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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Back in the beginning of May I was asked by a gentleman to carve a memorial for his wife in the top of the stump of a tree he had removed in his front yard. The tree stump was 52" x 51". (Big stump, but about 5" or 6" high.)

Took me a bit to get over there; my breathing being as bad as it was all summer. But, I made it over there Saturday and here was the end result 馃檭 He was instructed to put something over it to protect it, as it is gonna age (I recommended white but he wanted black and wouldn't let us get the tree to look freshly cut again... wanted the weathering in there) so... as long as he's happy. Never did a freehand on a tree stump; it was an adventure to say the least. (I was a sight to behold, laying on those shop floor cushion mats with my @$$ in the air, carving this thing :lol: )
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You did great, Barb. Carving end grain 5" off the ground with a chainsawed face, on your knees, must be some kind of world record.You are really good!
Herb
Thanks. But trust me... I was NOT on my knees! I have those rubber cushion mats they sell that Ken got from a customer... they're like 2' x 2' wide, and go together like a puzzle. Anyway, I brought four of them with me, and stacked them to use as a padding to lay on. I draped them at the bottom of the stump, and worked my way up to the top of the stump.

We spent probably 30 minutes prepping the stump between using my router and a flat bit to get rid of one really badly raised portion, the belt sander, and the orbital to get it smooth enough to transfer my pattern on the wood. Then it was me lying on the padding I draped, with my sign bit, (Used one up...) trying to follow the pattern. I was the center of attention of the neighborhood :haha:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, guys. Ken was a huge help on this one. He helped transfer the pattern, kept the sawdust back (using the air compressor we brought with us) helped paint the lettering, and did the final sanding.

I'm gettin too old (and already too fat) to get down on the ground like that... I was completely drained and ready for bed by 9:00 Saturday Night. Now to get my picture from the customer after he got the Poly put on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Again, Guys...

Ken tells me as I'm reading him your comments, that while I was laying on my stomach cutting this, he took a couple pictures. He proceeded to send them to me: Here's what I'm willing to share :lol: Trying to haul myself up from the ground was the comedy portion of the show...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I didn鈥檛 realize you used a cordless router Barb. Makes perfect sense for a job like this .
In your shop do you use a corded router for signs .

I must say you did pretty impressive work , and am amazed it鈥檚 done free hand
Thank you, Rick.

I use both in the shop. I usually use the cordless for the edges, to avoid the cord getting in the way.
 
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
And you didn't even skin your elbows, I am impressed. Did you do that on one battery?
Herb
Nope, no skinned elbows, but when I was changing out bits, one of those little stinkers bit me pretty good on the back of my hand!

I would say it was two, Herb. The first battery was a little one, and Ken changed it out when he thought it sounded like it was getting low (but I don't think it was). The second one actually stopped in the middle of a cut, resulting in Ken changing to the third. That's the funny thing about my cordless; when it's done, there's no warning. It's done, and it just STOPS. Like someone put a brake on; that's been one of the things we've had to adjust to going from corded to cordless: When you turn off a cordless, the turning stops on a dime. When turning off a corded machine, it stops gradually.
 
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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Couldn't do that on a CNC. lol

Good Show!!
That's Riiiiiiight LOL funny you said that; over the weekend I thought of you, John. I was like: try THAT with your CNC, John :haha: and thanks. It was definitely an adventure.
 
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Barb, how long had the tree been cut down. Was the stump still green? I have seen stumps stay green for a long time because it takes awhile for the roots to die. Once they die at the surface they start to crack badly. That one appeared to have some dead heart wood when it was alive, but no large cracks.
Herb
When he asked me in May, Herb, it had been cut down a week or so, I want to say. It had been partially taken out by a storm we had (having a large limb land on his car) so he had it removed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #33 · (Edited)
**Update**

Thank you. It was a fun if not exhausting afternoon. He finally sent me the picture of the stump after he put on the poly. Here's the final look:
 

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