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In July, I'm going to re-make my shop. I'm planning to make a router table cabinet, a new table for a new spindle sander & belt sander, and add a Probotix Nebula CNC. I'm going to fix things in my shop - honest - so I can be more efficient. This post is about project # 1.

Last year, I converted from a pair of Bosch ROSs to Festool. I use a 5" to do edges of the cutting boards & such that I make ... and a 6" to do the big surfaces. This was a huge tool upgrade. Way worth the cost ... which was not small.

That stated, you now see my unchanged "sanding station" which is now totally wrong for what I do. It's a small shelf structure that sits on top of a rolling cut-off shelf unit. I'm probably going to upgrade that, as well ... but the basic idea of the sanding organizer won't change. It will live on top of the rolling cut-off shelf unit, so the size is customizable at this point.

Do you have plans for a good organizer for me? Do you have a picture? Can you help? Please?

Here's what I want to do:

1. Organize my 5" and 6" sanding discs in 5 grits: 80, 120, 180, 220 and 320.
2. Have a storage place for overstocked discs: I keep a few boxes of each size in various grits so I will never run out. Yes, I am a volume operation at times. It's not unusual to use a box of discs in a weekend, though I probably have as many boxes today as I should ever have. Maybe too many.
3. Store my 2 Festool ROSs: RO 150 FEQ Rotex and ETS EC 125 EQ
4. Store my miscellaneous sanding tools, which include a few sheets of 8-1/2" x 11" 100 grit, a couple of miscellaneous sanding tools, and a couple of bowl sanders with associated accessories.

My current organizer has removable 6x shelves for the 5" discs and none for the 6" discs. The sanding tools don't fit into the remaining shelves. There is no space for the ROSs. Anywhere.

So, o wise ones, can you help me?
 

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Cant help on the organisation side, but I am interested in your choices of grit. Do you actually need that many? is there a real difference between 80 and 120? and 180 and 220?
I'm trying to work out how many grits I need. So far I am getting by on 80, 150, 220, and 320, but would like to drop one of those (150?) purely on storage space and you obviously do way more work than I do so should know better than me.
 

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Cant help on the organisation side, but I am interested in your choices of grit. Do you actually need that many? is there a real difference between 80 and 120? and 180 and 220?
I'm trying to work out how many grits I need. So far I am getting by on 80, 150, 220, and 320, but would like to drop one of those (150?) purely on storage space and you obviously do way more work than I do so should know better than me.
Bob if I was going to drop a grit it would be the 320. Going from 80 to 220 is a big jump. But if it were me I would keep all of them.
 

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In July, I'm going to re-make my shop. I'm planning to make a router table cabinet, a new table for a new spindle sander & belt sander, and add a Probotix Nebula CNC. I'm going to fix things in my shop - honest - so I can be more efficient. This post is about project # 1.

Last year, I converted from a pair of Bosch ROSs to Festool. I use a 5" to do edges of the cutting boards & such that I make ... and a 6" to do the big surfaces. This was a huge tool upgrade. Way worth the cost ... which was not small.

That stated, you now see my unchanged "sanding station" which is now totally wrong for what I do. It's a small shelf structure that sits on top of a rolling cut-off shelf unit. I'm probably going to upgrade that, as well ... but the basic idea of the sanding organizer won't change. It will live on top of the rolling cut-off shelf unit, so the size is customizable at this point.

Do you have plans for a good organizer for me? Do you have a picture? Can you help? Please?

Here's what I want to do:

1. Organize my 5" and 6" sanding discs in 5 grits: 80, 120, 180, 220 and 320.
2. Have a storage place for overstocked discs: I keep a few boxes of each size in various grits so I will never run out. Yes, I am a volume operation at times. It's not unusual to use a box of discs in a weekend, though I probably have as many boxes today as I should ever have. Maybe too many.
3. Store my 2 Festool ROSs: RO 150 FEQ Rotex and ETS EC 125 EQ
4. Store my miscellaneous sanding tools, which include a few sheets of 8-1/2" x 11" 100 grit, a couple of miscellaneous sanding tools, and a couple of bowl sanders with associated accessories.

My current organizer has removable 6x shelves for the 5" discs and none for the 6" discs. The sanding tools don't fit into the remaining shelves. There is no space for the ROSs. Anywhere.

So, o wise ones, can you help me?
Henry I have been thinking about your question and it's very hard to answer. I am not there in your shop and can't see what else you have going on. One thing I see is you have a lot of sanding over stock. Can you reduce your quantities and order more often? Or maybe you could fined another place to store it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cant help on the organisation side, but I am interested in your choices of grit. Do you actually need that many? is there a real difference between 80 and 120? and 180 and 220?
I'm trying to work out how many grits I need. So far I am getting by on 80, 150, 220, and 320, but would like to drop one of those (150?) purely on storage space and you obviously do way more work than I do so should know better than me.
I definitely think all 5 grits are needed. I will sometimes skip 80 if my piece is already very smooth from the planer, but 80 knocks down those prominent bumps better than 120 (I even have one box of 40 that I rarely use, but when I've had a really bad glue-up, it works better than using multiple sheets of 80).

I take every surface to 180. Cutting board tops go to 320. I absolutely feel a difference with every step in grit, and would not change. I've had others ask if it's necessary to do all of the grits, and my answer is it is, for me. The results are glass smooth, too.

I do have more boxes of discs than I need. I order through Amazon, and am experimenting with monthly shipments that save me 5% of the cost when I buy 5x items. As you can see, I'm dating the boxes so I can keep track of what I'm using when ... and I'll be slowing down some shipments. On the other hand, I'm on my last box of 180 5", so I ordered another to come in July ... I'm always out of something.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Can you reduce your quantities and order more often? Or maybe you could fined another place to store it.
I definitely am working to reduce my quantities; that will eliminate perhaps 4 boxes from the overstock.

I'm open to another place to store the extra boxes. I'm going to be looking hard at storage in all of my new cabinets & such that I build next month, so maybe an opportunity will pop up.
 

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I definitely think all 5 grits are needed. I will sometimes skip 80 if my piece is already very smooth from the planer, but 80 knocks down those prominent bumps better than 120 (I even have one box of 40 that I rarely use, but when I've had a really bad glue-up, it works better than using multiple sheets of 80).

I take every surface to 180. Cutting board tops go to 320. I absolutely feel a difference with every step in grit, and would not change. I've had others ask if it's necessary to do all of the grits, and my answer is it is, for me. The results are glass smooth, too.

I do have more boxes of discs than I need. I order through Amazon, and am experimenting with monthly shipments that save me 5% of the cost when I buy 5x items. As you can see, I'm dating the boxes so I can keep track of what I'm using when ... and I'll be slowing down some shipments. On the other hand, I'm on my last box of 180 5", so I ordered another to come in July ... I'm always out of something.


I order mine through Toolnut. No taxes as well as free shipping.
 

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I definitely am working to reduce my quantities; that will eliminate perhaps 4 boxes from the overstock.

I'm open to another place to store the extra boxes. I'm going to be looking hard at storage in all of my new cabinets & such that I build next month, so maybe an opportunity will pop up.
I went to Festool sanders a couple of years ago, and like you I decided to reorganize my shop over the winter. I don't have near the sanding supplies you do, and I only use the ROS to 180. The only exception is if I am using multiple coats of shellac or lacquer where I sand up to 3000 between coats. The Granat paper lasts such a long time I don't find a need to keep a lot of supply on hand. Anyway here is how my sand paper is stored now. I repurposed an old shop cabinet by cutting it down and adding 5 drawers, and used one of the drawers for sanding.
 

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Cant help on the organisation side, but I am interested in your choices of grit. Do you actually need that many? is there a real difference between 80 and 120? and 180 and 220?
I'm trying to work out how many grits I need. So far I am getting by on 80, 150, 220, and 320, but would like to drop one of those (150?) purely on storage space and you obviously do way more work than I do so should know better than me.
Each grit produces a successively finer scratch pattern and when you jump a sizeable number of grits it takes that much longer to replace the coarser scratch pattern with the finer one. Any finer grit will replace a coarse scratch pattern but the issue becomes how long it takes and how much of the finer paper will you go through doing it. I also don't go much above 180 grit when power sanding bare wood but I have finer grits when a better finish is required, usually on hardwoods.
 
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