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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I just bought a router and am trying to learn how to use it... I'd like to cut a small oval (the size of a big egg, large diameter 3 inches, small diameter two inches or so... this is to make an egg cup, hence the need for an egg-shaped base) in a 20mm/0.8 inch pine board. How would I do this? It is too small to use a oval routing jig, and I am not sure that making a large template then moving the router withing the template will work... Has anyone any ideas?

many thanks
Thomas
 

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Do you mean an actual egg shape or just a flat board that has an egg shape but flat edges? If it is the flat edge then make a template out of MDF or plywood, mount a bushing in your router then use an up spiral bit to cut it out. You will need a plunge router for this.
 

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I have used the large template method. It works just fine as long as your base plate and bit are centered. If you have a problem with the base plate being off center, then you can remove the base plate and use the body of the router as the guide. I do not know of a router that does not have the bit centered in the base.
 

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Hello,
I just bought a router and am trying to learn how to use it... I'd like to cut a small oval (the size of a big egg, large diameter 3 inches, small diameter two inches or so... this is to make an egg cup, hence the need for an egg-shaped base) in a 20mm/0.8 inch pine board. How would I do this? It is too small to use a oval routing jig, and I am not sure that making a large template then moving the router withing the template will work... Has anyone any ideas?

many thanks
Thomas
I'm not clear as to what you're after because egg cups are usually turned in the lathe like this one however, if you simply want to rout an egg shape then make a template similar to the one shown. To determine the size of cut-out in the template the formula is: template guide diameter minus bit diameter plus the size of the wanted opening in the finished item.
Let us say that you will use a 3/4" guide and a 1/4" bit then: 3/4"-1/4"+3" =3.5"
3/4"-1/4"+2"=2.5"
This will give you a cut-out 3"x2", major and minor axis.
 

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What has the above post, as sweet as it is, got to do with the original question?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks! all done

Thanks everyone, I managed using a template and a bushing. By the way, how deep can I route at a time, using pine? In this case I cut the egg shape in 3mm increments, can I cut deeper? I tried once to cut the 20 mm board in one go, but managed to burn the bit... I was using a 10mm bit (not a spiral one) at around 25000 rpm.

many thanks

Thomas
 

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What a pity that you didn't include a sketch in your original post, had you done so a definitive answer would have been forth-coming. Your results are excellent. It really would be to your advantage to complete your public profile, so that we have a first name, what experience you have and what tools are at your disposal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What a pity that you didn't include a sketch in your original post, had you done so a definitive answer would have been forth-coming. Your results are excellent. It really would be to your advantage to complete your public profile, so that we have a first name, what experience you have and what tools are at your disposal.
Hi Harry,

You're right of course. Updated my profile and should have posted a sketch!
 

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That's so much better Thomas, now you're one of the "family" and we'll all know how to answer future questions in a more positive way.
 

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Hi Thomas;
I see we have the same Bosch router. How does it perform for you? I've found it good for undemanding tasks because of the play in the right pillar but I can't imagine doing dovetails with it.
Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi Thomas;
I see we have the same Bosch router. How does it perform for you? I've found it good for undemanding tasks because of the play in the right pillar but I can't imagine doing dovetails with it.
Regards
Hi there,
Frankly I don't know, never tried something as complex as dovetails... yet
 

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Hi Thomas;
No need to do dovetails. You can do a simple test: hold the router in the air with one hand and try to move the router base with the other hand left and right. If your router has a play in the right pillar you will hear typical sound, when the pillar will hit one side and then the other side of the right bushing.

Or put the router on the table, plunge it half way down and lock. Then apply a pressure to the right handle. If there is a play the bit will move and it won't be perpendicular to the table any more but tilted for some angle.

The Bosch customer support said to me, that this is totaly normal (?) and all POF1400ACE are built the same way. They also gave me an advice that, if I need to do more accurate work I should buy a professional router (one of the blue Bosch routers).

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I will have a look, but it sounds like the customer support needs some attitude check... can't believe they would say that!
Hi Thomas;
No need to do dovetails. You can do a simple test: hold the router in the air with one hand and try to move the router base with the other hand left and right. If your router has a play in the right pillar you will hear typical sound, when the pillar will hit one side and then the other side of the right bushing.

Or put the router on the table, plunge it half way down and lock. Then apply a pressure to the right handle. If there is a play the bit will move and it won't be perpendicular to the table any more but tilted for some angle.

The Bosch customer support said to me, that this is totaly normal (?) and all POF1400ACE are built the same way. They also gave me an advice that, if I need to do more accurate work I should buy a professional router (one of the blue Bosch routers).

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi everyone,

The cavity in the eggcup above was cut using a straight bit - and the result is that the vertical walls of the cavity are a bit rough. I tried to smooth them by gluing sand paper around a dowel, then rotating the dovel with a cordless drill to sand the cavity - what is the best to do this?
many thanks

Thomas
 

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Hi Thomas;
I see we have the same Bosch router. How does it perform for you? I've found it good for undemanding tasks because of the play in the right pillar but I can't imagine doing dovetails with it.
Regards
I've covered this very problem in a thread of mine just a few hours ago with a Bosch GOF-1300ACE router that I bought in 2000 and had to shim the router slightly forward under the table so that when pressure was applied I ended up with a vertical edge. At first I was very surprised because the pillars appeared to be of a large diameter, however, when the rubber boot was raised it revealed a skinny pillar. Needless to say, I didn't keep that router for long.
 

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That's what I'm talking about Harry. I'm very glad someone else noticed this.
The pillars are skinny indeed. The surface of the right pillar is not fine machined at all. As I can see it was not built to be in close tolerance with the bushing. That's why the hole in the right bushing is about 0.5 mm (could be more) bigger then diameter of the pillar. As a matter of fact; there is no right bushing - only a hole in the housing.
 
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