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Hi,

I have just purchased a Ryobi RRT1600 Plunge Router and am in the process of setting up a workshop for DIY jobs and hopefully, to restore my long lost youth :smile:

Is this model of router suitable for mounting upside down?

If so, is it relatively easy to make bit depth alterations?

I have a gut feeling that I may have purchased the wrong type of router :frown:
 

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Welcome to the forums N/A...
I'm Stick and do I have some reading for you to do...
much of which can not be ignored or treated lightly ESPECIALLY SAFETY...

there are PDF's here on safety, maintenance, methods, jigs, tooling, accessories, aides, set up, and so much more...

PLEASE take the time to read them.. Your health, welfare and safety matter here...

http://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/133402-welcome-forums.html
 
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Hi,

I have just purchased a Ryobi RRT1600 Plunge Router and am in the process of setting up a workshop for DIY jobs and hopefully, to restore my long lost youth :smile:

Is this model of router suitable for mounting upside down?

If so, is it relatively easy to make bit depth alterations?

I have a gut feeling that I may have purchased the wrong type of router :frown:
I like the way it comes with 1/4" and 1/2" collets, which means you don't have to worry about reducers, it has soft start and speed control.

Practically any router can be put in a table upside down, and you can always use one of those scissor type router lifts from Ebay if you want the cheap and easy route (excuse the pun).

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Router-Lift-HEAVY-DUTY-for-Router-Table-Bench-Woodworking-/331933469784

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I like the way it comes with 1/4" and 1/2" collets, which means you don't have to worry about reducers, it has soft start and speed control.

Practically any router can be put in a table upside down, and you can always use one of those scissor type router lifts from Ebay if you want the cheap and easy route (excuse the pun).

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Router-Lift-HEAVY-DUTY-for-Router-Table-Bench-Woodworking-/331933469784

No Affiliation.
The Cheap router lift ONLY works for Plunge Routers and NOT fixed based routers.
 

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@Zippity - Welcome aboard. Lots of good folks here willing to lend a hand.

Now, about your router. I didn't look up the manual so I will leave the reading to you. Does it mention a way to disable the plunge action by removing a spring (or springs). Without doing that, using it attached to a router plate insert will be a difficult task because you will be fighting the spring(s) each time you try to make a depth adjustment. I wouldn't even try it.

However, it should make a nice router for hand held operations.

Save up your coins and buy a second router with a fixed base that you can leave mounted under a table. There are a lot of insert plates that allow for just that purpose. I have two routers mounted under a table - a Triton 3 1/4hp and a Bosch 1617. They are attached to Kreg mounting plates. No complaints from me.

Good luck with your shop. We will be glad to help you spend your money! :surprise::grin::grin::grin:
 

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@Zippity The Bosch 1617 is highly recommended for table use, in part because its fixed base can be mounted under the table with an above table height adjustment. Here's a picture. Personally, I still use the 1617 freehand and plunge, but put a Triton TRA001 3 1/4 hp in my table. The Triton was made for under table use, and is set up with a crank so you can set height precisely. It also has a safety lock you have to press before you use it. It cranks up very high above the table for easy bit changes. It costs about the same as a lift alone.

If the Ryobi doesn't allow you to convert it to a table model, I'd keep it for freehand use, and seriously consider going for a Triton. You're wise to go for a table mount either way, it's much safer to use a table than freehand, and using larger bits freehand doesn't work well and is pretty risky.

Be sure to download and read the pdfs Stick put up. They cover a lot of territory. Also, you might get a lot from watching videos by Marc Sommerfeld. He sells router related gear, but he started out making cabinets, so his technique is really good and worth learning.

Don't know if you have a commercial table yet, but you might consider making your own. Can be as simple as a chunk of flat ply or as complicated as a fancy cabinet with drawers. Search the Forums for threads on making a router table for details. You'll want to add a mounting plate to your shop made table, Kreg and many other companies make them, often pre-drilled for your router model.

BTW, welcome. As you can tell, there's a ton of experience around here and we love to answer questions. You might also like to read this pdf on the 17 things that really accelerated my learning curve. It also contains suggestions on shop purchases and hopefully will help you avoid mis-spending on tools and accessories.
 

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Many of the newer plunge routers have above the table adjustment capability, I’m not sure about that one though. You still have to reach under the table to lock them in position. I also recommend removing the springs for table use. You can extend the router to the point that the base comes off but there may be one thing to be careful of. Mine have a brass plug that goes between the lock lever and the plunge tube. Make sure that side is down when you remove the base or it can fall out.
 

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Ryobi RRT1600 exploded parts view

Ryobi RRT1600 exploded parts view document attached

Springs easy to remove.
Cheap router lift available
Template guide 68mm like Markita.
Just need an adapter ring to use Porter Cable type template Guide Bush (us: Guide Bushings)

Good 1st Router - with variable speed and 1/2" collet

It is easy to make a table top lift with ANY plunge router.
In fact if you get a cheap ALU plate AUD$73 it comes with a DIY Tabletop router lift kit for you too.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Aluminu...179620?hash=item3b0132d764:g:mEoAAOSwSFJagV8K
Plastic insert shown already accepts 1 3/8" type Porter cable Guide Bushings - I know as I have one.
NO NEED OF a TRITON OR BOSCH just to get a tabletop lift.
 

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As you probably have realised by now, for table mounting the springs must be removed. I've no hands on experience with this very nice router but I would think that removing the fine adjustment knob, it will take many turns, will allow the body to lift off the base with the springs sticking out ready to remove. It is most important to remember that the springs MUST be replaced if you ever want to use it hand held where it should perform perfectly, having reasonable power, variable speed, soft start and a multi-step turret.
 
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My plunges have a brass plug that goes between the column lock lever and the plunge tube. If yours has one it can fall out when you remove the base. Make that side is down so it doesn’t happen.
 

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As you probably have realised by now, for table mounting the springs must be removed. I've no hands on experience with this very nice router but I would think that removing the fine adjustment knob, it will take many turns, will allow the body to lift off the base with the springs sticking out ready to remove. It is most important to remember that the springs MUST be replaced if you ever want to use it hand held where it should perform perfectly, having reasonable power, variable speed, soft start and a multi-step turret.
Hi Harry
"MUST" is too strong a word.

As Philip suggested earlier there is a cheap heavy duty router lift available (AUD35) for plunge routers.
If one use such a lift, IMHO it won't be necessary to remove the springs.

I once remove the springs of my router then decided to put them back even though I only have a screw type lift.
 

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Hi Harry
"MUST" is too strong a word.

As Philip suggested earlier there is a cheap heavy duty router lift available (AUD35) for plunge routers.
If one use such a lift, IMHO it won't be necessary to remove the springs.

I once remove the springs of my router then decided to put them back even though I only have a screw type lift.
That's funny. I made one once to help "lift" a router that was hard wired into a Harbor Freight table. Yep, it was a plunge type router and miserable to adjust. So, I got a scissor jack and placed it under the router. Worked as well as could be expected.
 

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DIY lift

When you buy a AU insert plate (see my earlier post) it comes with a DIY lift kit (see attached).

For many plunge router such as my Hitachi M12V it is very easy implement. Just replace the side threaded rod that holds the base to the router motor with this long bolt provided. You just need to drill a hole on the base plate and a bigger hole on the sub base and the AL insert

The T-allen key provided allows lifting the router from on top of the table. If you know the TPI you can adjust the height by counting the number of turns or quarter turns of the T-allen key. If you think that is too slow, just fix a hex bit to your cordless drill so that you can move your plunge router up and down more quickly depending on the speed of the drill.
THERE is NO NEED to remove the springs then.
Removing the springs may even be bad if you are using spiral bits as the router may creep upwards or vibrate when there are no springs to hold it down.

BUT since the RYOBI RRT1600 has a 4 year replacement warranty, it is best to just buy and use the scissors lift & don't remove the springs to avoid voiding the warranty.
 

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As you probably have realised by now, for table mounting the springs must be removed. I've no hands on experience with this very nice router but I would think that removing the fine adjustment knob, it will take many turns, will allow the body to lift off the base with the springs sticking out ready to remove. It is most important to remember that the springs MUST be replaced if you ever want to use it hand held where it should perform perfectly, having reasonable power, variable speed, soft start and a multi-step turret.
I think you might have miss-read what I wrote......"It is most important to remember that the springs MUST be replaced if you ever want to use it hand held where it should perform perfectly"
"If you ever want to use it HANDHELD"
 

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My router plate is only held in by gravity so using a scissor lift without removing the springs wouldn’t work very well. Fortunately my M12V2 has above table adjustment capability.
 

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Some years ago I was busy with a number of projects and happened to be in our local recycling depot when I saw a table top router table which I bought for $3.00! I then went to our local pawn shop, The Cash Converters, and bought a Ryobi router which I modified for above table height adjustment. Here are a few shots taken during the conversion. This conversion idea could probably be used on many different routers.
 

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