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I have read alot of different things about rust prevention on the boards. I have a question about paste wax, everything I have read says apply it to help protect against rust.

How is everyone applying it, by hand with a rag and then using some sort of buffer to polish the surface?

What have you found to be the best way to apply?
 

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I have read alot of different things about rust prevention on the boards. I have a question about paste wax, everything I have read says apply it to help protect against rust.

How is everyone applying it, by hand with a rag and then using some sort of buffer to polish the surface?

What have you found to be the best way to apply?
apply it...
let it dry..
buffer it..
the more you buffer the harder the wax becomes the better it does it's job..
.
 

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Make sure it doesn't have silicone in the wax. It can transfer and create finishing problems. I've always used a product called Waxilit from Lee Valley. It has lasted a long time. Don't know if they still sell it.
 

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I use Turtle Wax car wax on my Joiner with the cast tables or wings, and my table saw has an Aluminum surface but I still use the wax to make the wood slide nice and smoothly.
 
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To keep rust off your tools, the best way is to keep the relative humidity in your shop below 55%. Keeping the Dew Point of the air in your shop from ever coming close to 90%+. Dew point is the temperature at which the moisture content in the air from condensing on surfaces, like moisture collects on a cold drink glass. It will collect on metal surfaces in your shop if the tools are colder than the air temperature around it too. I control the heat/humidity in my shop by running a heat pump to keep my shop air temperature above freezing and remove excess humidity at the same time. It provides both heating and cooling, and at about 72 deg F it keeps the humidity at about 55%.

It would be good to learn more about dew point and what it means to better understand how to control rusting in your shop. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point. Keeping the shop air/humidity combination well above it's dew point will do wonders for rust prevention. As air is cooled it can no longer hold as much moisture as it could when warm. When the critical temperature is reached and the air can no longer hold this much moisture, the moisture in it begins to collect on surfaces around it forming dew (dewpoint), drops of water, which then causes the ferrous metal to rust.

This makes a big difference, but I also keep Johnson's Paste Wax on all of my tool surfaces. But I do this more for lubrication of the surface than for rust prevention. It does help keep the moisture in the air from reaching the metal to reduce rusting, but surface lubrication is important too. I even use this wax, applied thick with an old tooth brush to the ways and gears of my saws and machines to lubricate them. The wax quickly develops a hard surface coating, so saw dust doesn't readily stick to it like petroleum lubricants, and it does a fine job for this use. I usually use a Teflon lubricant for other bearing and pivot surfaces in the tools.

Charley
 

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I use Johnson's Paste Wax and apply it as described above. For the first few times I waxed the surfaces, I applied the wax and buffed it until it was buffed rather than letting it dry and then buff off. It serves me dual purpose...helps to keep the rust away and allows for smoother movement of the wood...
 

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I use Turtle Wax car wax on my Joiner with the cast tables or wings, and my table saw has an Aluminum surface but I still use the wax to make the wood slide nice and smoothly.
that wax has silicone in it..
not a good plan
 

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To keep rust off your tools, the best way is to keep the relative humidity in your shop below 55%. Keeping the Dew Point of the air in your shop from ever coming close to 90%+. Dew point is the temperature at which the moisture content in the air from condensing on surfaces, like moisture collects on a cold drink glass. It will collect on metal surfaces in your shop if the tools are colder than the air temperature around it too. I control the heat/humidity in my shop by running a heat pump to keep my shop air temperature above freezing and remove excess humidity at the same time. It provides both heating and cooling, and at about 72 deg F it keeps the humidity at about 55%.

It would be good to learn more about dew point and what it means to better understand how to control rusting in your shop. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point. Keeping the shop air/humidity combination well above it's dew point will do wonders for rust prevention. As air is cooled it can no longer hold as much moisture as it could when warm. When the critical temperature is reached and the air can no longer hold this much moisture, the moisture in it begins to collect on surfaces around it forming dew (dewpoint), drops of water, which then causes the ferrous metal to rust.

This makes a big difference, but I also keep Johnson's Paste Wax on all of my tool surfaces. But I do this more for lubrication of the surface than for rust prevention. It does help keep the moisture in the air from reaching the metal to reduce rusting, but surface lubrication is important too. I even use this wax, applied thick with an old tooth brush to the ways and gears of my saws and machines to lubricate them. The wax quickly develops a hard surface coating, so saw dust doesn't readily stick to it like petroleum lubricants, and it does a fine job for this use. I usually use a Teflon lubricant for other bearing and pivot surfaces in the tools.

Charley

Having a heated shop helps prevent what Charley is talking about but I've also heard of covering the tool surfaces with paper or cardboard when not in use too. That also helps prevent dew from forming on the tools.
 

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Having a heated shop helps prevent what Charley is talking about but I've also heard of covering the tool surfaces with paper or cardboard when not in use too. That also helps prevent dew from forming on the tools.
I tried that...
not so good...
 
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Just wondering here---
if air circulation in an enclosed area (garage/basement) would delay the formation of the rust.
I realize that the humidity is in the air and settles out onto a surface
but if the air movement would aid in evaporation of the moisture.

air circulation, as in fans not a dehumidifier/air conditioner.

also curious about covering a surface. Wouldn't that trap the moisture between the cover & the metal thus causing more rust? IIRC the commercial covers are non-porous. Sorta like a cheap table cloth---cotton one one side and some type of plastic material on the other.

maybe putting a container of Damp-Rid on the saw to collect the humidity in the immediate area? Or would that actually attract more humidity to the area?

was thinking of an experiment but a non climate controlled garage is not the best subject.

smitty
 
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I haven't read the label but it's old, I've been using it for many years and never a problem. I'll check the label to see if it lists the contents.
 

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I agrre with you, Smitty. Air movement is extremely helpful, and yes, I tried the tool covering thing; it was a rust nightmare! Must have been a couple of months before I uncovered the TS and discovered the damage. :(

I should add that it's damp here for most of the year...right on the PNW Coast; Charles, up in Cherryville, has dramatically different climate conditions. So may well work better for him.
 

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I tried the paste wax in my uncontrolled work shop and still got rust. I lived in Houston Texas which is about 50 miles from the coast so it is hot and humid in the summer and cold and humid in the winter.

I discovered a product called TopSaver which I get from Amazon. It removes surface rust but more importantly it prevents it. You wipe it on and then wipe off the excess. You can use those 3M non woven green and red pads to remove rust or general funk from your cast iron and it is protected.

Like someone above I cover my machines with clearance table cloths from Bed Bath and Beyond. Only use cotton table cloths so it can breath. The main benefit I get from the table cloth is my shop door is open all day and bugs fly in. Then when I shut the door they buzz around until they die and crash and burn on top of my cast iron. Many larger bugs cause black spots on your cast iron from the moisture in their bodies. An added benefit of the table cloths is spiders do not build webs above my cast iron and spit out their dead victims on my cast iron.

On my bandsaw I got one of those magnetic pads that is like a giant refrigerator magnet. The pad is flexible and I cut a slot so I put the pad around the blade. The magnetic property of the pad keeps the air and humidity out. I still put TopSaver on the cast iron but when I use the saw it is always just like I left it last time it was used.

So the TopSaver I use has been around about 15 years and works great for me. I tried Boeshield and some others with frogs and such but the TopSaver has worked best.
 
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