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Discussion Starter #1
I have the opportunity to pick up a Grizzly Shaper, 3/4 HP, Model G0510Z for $200.00. I need to make a bunch of mouldings and RP doors.

Would this shaper be better suited to the task than a table mounted router? I have a 15 amp Bosch mounted in my table that certainly works well but have never used a Shaper and don't know if it may be better for "bigger" work.

Thoughts and advice greatly appreciated
 

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I asked the same question a while back because my dad had a shaper but not a router table years ago. If you don't already own shaper cutters they are a lot more money to buy than router bits. Shapers don't run router bits very well because they spin too slow. Stick seemed to like the 5 HP shapers not 3/4 hp. So I passed on the small shaper and later found a used Bench Dog router table. I am still a novice so I can't help you any special bits.
 

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Anything you need to make a lot of is better done on a shaper. I'm also not sure about the 3/4 horsepower size though. I would want to try it with something like an RP bit mounted on the spindle to see how it handles it.
 

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I started with a Grizly shaper you are talking about. It has 2 speeds and i think the top speed was around 12,000, It came with an adapter for router bits, and no shaper bits. I used it as a router table for about a year and made a few moldings with it.
What I found was that since router bits are mostly 2 flute bits that it did not have the power or speed enough to do a good job. Shaper bits are 3 and 4 flute bits and cost quite some more than router bits.
It is a well built machine and heavy duty, but not made for router bits and I didn't want to invest in shaper bits for it. I ended up going to a router table. I bought one from Rockler that had the lift-out plate,and was a happy camper.
Herb
 

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I have an article somewhere that tells how to make shaper cutters. It was written by a pro, not an amateur, and it ain't an easy thing go do and do it right. A 3/4 shaper sounds more like hype, and more equivalent to a router than a shaper. All my needs/wants are taken care of with a router, so were it me I'd pass, and just buy a nice router. But your dime, do as you will.
 
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I started with a Grizly shaper you are talking about. It has 2 speeds and i think the top speed was around 12,000, It came with an adapter for router bits, and no shaper bits. I used it as a router table for about a year and made a few moldings with it.
What I found was that since router bits are mostly 2 flute bits that it did not have the power or speed enough to do a good job. Shaper bits are 3 and 4 flute bits and cost quite some more than router bits.
It is a well built machine and heavy duty, but not made for router bits and I didn't want to invest in shaper bits for it. I ended up going to a router table. I bought one from Rockler that had the lift-out plate,and was a happy camper.
Herb
I priced out shaper bits at WP and they were in the hundreds of dollars a piece . I almost bought a shaper from them , but then I priced out the bits . I'm not doing anything with a large enough volume to justify owning one
 

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I have a Delta Homecraft 1/2" spindle shaper (and I think a 1/2 HP motor) that I bought probably from the FIL of a co-worker (along with a Walker-Turner 6" jointer which is still going strong). I haven't used it in probably 20 years, the last time was to make several hundred feet of oak molding for the edges of a batch of tables for a restaurant remodel - we used to buy random width #2 Red Oak in lengths 10' - 14' by the truckload (and use it for edging mostly although you could make face frames and glue ups if you cut around the knots). It's not the most powerful machine out there, but it just hummed along for hours cutting the profile on the oak. I bought a carbide cutter for the profile - only because of the amount of use it was going to get - but I have a box of different HS cutters that was thrown in with the deal.

I guess that shapers get a bad rep for being dangerous but we had feather boards on the fence, inboard and outboard sides, and one on the table in advance of the cutter, and never had any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I guess what i am really wondering is if the 3/4 HP motor (10 amps i believe) in the shaper, is better suited to this work (more powerful) than my 15 amp router mounted in a table. I Know the bits cost more but at the end of the day, will it perform better or worse than my router.

Thanks
 

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The two motors are hard to compare. The router motor is a high speed, low torque motor and the shaper motor is a low speed, high torque motor. It is better suited to hard and continuous work that the router is. I'm just not sure if 3/4 horsepower is enough. 2 or 3 hp no question would be better. I took a 1hp motor and gutted a dead Freud router I had and put a pulley on it and I can turn the shaft at maybe 10 to 12000rpm and it works fairly well on small bits. It has enough torque that it doesn't slow down at all. I never tried it a large bit, just never needed to. That's why I say you should test it before buying.
 
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The two motors are hard to compare. The router motor is a high speed, low torque motor and the shaper motor is a low speed, high torque motor. It is better suited to hard and continuous work that the router is. I'm just not sure if 3/4 horsepower is enough. 2 or 3 hp no question would be better. I took a 1hp motor and gutted a dead Freud router I had and put a pulley on it and I can turn the shaft at maybe 10 to 12000rpm and it works fairly well on small bits. It has enough torque that it doesn't slow down at all. I never tried it a large bit, just never needed to. That's why I say you should test it before buying.
That is an interesting concept, Chuck.
 

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More to consider:

--Availability of 1/2'" spindle bore cutters in the desired profiles.

I looked in the 2016 printed Grizzly catalogue and this shaper has a 1/2" spindle. Next, I looked at the 1/2" bore shaper cutter profiles. Was not much of a selection compared to the 3/4" and larger bore cutters. Quality carbide shapers cutters are not exactly economical.

-- Does it come with rub collars? Might need to purchase additional rub collars of the appropriate diameter so that could be another expense. Same for cutter spacers.

-- This shaper has only 7/8" spindle travel which might not be enough for your intended use.

-- Hold downs and hold ins are required to safely operate a shaper.

-- How good is your dust collection? Sharpers are as bad as planers for creating chips and dust.
 
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