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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, bought a Ryobi TR-30U trim router at a garage sale (my first trim router). Of the accessories were two guides that mount to the side with a knob. Don't know why I got two as the base will hold only one. I can't figure out how the guide works as when the adjustment of the bearing is adjusted so that it is as far from the center of the base, it is still almost over the center where the bit comes out. Adjusting it the other way takes it completely over where the bit is. In the picture attached, the bearing is at its farthest distance from the center and it is still almost over the top of the center. Anyone know anything about this?

Thanks.
 

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@fishin&routin,
not sure why you have two(are they identical?). One may be for the parallel guide. The one you show, is for routing the edge of a board. In practice, the little bearing wheel should cover almost all of the bit, viewed end-on as you show it. Only the cutting edge of the carbide flutes should be exposed, and then not completely.

The bearing wheel needs to ride on the edge of the board (meaning you cannot use that guide if you want to machine the whole thickness of the edge). If more of the bit were exposed, it would be difficult to keep the router aligned at 90 degrees to the edge, leaving an uneven edge. Ditto if the bit diameter exceeds the bearing wheel diameter.

The guide allows you to follow a curve (convex or concave). For a straight edge. You might find a parallel guide easier to use.
 

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John
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This is a offset edge guide great for irregular shapes ( like putting a groove 1/2 in from edge of a circle)
 

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@Semipro ,
in my hands that would be an invitation for sadness. I accept that someone more skilled could do better, but I would stick to a circle-cutting jig, or a two-point guide attached to the parallel guide (for convex shapes).
 

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There are frequent times when laminate trimming that a router bit with an attached bearing is not the best choice. These attached bearing bits are a great choice for flush trimming, but not the best for trimming laminates, though some frequently get away with it.

The use of this guide allows the bearing to be moved a little further away from the cut, leaving a wider gap between the cut and the bearing rub point. Frequently when laminating, there is enough contact cement at the cutting point to gum up the bits with attached bearings, to the point where the bearing will begin also spinning at the bit speed. This will leave a burn in the laminate where the now spinning bearing is rubbing against it. I got into the habit of not only using a non bearing style bit and one of these guides, but also painting a thin layer of Vaseline petroleum jelly along where the bearing will rub. Even with this separately adjusted bearing, there is a chance that the bearing will leave a mark where it rubs, so this extra lubrication step prevents it. (cheap insurance).

You also need a base plate for that laminate trimmer. Don't use it without one. It can be a full circle, but is frequently horse shoe shaped with an open side so you can view the cut more easily.

Since laminate trimmers get used in all kinds of tight locations, there are usually up to 4 different bases available for them. Did you receive these as well? For my DeWalt I have an off set base, and angle adjustable base a straight base, and a seaming base. Each has it own unique features and ways of using them, but still I sometimes wish for something else.

Charley
 

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@CharleyL,
I bow to the wisdom of your greater experience - one of the benefits of such a forum is exposure to the thoughts of people like you.
However, I am not sure I quite follow you. Any chance of a rough sketch to illustrate what you are saying?

Up to now, I have only used a parallel guide or bearing-mounted bit for laminate trimmimg, with acceptable results - but that was on straight edges of counter tops. Have also only used a straight bit, not one of the specialty laminate trimming bits that produce a slight chamfer.

Always keen to learn a better method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Much thanks to all that replied. I know it's been a while since I responded, but wife has developed some serious medical issues (so far, 3 MRIs, 3 CAT scans, 3 bone marrow densities) and radiation of her spine in two places today. In any case, the responses were great and I think I understand to attachments better now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There are frequent times when laminate trimming that a router bit with an attached bearing is not the best choice. These attached bearing bits are a great choice for flush trimming, but not the best for trimming laminates, though some frequently get away with it.

The use of this guide allows the bearing to be moved a little further away from the cut, leaving a wider gap between the cut and the bearing rub point. Frequently when laminating, there is enough contact cement at the cutting point to gum up the bits with attached bearings, to the point where the bearing will begin also spinning at the bit speed. This will leave a burn in the laminate where the now spinning bearing is rubbing against it. I got into the habit of not only using a non bearing style bit and one of these guides, but also painting a thin layer of Vaseline petroleum jelly along where the bearing will rub. Even with this separately adjusted bearing, there is a chance that the bearing will leave a mark where it rubs, so this extra lubrication step prevents it. (cheap insurance).

You also need a base plate for that laminate trimmer. Don't use it without one. It can be a full circle, but is frequently horse shoe shaped with an open side so you can view the cut more easily.

Since laminate trimmers get used in all kinds of tight locations, there are usually up to 4 different bases available for them. Did you receive these as well? For my DeWalt I have an off set base, and angle adjustable base a straight base, and a seaming base. Each has it own unique features and ways of using them, but still I sometimes wish for something else.

Charley
Hey Charley, first, the router does have a base plate - I just removed it so that the picture would have more clarity. Secondly, I think you provided an excellent explanation that in using this guide, the bearing is a little further away from the cut so that it can avoid the contact cement of the glued laminate. Also, using the Vaseline along the bearing rub provides a smoother cut. Again, thanks.
 
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