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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.. I would like to replicate the profile on the attached cross...

I am fairly new at the router table, and I have only routed profiles using the fence on the table.

The profile on the cross has an inside corner that would seemingly preclude the use of a fence.

What Bit do I use and How do i replicate the profile on the router table with or without a fence.

Thanks in advance
 

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welcome to the forums N/A...

that looks to be a bearing guided cove bit done free hand...
that's a guess...
a picture of the profile (end view) would be very helpful and put an end to the guess work......

as for this issue...

I am fairly new at the router table, and I have only routed profiles using the fence on the table...
head over to this link and fix that request....
 
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better...
straight on to the edge is more gooder...

 

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another profile style..

 

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You could do it on a table if you removed the fence.
 
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You could do it on a table if you removed the fence.
While I agree that you COULD do it that way, this is a small work piece and I would caution a "fairly new at this" person about that operation. You would have your hands pretty close to the bit in an operation that changes direction often.
I would suggest using the router freehand with a piloted bit as others have mentioned, with the workpiece secured to the bench or a larger piece of wood for stability and safety.
Just my $0.02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was also thinking that I could do on table w/o fence, but I have simply never done. ... and I do have concerns in regard to the small size of piece and proximity of my hands to bit and moving piece in right direction, etc. A video would help if anyone has a good link.

I wonder though... Did the creator of the project rout the edge of each piece separately before assembly using a stop block on the cross piece in order not to make a profile all the way across???

Is this a simple straight bit profile?

Anyone have thoughts on simply not worrying about stopping the edge profile at the intersection??
 

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Doug
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I was also thinking that I could do on table w/o fence, but I have simply never done. ... and I do have concerns in regard to the small size of piece and proximity of my hands to bit and moving piece in right direction, etc. A video would help if anyone has a good link.

I wonder though... Did the creator of the project rout the edge of each piece separately before assembly using a stop block on the cross piece in order not to make a profile all the way across???

Is this a simple straight bit profile?

Anyone have thoughts on simply not worrying about stopping the edge profile at the intersection??

To get the perfect intersection, the easiest way to do it is assemble the cross first, then route the inside edge using a bearing guided bit. The safest way to do it will be to use a starting pin, and then pivot the stock into the cutter and onto the bearing. Practice with much bigger pieces first to get a feel for how it works. When you feed into the bit you want the side of the bit where the cutter is coming toward you, not away.

Use push blocks like these ones https://www.homedepot.com/p/POWERTE...2b&gclid=CPayyPfCqOUCFWqYswodEfcMFw&gclsrc=ds to control your piece and keep your hands far away from the cutter. You could also screw on a piece of wood to the back and add a handle that way.



https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...DF68FCD1C8EAC31DACFCDF68FCD1C8EAC31&FORM=VIRE
 

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While I agree that you COULD do it that way, this is a small work piece and I would caution a "fairly new at this" person about that operation. You would have your hands pretty close to the bit in an operation that changes direction often.
I would suggest using the router freehand with a piloted bit as others have mentioned, with the workpiece secured to the bench or a larger piece of wood for stability and safety.
Just my $0.02.
Good point Chris. You’d be okay until you got close to the end and then your hand would be to close. You’d have to stop and change grips multiple times to avoid that.
 
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I'd definitely make the cross first, then route it. I always prefor working on a table with bearing guided bit, whatever profile I chose. I would use double sided tape to mount the cross on another piece of stock so I could move it around the bit withoud exposing my hands to the bit. You're working blind that way, but you know the shape.

You could also do this freehand. The couble sided tape will hold the cross down, But I think it would be hard to keep the router flat on that small amount of surface. I'd use a small router if I had one and go slow. Some bearing bits will allow you to change the size bearing so you could make a couple of passes and not try to hog it out all at once.

You could tape on some extra stock the thickness of cross, down around the Cross to give the router base some extra support if you do it freehand. If you're careful not to cut the surround, you can use that wood for something else. That should also make it a little safer.
 

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1... I was also thinking that I could do on table w/o fence, but I have simply never done. ...

2... and I do have concerns in regard to the small size of piece and proximity of my hands to bit and moving piece in right direction, etc. A video would help if anyone has a good link.

3... I wonder though... Did the creator of the project rout the edge of each piece separately before assembly using a stop block on the cross piece in order not to make a profile all the way across???

4... Is this a simple straight bit profile?

5... Anyone have thoughts on simply not worrying about stopping the edge profile at the intersection??
1... yes you can... easiest is free hand...
2... see the PDF's I linked to you..
3... not likely...
4... yes, it's a cove...
5... ???
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This is ALL GREAT information... Much appreciated...

Another Issue that I thought would be easy, but maybe not:

The Center Half Lap Joint where the pieces intersect.

I don’t have a table saw. I was thinking of using a straight bit with a fence and making multiple passes.

Is there a better way to do on router table?
 

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Addition: You could tape the cross to a piece of clear plastic and use the table with a bearing guided bit. You could at least see what you're doing.

As to cutting the half lap, consider making yourself an adjustable, exact width dado sled. You set the gap by sliding the Cross piece into the opening, You'd need to very carefull align the slot 90 to the side rails or your cross would be crooked--not acceptable.

When you build the jig, use an engineer's square to position the fixed cross piece at a precise 90. Technically not necessary, but you'll be happy you took the time and trouble later when you use one of the short pieces like a T square to align the jig. Build it nice and strong, you'll find uses for it for decades.

To assure alignment is 90, cut a piece to, say 8 inches long, cut it down the middle and with these pieces against a short side rail on the jug, push the cross up against the short pieces. It will assure your pieces are square to the jig--if the jig side pieces are square (90) to the slot.

Make a nice big jig. Clamp the jig in place, set the width, then tape the cross pieces down.

I always use a bottom bearing mortising bit for this kind of joint because it makes a very flat bottom cut. Here are pix of the sled (Lots of plans and video online), and a mortising bit.

Because you're using an exact width jig, the fit will be perfect, you just need to be certain your bit height is just right. You have to set bit depth of cut to allow for the additional thickness of the jig pieces, plus exactly half the thickness of the workpiece.
 

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Well if it was me I just use a handheld router and be done with it this is a pretty simple Job
Just clamp it down or set the work piece on rubber pad and getter done
 

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the fence as a stop only along w/ a miter gauge or sled..
feed your material perpendicular to the bit...
you really need to need those PDF's...

use this PDF just apply the dado blade TS arrangement to your router table..

.
 

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"in an operation that changes direction often"

I hate to disagree but the cross would be moved from right to left until all faces have been routed. Unless the cross is only a few inches in size, there would be plenty to hold on to keeping fingers well away from the bit.
 
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