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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for some advice: We have 2 worktops, one 40mm thick, the other 32mm. We want to create the effect in the pic below, I have the just bought a 25.4mm ovolo cutter for the top profile and a 19.1mm radius cutter for the bottom.

I intend to route the top worktop (32mm) with the ololo first and the the bottom worktop (40mm) with the radius, then laminate the two together.

I don't think it is wise to laminate the full worktop as I am concerned there maybe movement, I was thinking of just cutting strips for the bottom and fixing these to the top.

I was thinking of using titebond III for laminating the tops, we also have a Belfast sink being installed so water would be running over the join.

Any suggestions of a more suitable method of achieving this?
 

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My opinion, do the full lamination! The reason, there can get moisture inside and cause the top to have high spots , the table will become unstable if You spot laminate. Make sure that a thin strip of wood is attached to the outside with glue and, if You want a nice edge on the table, put it on that glued on strip!
 

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Hi Gareth

I've pondered this one. For starters I wouldn't use Titebond in a kitchen worktop joint - it might well be a weatherproof aliphatic (effectively a variation on the exterior grade PVA we see here) but it isn't completely waterproof. For that you need to go to either a UF (urea formaldehyde, plastic resin) glue such as Cascamite/Polymite or to an epoxy such as West System. Both will create joints which are absolutely watertight, which is surely what you need in a kitchen. An alternative might be PU (polyurethane) glue, such as Gorilla Glue, although great care is needed to avoid any foaming out from potentially damaging the surfaces around the joints.

On the subject of getting the dropped apron I am in favour of adding a "skirt". It would be better IMHO if a full height skirt could be added to the front face, but as that rerquires the use of a very tall cutter block on a spindle moulder it's maybe not a feasible option here. so, were I you I'd rout the lower skirt section and rip down into lengths which can be loose tenoned or biscuit jointed onto the underside of the worktop after it has been roughly positioned but not fixed. You'll need a fair few cramps to make a nice tight joint.

BTW have you thought about what strategy you are going to adopt for dealing with corners? Deep mouldings like these often need radiused edges (sharp corners can be dangerous) so you'll possibly need to make up a radius template for the corners, too

Regards

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #4
many thanks, I have also pondered this for a long time. The plan looks like:

Route the edge of the worktop with the Ovolo bit.

Cut strips (under skirt) and route, these could probably be done in a table mounter router.

Fix skirt to bottom of worktop with Cascamite glue.

The skirt could be fixed in sections rather than in one complete skirt. This would help with glueing and clamping. I had thought about the sharp corners, I have a small radius edge to overcome this.

Thanks for your help.
 

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Garth

Post some step by step pics so we can follow you and good luck I love the look you are striving for.
 

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The photo shows an edge applied to a butcher block top the crisp corners are from mitered or coped edging. The router top look will be gentler in the corners
 
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