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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a Ryobi RTS21G Table saw curbside. I had to buy some of the accessories and the motor bearings were shot.

I pulled the motor and replaced all bearings, arbor and the brushes and it sounds great!

However, I neglected to document EXACTLY how the motor is mounted.

I have it all back together but when I try to turn the crank to raise and lower the motor, it binds up and doesn't do anything.

I started with everything cranked down and that definitely didn't work. Then I loosened up different parts but I still can't get to a point where it smoothly raises and lowers. Maybe this was broken when I picked it up but I also don't recall it not working.

Does anyone have one of these and able to tell me how the mechanism is supposed to work?

The pull rod screws are circled in orange, the motor screws are light blue and the support plate screw is circled in green.

Are the motor screws supposed to slide in the slots?

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Welcome to the forum, @hazardsneon .

I wonder if this video might help?

Does the support plate screw slide?

 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That video helps a little. I will definitely be cleaning up the threads and oiling but I still don't know what are the moving parts in my picture.

With regards to the support plate screw, that does not slide freely. I am able to put some weight behind it to move it but it does not slide in the slot. That would probably help if I could free that up.

Thanks!
 

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Paul
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I'm not familiar with that saw. Is it possible the red screws should let that bar pivot? Maybe try loosening those, just a bit and try and see if it works. They look like lock nuts, so they should stay even when not completely tight. That bar could be like a lever, I see it has a cut-out to be able to get closer to the motor. Is that a spare part in the top left of the pic? ;-)
 

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Paul
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Maybe all three lock-nuts should be free? I think the slots for the motor screws could be an adjustment for the highest and lowest blade position. Can you see marks from the original screw positions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the input!

I believe you are right about the three lock-nuts being free. It just seemed weird on the support plate bracket because it just doesn't look like it is something that should be easily moved but I loosened it up and could get some more movement. I haven't had a whole lot of time to work on this in the past week but my next move is going to be cleaning up and oiling that support plate and making sure it has some good washers that allow it to move. Maybe upgrade with some teflon washers so I'm not relying on oiling?

I'm still not positive on the 3 motor screws. I cranked those down but being a philips head, there is only so much I can put behind tightening those and when I was playing with it, those still moved in the slots. It is hard to tell if there was an original position but it looks like the most counter clockwise position. However, unless I did some loctite, there is nothing keeping those screws from working their way out, if they are meant to be loose.

Just for the record, those spare parts are the washer and nut for the arbor :)
 

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Paul
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I think the screws need to be tight but there's probably a proceedure to position them. The location of the screws might determine how high the blade is at that crank position. If that setting is incorrect you might be too close to the top (or bottom) to achieve the full range of blade travel. So maybe you crank the handle to 'this' position and adjust the shaft to a certain height??? The screws would have to have shoulders (or sleeves) if they were meant to stay loose.

ps I'm just guessing about all this. ;-)
 

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Paul
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I've made up a new 'proceedure': Loosen the screws and crank the handle to the maximum 'blade up' position. The weight of the motor should put it in the 'up' position (when the saw is upside down). Tighten the screws. Maybe crank the handle a half turn (or so) back before tightening (to compensate for linkage slop). If this 'proceedure' doesn't allow the blade to go below the surface of the table, then we might need a third revision. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It turns out that those three motor/arbor screws have shoulders on them. So that explains why I can tighten them down and it doesn't keep the motor in the same location. I was rushing through re-assembly and overlooked that part and didn't think to check that.
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Those 3 screws just need some new loctite and I think I'm set.
I sprayed some white lithium grease on the raising/lower mechanism screw threads. Adding this grease helped ALOT to make it move smoother and easier.

Thanks for all the help!
 

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Paul
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Good to hear you got it figured out. Grease could accumulate sawdust. Some would use a dry lube like graphite. i think the threads are kinda hidden in a box, so you might be okay.
 
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