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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of getting a table saw but am looking for a mutli tool and saw what a router can do. Wonder if I use it to cut a 2x4 like a table saw ? Otherwise can I cut the 2x4 with my circular saw and do a fine cut with my router ? Can I use a 1/2" straight bit on a 2HP router to do it ?
 

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IMO I have never heard of anyone trying to use a router to do the work of a circular or table saw. If you try let us know how it turns out. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - how about using it like a jigsaw. I know the dremel trio works like a jigsaw & router so can a regular router do the same ? New to woodworking and do some small scale wood cutting once in a while so I do not want to get too many tools that end up sitting around collecting dust.
 

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I was thinking of getting a table saw but am looking for a mutli tool and saw what a router can do. Wonder if I use it to cut a 2x4 like a table saw ? Otherwise can I cut the 2x4 with my circular saw and do a fine cut with my router ? Can I use a 1/2" straight bit on a 2HP router to do it ?
Hi - Welcome to the forum:)
Almost anything can be done, just whether or not they are good ideas. I'm continually being amazed at what can be done with a router but I don't think it's a viable substitute for a saw. Cutting 2x stock with a router would be tedious at best and down right dangerous at worst. Cutting a 2x4 with a router and 1/2" bit would require between 6 and twelve passes, depending on the shank size of the bit, with associated depth adjustments between each pass.
Much more viable would be doing the initial cutting with the circular saw and cleaning it up with a router though. Actually, with adequate preperation and setup the circular saw can give comparable results with a table saw. JMHO:)
 
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Hi doreme



The Jig saw and the router have a hard time cutting a true straight line without some type of guide, the power hand saw will do the job quick and easy and than you will be a happy camper..

If you don't have a router table forget about using the router to cut off 2 x 4. :(

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I was thinking of getting a table saw but am looking for a mutli tool and saw what a router can do. Wonder if I use it to cut a 2x4 like a table saw ? Otherwise can I cut the 2x4 with my circular saw and do a fine cut with my router ? Can I use a 1/2" straight bit on a 2HP router to do it ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone. So how do I make a curve cut on a 2x4 then ? My idea is to first cut off the edge with a circular saw then how do I make a curve cut ?
 

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Hi

You will need to make a quick and easy cir. jig for your router.

The jig it's needed to support your router, pull out some scrap 1/4" thick plywood stock, drill a hole for the router bit to siick out of the hole ,screw the plywood to the base of your router, drive a nail in the cir.jig then into the 2 x 4 for the radius you want to use.

Than power up the router and make the pass, it will take 3 or 4 cuts..the norm..be sure and clamp the 2 x 4 to your work bench....

You may say but I don't want just a cir.cut, than you will need to make a pattern(template) that the router bit can copy,you will need router bit with a bearing on it or use a brass guide so the bit can use it to follow the pattern..(template)
same as b/4 some scrap plywood stock for the pattern clamp/nail it to the 2 x 4...
Just a note,, the brass guide works the best for that type of job, because it let you plunge down into the 2 x 4..but still have a guide for the router bit.

http://www.harborfreight.com/9-piece-router-template-guide-set-98361.html

good luck


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Thanks everyone. So how do I make a curve cut on a 2x4 then ? My idea is to first cut off the edge with a circular saw then how do I make a curve cut ?
 

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Basics first

I don't want to sound too critical, Doreme, but it sounds like you need to get a book on basic woodworking so you can understand what the different tools are actually designed for, along with the associated safety practices for each.

To make a curved cut on a 2x4, for example, the ideal tool would be a bandsaw. But, a good jig saw can do that, too, just not as smoothly.

Routers, on the other hand, are intended to cut edge profiles, grooves (dados and rabbets), and that sort of thing, but in increments of generally no more than 1/4" at a time. For many things, more shallow cuts are recommended.

Using a power tool for a task other than what it was designed for can be very dangerous.
 

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Hi Ralph

" Routers, on the other hand, are intended to cut edge profiles, grooves (dados and rabbets)"
At one time that was true but now with the big tank routers has change that, with your big Porter Cable tank it will do that job easy,you can chuck up a 1/2" router bit and it will plow right down a 2 x 6 in one pass in the plunge mode if you want to..take look see at some of Harry projects and you will see him do just that.. :)


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I don't want to sound too critical, Doreme, but it sounds like you need to get a book on basic woodworking so you can understand what the different tools are actually designed for, along with the associated safety practices for each.

To make a curved cut on a 2x4, for example, the ideal tool would be a bandsaw. But, a good jig saw can do that, too, just not as smoothly.

Routers, on the other hand, are intended to cut edge profiles, grooves (dados and rabbets), and that sort of thing, but in increments of generally no more than 1/4" at a time. For many things, more shallow cuts are recommended.

Using a power tool for a task other than what it was designed for can be very dangerous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi Ralph

" Routers, on the other hand, are intended to cut edge profiles, grooves (dados and rabbets)"
At one time that was true but now with the big tank routers has change that, with your big Porter Cable tank it will do that job easy,you can chuck up a 1/2" router bit and it will plow right down a 2 x 6 in one pass in the plunge mode if you want to..take look see at some of Harry projects and you will see him do just that.. :)


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Great - exactly what I was looking for. Do you have a link for Harry's project.
 

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Thanks - how about using it like a jigsaw. I know the dremel trio works like a jigsaw & router so can a regular router do the same ? New to woodworking and do some small scale wood cutting once in a while so I do not want to get too many tools that end up sitting around collecting dust.
How do you figure the Trio works like a jig saw? I'm asking because I've owned one for years. In my experience it works like a mini router or a large Dremel tool. Never seen any recip saw blades like used with a jig saw. Plus it does not have a recip action setting.
 

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How do you figure the Trio works like a jig saw? I'm asking because I've owned one for years. In my experience it works like a mini router or a large Dremel tool. Never seen any recip saw blades like used with a jig saw. Plus it does not have a recip action setting.
The last post to this 11 year old thread was 7 years ago and most of these folks are no longer here; don't expect a response from them. Better to start your own thread and ask this question.
 

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The last post to this 11 year old thread was 7 years ago and most of these folks are no longer here; don't expect a response from them. Better to start your own thread and ask this question.
I didn't even notice the date. I'm fairly new to this site.
And how that Trio hasn't been made for over 10 years I'll pass on asking it as a question. But I'm glad there are still a lot of the bits still available on the web.
 

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This is a very old thread, But for anyone with the same question don't try to use a router for cutting wood. IMHO the most important tool in a shop is the table saw. Period end of discussion. But if you only can get one tool then consider a radial arm saw. It does everything a table saw can but a little differently. I'm not sure if they even make them anymore but if not get a used one. Both a table saw and a radial arm saw can do dance edges and grooves. One of the last tools to get is a router. A router is a specialty tool and yes its main purpose is fancy edges and grooves. It can do other things but then again so can a screwdriver.
 

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Thanks for sharing :love:
I didn't even notice the date. I'm fairly new to this site.
And how that Trio hasn't been made for over 10 years I'll pass on asking it as a question. But I'm glad there are still a lot of the bits still available on the web.
@RiovistaAndy
Here is a link to an old thread of mine, where I made a large, multi-layered house sign, using a Dremel Trio to cut one of the layers

And here is a pic of the House sign (900 mm wide) and the forest layer being cut. It wasn't easy to control the cut, I eventually got better at it. I now use the Trio as a small router in a home made table, mainly for rounding over small hand cut letters, like the ones on the house sign.
 

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I didn't even notice the date. I'm fairly new to this site.
And how that Trio hasn't been made for over 10 years I'll pass on asking it as a question. But I'm glad there are still a lot of the bits still available on the web.
I’ve been here for years, and since this site got updated, myself and others have got caught up in it to .
Any time I see a thread now, I have to check and see how many years old it is :(
 
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