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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Woodworking is my hobby. I have a pretty small basement shop, 12' x 13'. I'm sure that won't break any records but it's tiny. (My largest project was a twin bed futon.)

Anyway, I have a Rockler router table. I glued and screwed a 2 x 4 to the table and lock the 2 x 4 into the jaws of my Black and Decker Workmate. When not in use, I hang both off the wall of the shop. I'd like to explore other tables but I need to be able to store what ever I end up with on a wall and I'd prefer using my current base. The Oak-Park unit looks like it might work?

I'd appreciate any input you might have. Thanks for reading this and giving it some thought.
 

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Berry, a simple stand made with 2 x 4"'s could be hinged to fold flat for storage or easy transport. You don't mention why you want to change your table, what you are trying to accomplish? Since you have your Rockler table top installed in a Workmate I am guessing that height is your main concern. The Router Workshop table is a popular design. The table section will store under a bench. Plans for building this table and base cabinet are $4 from Oak Park. The top is not included in the plans but it is 3/4" thick x 18 x 30". Other sources for excellent plans are Woodsmith, Shopnotes, Wood Magazine, in fact most woodworking magazines offer their own design. Several members have posted clever designs of their own. Keep us up to date on your progress.
 

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Berry, you may already know this but the Rockler table and be ordered with a very strong set of folding legs. Fold it up and hang it on the wall. Or, I take the router plate out of mine and then drop in a nice auxiliary top that serves as a work area. I like the top but it appears you are looking for something different. Can you tell us why? I the amateur around here so can't offer any serious help other than that.
 

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router table

Birch said:
Berry, you may already know this but the Rockler table and be ordered with a very strong set of folding legs. Fold it up and hang it on the wall. Or, I take the router plate out of mine and then drop in a nice auxiliary top that serves as a work area. I like the top but it appears you are looking for something different. Can you tell us why? I the amateur around here so can't offer any serious help other than that.
i have the ROUTER WORK SHOP table with the dust shoot i built the base with doors i built the slides to hold the tools and the bushing's which i have the full set the table is off set to the left which work's for me i use it most every day for something i would'nt be with out it i also got the 2 fence's i use the fence and the flush trim bit all the time the fence with the grove in it is 1/8" off set or infeed is 1/8" so as to take off that much when you have it set up right their is no snip on the end it sure makes the wood true for glue ups that's my story del schisler
 

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I'm in a similar (small basement) situation and have been researching this topic as well. Currently I have this Freud table (and I agree with the amazon reviews about quality control problems). The table is fine and perfectly usable but there were loose screws and even one that was torn out. The fence is very nice. At some point I'd like to build a new table and have been searching the web for ideas. I'll include a few links below. Although none of these tables are exactly what I'm looking for I will use ideas from the various projects to come up with something that suits me.

It sounds like you want to continue to use your workmate as a base but as mentioned, several manufacturers make foldaway tables such as Rockler and Rousseau.

Fold-away router table
Mobile router center
Rex Mill router table (in the projects section)

There are some plans here available for purchase
http://www.plansnow.com/routertable.html

Enjoy,
Michael
 

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Berry

I have a big shop 24' x 26' and I have the same error, always running out of room for tools...and a place to work on a projects.
One of the ways I came up to get more room is to use a old door 1 1/2" x 35" x 7' ,I have a work bench that runs along one of the walls made of 2' x 4 ' x 8' I used the hinges (3ea.hvy.duty) that came with the door and screwed them to the 2 x 4 work bench.
I got the door from a guy called The Used Lumber Guy,it was 25.oo bucks, I think it was used for a fire door in a warehouse, it's 1.5" thick MDF.

Now I have a work bench when I need it, that's all the time that's clean and flat.
I did inlay a flat plate for the Kreg pocket hole jig in it, that works great to make up face fames.
What I'm saying is to inlay the router table in a door, then when you don't need it's out of the way but when you do its quick and easy to set up.
I try and make all my tools the same size 36" high, in that way I have a table to use for the table saw or what every I need.
i.e. cutting a 4' x 8' plywood stock,I pull up table to hold the plywood and then move the table saw next to it and rip away.

Hope this helps and it's just one of many ways to get more room in the shop.

Here's snapshot just for kicks.
http://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=2440
You will see a old iron board under it,that I use when I put a real load on the top but most of the time it's just one stick works the best for me,the hinges hold most of the load.
I'm 6'3" 260lbs. and I do get on it to change a light bulb from time to time and to get to the top of the cabinets and it holds my big butt I know I should get a ladder out to do this job but like most I'm always in a hurry,,,

Bj :)
 

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Bob, I like your table. Have you considered those foldable legs for it? They are very sturdy and for support, if memory serves correctly can support quite a bit of weight. Or would those interfere with folding the table out of the way?
 

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Hi Ken
Yes I did but I put in the Iron Board because it was free when my BOSS said she will never use it again ... hahahahahahaha.....free is for me....the 2 x 4 stick is so quick and easy to use, but it's down most the time.
I just made a new router table today and it worked great to put it all together I hate to get on the garage floor and play with my toys...hahahahaha ...

Have a good weekend
Bj :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are 3 things I don't like about the Rocker table.
1. The inserts are aluminum and fit well but the opening for the router bit is 3" and so they sell additional plastic inserts that screw (three itsybitse little buggers) into the main insert. They don't fit very well and stock often hangs up on these.
2. The bloody table is pretty heavy and it's a pain to hang up.
3. Both my routers are Craftsman, and I never could find a base that would accept the standard PC guide bushings...so I purchased a Oak-Park base with it's bushings. I like dealing with them so now I'm leaning that way.

I sure like BJ's idea about mounting it off the wall and doing away with the base. I used that idea with my sanding table. I swing it up, put on the leg, attached the dust collector and make dust. But if your still out there, why inlay the unit in a door Or why not mount it to the wall directly?

I was not aware of the folding leg option from Rocker and the others. I'll have to check that out too although the B&D Workmate makes for a solid plateform and I've already spent the $.

Thanks to each of you for taking time to share ideas. You make this one of the best forums out there. berry
 

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Berry
If you inlay the Oak-Park plate in you can remove it and put it under the work bench with the router on it and the top will be flat on the wall and you can just pop in a blank insert to use the other tools in the shop in the same port or just a nice clean spot to work on projects.
When it down it's clean and like most shops a work bench becomes a place to put all the stuff that should be put away but will all say I will do that some day.

Bj :)
 

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You also have to consider the accumulation factor when designing new benchs. I am afraid my poor garage(shop) is way over limit. I am working with a 24' x 22' area and it just isnt big enough. I am on a tool diet. I reallly didn't need that second full sized Craftsman tablesaw set up just to run dado's, so I managed to part with it. And I promise to sell my Shopsmith router table when I finish building the two I have in the works. Oh yeah, I will sell one of those too! I only need one router table. See what great progress I am making? What about my pin router? It doesn't count! It's different! Besides, all my router accesories are in the cabinet it is sitting on. The steel table? That is for my assembly work. My neighbor gave it to me and it's too good to let go to waste. Of course I know those boxes of project supplies sitting on it are in the way. It needs a shelf under it and I haven't had the room to build one yet. The big steel table in the corner? Yeah, it is a monster. Took 4 of us to get it off my truck. That is for working on oily or greasy stuff. Why are the two cases of finish nails on it? Well Rockler had them on clearance and I asked how much less if I take 'em all, and they are too heavy for my shelving. Of course I know I should have heavy duty shelving, but my buddy gave me all this and since it was free...
I hope this made you smile and laugh. I really did have a point I was trying to make and it's this: Careful planning makes all the difference in the world. BJ listed one great idea and that is to have all your benches the same height where possible so they are multi functional. If you mount more than one tool on a stand make sure you have easy access to the dust collection ports and adequate electrical wiring in place first. For a small shop consider using your router table as a stand for more than one tool. For example you might mount a 4" belt/disk sander on a plate that drops into your router table. You don't want to end up like the guy in my story, which is true. (Of course I need the arc welder and the industrial size gas bottles for my torch!)
 
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