and Corey

I think the new router table will look like the one below ▼

It's funny when you get into routers and router tables you find out that you want more and more and then you have too many for the shop size. :)
This one will have round base plates because it's easy to make a round drop in pockets for the base plate and I like to use 3/8"/1/2" thick stock for the router base plates .
Make a trip to the hardware store and pick up some plastic stock and fire up the band saw and the drill press and I have a new base plate quick and easy. :)

The only thing I can't do it mount the Horz.router parts to this type of top but all the other add on items should work fine like the OakPark jigs,Pin Router parts.drop in plates for the pocket hole jig,Jig saw,etc.

Still working on the base cabinet, have not got that down yet . :)

Bj :)
Hi Bob!

I guess you liked my idea! :) :)

Just a few comments on your top design:
Apparently each router is purposely 'out of line' with the others.
It appears that one router setup could interfere with an adjacent router.
Longer boards may require other fences to be removed; if kept in-line, one fence line could go into the next fence's line.

If you had T Track at the ends also, the End routers could be used from the ends as well as the sides providing more flexiblity.

Will that vacuum hose interfere with routing operations? Is it aimed at the chips going under the top? On the top?

I've never seen round plates in a router table... If the routers are to be popped out for bit changes, etc. (like Bob & Rick do), wouldn't they have a tendancy to roll around a little? Square plates would provide more stability.

Looks like a COOL idea and layout... :) :) :)

Now, how much room is made as a result of making this consolidation?

When are your other tables going to go On Sale? :) :)

Looking good!
 

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Hi Joe

Your ideal got the light bulb flashing in my head :)
( out house for 4 people at a time but not using the same hole at the same time :) ) LOL hahahahaha

Only one router will be use at a time and because the fence can just swing out of the way it should be ok I Think ? :).

Vacuum hose , about the same thing just pop it in or out when it's needed into the back of the fence exit ports.
Round base plates will have 1/4" knotch so they can be line up with the 1/4" dowell pin that's in the router top.
And the round blank ones just pop out if it's needed.
Square plates are a pain to put in but round holes anyone can do it quick and easy with a home made cir.jig.
I use the brass guide in a 3/4" hole on the cir.jig just drop the plunge router in the 3/4" hole and cut the hole or the recess for the base plate quick and easy.
With a pass or two it's done,,, no sticks or template needed,,, all that's needed is 1/8" hole for a center mark :)
Not to crazy about Tee tracks but I use them for holding devices to keep the stock to the fence .
Not sure if I'm going to sale the other ones yet they may end up in the boys shop but who knows for sure need to made sure I like the setup 1st.

"consolidation" this should give me back about 26 sq. ft. or just abit more if I work it right.

Bj :)


________________________
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Joe Lyddon said:
Hi Bob!

I guess you liked my idea! :) :)

Just a few comments on your top design:
Apparently each router is purposely 'out of line' with the others.
It appears that one router setup could interfere with an adjacent router.
Longer boards may require other fences to be removed; if kept in-line, one fence line could go into the next fence's line.


If you had T Track at the ends also, the End routers could be used from the ends as well as the sides providing more flexiblity.

Will that vacuum hose interfere with routing operations? Is it aimed at the chips going under the top? On the top?

I've never seen round plates in a router table... If the routers are to be popped out for bit changes, etc. (like Bob & Rick do), wouldn't they have a tendancy to roll around a little? Square plates would provide more stability.

Looks like a COOL idea and layout... :) :) :)

Now, how much room is made as a result of making this consolidation?

When are your other tables going to go On Sale? :) :)

Looking good!
 

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Looking good there Bob. That would be pretty sweet set up for sure bob. I don't have room for a set up like that though.


I have been thinking.... I know.. I know. I think the best way for me to gain additional routing space is to use the right extension of my table saw. I can get all the space I want, it's at the right space for me and I can do alot of operations on it that I don't have the room for on my Bench Dog. We will see.

Corey
 

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Corey, how about just simply use Bob's shop? ;) :D
 

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Mike said:
Bob, There is not one answer that works for everybody. Some people build their tables so they can sit at them while a professional cabinet shop might use their table exclusively for running long moldings, there are too many variables. Perhaps the best thing is to describe a couple popular tables so you can judge for yourself.
The Router Workshop table top is 16" deep x 30" long. The mounting plate is 11"s square and set into the top about 4" from the left side. The fence is clamped on from front to back and you push your material away from you while routing. This leaves plenty of room to stack additional parts to the right of the fence for processing.
The ShopNotes #1 table is slightly larger at 22" deep x 33" long. This table most often see's a 9 x 12" mounting plate set lengthwise and centered on the top. The fence fastens from side to side with built in clamps and your work is moved from right to left.
The table surface should be between 9-14" below your elbow in a standing working position, and 1-5" below your elbow for a seated position.
There are many opinions on what material to build a top from. The Router Workshop table top is made from 3/4" baltic birch (bb) plywood with laminate top and bottom. The ShopNotes design uses 3/4" plywood and a 1/2" layer of tempered hardboard(Masonite) covered with laminate top and bottom. I like the laminate for a couple of reasons: it is a nice slick surface for your wood to slide on and you can easily make pencil marks for reference points and clean them off in a snap. I hope this information guides you towards building a table top you are happy with.


This posting is very helpful to me. I am still trying to build a router table using the Oak Park top, and because of the major project I used to justify the purchase of a router, bits, table parts, lumber, etc. to the household budgetmeister I need to build extensions so that I can deal with nearly 8 foot long stock. I am also confined to a wheelchair so I have to build a table at which I can sit. I have 3/4 inch baltic birch plywood but I would like to laminate it. Where can I find the kind of laminate used in the Oak Park table top? Am I correct that it is melamine?
 
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