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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here’s a classic case of brand conditioning at work. I have been using Craftsman drills for years. I’ve had many of them and used and abused them. Flat wore them out. I’m talking falling from ladders and off of roofs abuse, and overheating from hard long use. Left in the sun for hours and expected to run. Used in the rain and put up wet. Left in the bed of the truck in the rain. Batteries left in frigid temps in the truck, and charged and recharged no telling how many times, used and drained, sometimes put on charge and left for days instead of an hour because I forgot them. These drills and batteries have took it all like a champ (‘cept that one that shattered from a 2 story fall to concrete, but it’s not the only one that did that, just the only one to break from it). I’m running three of them now that are 6-7 years old and still kickin’ it like new.

I always chose Craftsman because they held up and didn’t cost much. I just discovered they have been made by Ryobi all along. I believe mine are Ryobi drills based on the 315 in the first part of the model number (315.115430 and 315.119100). But when it comes to the name Ryobi I’ve always thought of it as cheap and not likely to last. I’ve had zero experience with products under that name yet I’ve never had any interest in it just because of what I’ve heard. Then, just now as I was reading and learning about them I literally, consciously, felt my opinion of that brand change. I suddenly feel confident now that I could buy one and use it just as hard as the Craftsmans and expect it to last (as long as I don’t drop it 2 stories, more than once).

I’m beginning to look at new drills because of the age of my current ones. Not that they are fading or failing. Just that “it’s time”.
 

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My experience with Ryobi hasn't been that good. OK for small items though. I think they are the only company that has standardized their batteries, and the same battery powers most everything across their product lines, power tools and landscaping tools. Wish others would do that.
 

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then you'll step up to Bosch...
 

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Don't have any battery powered tools, except flashlights. But all my routers are Ryobi,and the newest one is probably around 10+ years old. So far they're all doing fine, and I'm not planning on replacing any until the last one dies. For what I do, they work just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
then you'll step up to Bosch...
I’ve been looking at a Bosch drill too. I like its compact light weight size but it’s not a hammer drill. Where I work I have intermittent need to drill into concrete floors for repairs of bifold closet doors and carpet thresholds coming loose and sometimes drilling into brick for downspout repairs, so I occasionally need the hammer option, but mostly I use a regular drill everyday for hanging blinds, removing HVAC cover panels, drywall repairs, door repairs, and more. So I need light weight for all the use it will see but with the hammer option so I don’t have to carry two drills (like I do now) and not all that expensive because it’s just for apartment maintenance. Bosch makes a hammer drill that meets the specs but it’s more than twice as expensive as I’d like to pay. They also make a sweet little 3 pound drill without the hammer option that I can get for just $100 and if all I needed was just a drill I’d get that right now. I’d like to get by with just $100 and so found a Ryobi hammer drill that looks like it could be the one. But if it’s bulky then it’s a deal breaker. My old Craftsman is a hulk and I don’t use it everyday for that reason, I carry a smaller Craftsman standard drill for most things. I need to go handle one in the store to know. Online pics make it difficult to tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Don't have any battery powered tools, except flashlights. But all my routers are Ryobi,and the newest one is probably around 10+ years old. So far they're all doing fine, and I'm not planning on replacing any until the last one dies. For what I do, they work just fine.
Oh man, batteries are my past, present, and future. I’ve had to use a cordless drill for years just due to my work in construction so I got use to the weight of Ni-Cd battery tools. But they weren’t a lot of good in other tools like saws. Just didn’t last long enough. But Lithium Ion batteries changed the game! Far longer lasting, no fading of power, just full on energy until falling flat when needing charged, and less than half the weight. And apparently their lifetime is longer than Ni-Cd also. I’m going on 6 years for my current Lithium batteries, which were my first. If this is the normal expectation, I’ll cut the cord for everything possible.

In a little bit of a twist on the Grinch’s words, when it comes to lithium battery powered tools I’ll say “the future is bright and the power is *****in’!”
 

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Ryobi is good when they work, but, if they need parts, just throw them out, because Ryobi has a bad habit of discontinuing most parts for their tools so you go and buy a new tool!.. most other manufacturers have a much better record!..
 

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then you'll step up to Bosch...
Loved the 2 Bosch drills that I had UNTIL Bosch went and changed the position of the battery post so that their new replacement batteries would not fit in the base of their old drills. To have the 4 batteries rebuilt would cost the about the same as the new Makita drill & Impact tool that I replaced them with. Not using the Makita's under shop conditions anymore but like them so far (love the compact Makita impact drill)

Craftsman has always produced a good average use tool but their not really built for heavy daily use (IMHO). Like most things that Sears sold they have always been made for Sears, under contract, by other manufacturers, and that changed from time to time. If you really search you will find that that it true for many tools and appliances. Last I heard the Craftsman brand was bought by ACE hardware. I have an old Ryobi BT 3000 table saw that has held up well and it mirrored a saw Sears sold. I used it for small tasks when I didn't want to change the setup on my bigger saw. (changing the bearings in the drive motor is a pain though)
 

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Ryobi is good when they work, but, if they need parts, just throw them out, because Ryobi has a bad habit of discontinuing most parts for their tools so you go and buy a new tool!.. most other manufacturers have a much better record!..
Prior to their demise you could find parts at Sears for Ryobi tools. For the Ryobi saw that I have I've found parts online from other suppliers. Ryobi continued building the saw for Sears long after they discontinued it in their line of tools (upgraded to 15 hp). Found out that the bearings in the older model BT 3000 saw were skate bearings which can be bought on Amazon pretty cheap. For anyone who has that particular saw there is an online group that has a lot of info available. Not pushing Ryobi, the saw is the only of their tools I inherited so it has sentimental value.
 

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I've got 2 Ryobi drills, and an impact driver... all the Ryobi One+ system, and have no complaints so far. 3 batteries as well. Mind you, they don't get the use that YOURS obviously do, but they work just fine for me.
 

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Duane I have a corded hammer/drill combination I got from Canadian Tire which is similar to Harbor Freight. As a drill it is close to useless as it spins too fast and with too little torque for most drilling applications. It does okay as a hammer drill but it is also heavy because of the hammering mechanism and that’s without adding the weight of a battery if you were thinking of going cordless. There may be better options than mine but check the specks carefully and look for reviews before buying.

For the small jobs you mentioned I think it would be hard to beat something like Milwaukee’s 12 volt flex drill/ driver. My son in law has one and it has decent power and is small and light.
 

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Ryobi bought-out the old Singer Sewing Machine building in South Carolina a number of years back. For the price, they're pretty good tools.
Many years ago (late 1970's) a lot of the Craftsman Electric Power Tools were manufactured by Emerson Electric, but I do believe that Ryobi is making some of the Craftsman stuff, lately. The lifetime warranty on tools for Craftsman was on wrenches, screwdrivers, stuff like that. It was not intended to be applied to their power tools (although I've heard some convincing stories to the contrary). Usually the drills and circular saws were guaranteed for only one year.
In the concrete formwork warehouse where the Pocket Form Isolators are fabricated, my workers are able to purchase whichever tools they choose...
Usually the (cordless) drills chosen are the DeWalt 20V and everyone loves them. Interestingly several of the guys (with any choices they wish) have chosen to go with the Ryobi (corded) routers. They appreciate the weight, the handle-ability, the visibility of the workpiece and the ease and convenience of swapping-out router bits. We try to select tools that are universally acceptable to all of the workers - whether they are right or left handed.

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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Back in the 70s, Singer made power tools for Craftsman. They were one of my customers. That is where I learned that Sears changes a few parts from the OEM product so all parts won't interchange. If Sears runs out of parts, you are outta luck. I have Ryobi tools and have six dead batteries. Will go to another brand when I get the $$$$$$.
 

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Would it blow your mind even more to know that Ryobi and Milwaukee power tools are under Techtronic Industries.

Bosch, Dremel, RotoZip, Freud, Vermont American are under Robert Bosch.

DeWalt, Porter-Cable, Oldham Saw Company, Black & Decker, Stanley Hand Tools, Craftsman, Pastorino, Bostitch, Power Fasteners, Mac Tools, Irwin, Husky, Lennox/American Saw Co. are all under Stanley Black & Decker. Craftsman was a relatively recent acquisition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Back in the 70s, Singer made power tools for Craftsman. They were one of my customers. That is where I learned that Sears changes a few parts from the OEM product so all parts won't interchange. If Sears runs out of parts, you are outta luck. I have Ryobi tools and have six dead batteries. Will go to another brand when I get the $$$$$$.
Are all of your batteries lithium or NiCd?
 
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