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Since we're on a race to the cheapest. Dig a depression in the dirt and line it with some plastic trash bags. :wink:
And there's a problem with finding the most economical solution? Maybe you could elaborate.
 

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look for a large frying pan w/lid or the like at those thrift stores...
 

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I use the lid from a five gallon bucket... and trend spray blade cleaner with a plastic detail brush, hardly any effort. Rinse with hot water and wipe the blade. Drip dry the lid, then store the lid in a drawer. Works for me... durable and easy.
 

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@sreilly

Go to Big Box garden center...flower pot bottoms that you put under flower pots so as not to leak water on the floor...REAL CHEAP ! Any size you want...
 

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@sreilly

Go to Big Box garden center...flower pot bottoms that you put under flower pots so as not to leak water on the floor...REAL CHEAP ! Any size you want...
what about the lid???
 

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I had searched for these before but the tapered shape and the $$$$ far exceeds practical use. The best I could find were used and the cost plus shipping was far excessive for it's intended use. I appreciate the effort but it just doesn't make sense to spend that much and it still won't do the 12" blades. I had hoped to see something at this years State Fair but of course that was wisely cancelled.
I was going to say Tupperware also. I have found several pieces at our local thrift shop / Goodwill or Salvation Army stores for cheap. Here is one on Ebay but I bet if you check out the thrift shops you can find one. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tupperware-12-Round-Cupcake-Pie-Cookie-Carrier-Keeper-242-with-Lid/164333684475?hash=item26430d06fb:g:wasAAOSw-DhfM0GD
 

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I use the lid from a five gallon bucket... and trend spray blade cleaner with a plastic detail brush, hardly any effort. Rinse with hot water and wipe the blade. Drip dry the lid, then store the lid in a drawer. Works for me... durable and easy.
I bought a few 5 gallon buckets at HD. I use the buckets to store my longer cut offs, I use the lids to clean my table saw blades. They fit perfectly in the top of the lid and the top has a lip around it to prevent drips. I spray the blade, use an old tooth brush for any of the stubborn stuff then rinse under warm water and dry with a paper towel. Since I'm spraying on the blade and bit cleaner I don't save it. 8 oz bottle lasts me years but I'm a hobbyist so don't need to clean the blades daily or even weekly, sometimes. I cut almost exclusively hardwoods and some plywood and change blades for rips and crosscuts, having several blades for each. If I only used a combination blade or cut more softwoods I'd have to clean the blades more frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I bought a few 5 gallon buckets at HD. I use the buckets to store my longer cut offs, I use the lids to clean my table saw blades. They fit perfectly in the top of the lid and the top has a lip around it to prevent drips. I spray the blade, use an old tooth brush for any of the stubborn stuff then rinse under warm water and dry with a paper towel. Since I'm spraying on the blade and bit cleaner I don't save it. 8 oz bottle lasts me years but I'm a hobbyist so don't need to clean the blades daily or even weekly, sometimes. I cut almost exclusively hardwoods and some plywood and change blades for rips and crosscuts, having several blades for each. If I only used a combination blade or cut more softwoods I'd have to clean the blades more frequently.
The process seems straightforward but rinsing in water seems counterproductive as it would/could eliminate the protective coating that the cleaner, at least mine, leaves. The directions on the CMT cleaner reads:

" Formula 2050
Finally a safe, environmentally-friendly cleaner that is more effective than all those hazardous chemicals used for cleaning cutting tools.

Saw shops know how to get the most out of cutting tools. They know that the pitch and resin left by wood on tools greatly shortens the useful life of carbide. Therefore we asked many blade sharpeners to test Formula 2050 and they rated it as an excellent product. Most blade and bit cleaning products work with dissolving action, but it takes some power and nasty chemicals to dissolve wood residues and adhesives. CMT’s non-toxic and safe Formula 2050 penetrates the microscopic cracks in the resin and attacks the bond between carbide or steel surfaces and the resin itself. Formula 2050 keeps your tools clean and helps you increase the life span between sharpening and replacement.

-Removes pitch, resin and adhesive residue from all woodworking cutting tools (saw blades, router bits, drill bits, shaper cutters, planer blades, etc.).

-Completely non-toxic, non-flammable and certified biodegradable. Formula 2050 is a safe, earth-friendly product.

-Do not rinse after cleaning. Formula 2050 provides protection from rust and corrosion. Keeps your table saw top rust free too!

-Can be applied by spray bottle or used in ultrasonic cleaners and dip tanks.



This product received a five-star performance rating from "Wood® Magazine".

I've used this product a number of times and it has a faint non offensive odor, is easy on the hands, and cleans quite well. I usually soak the blade for a minute or two and then use a nylon brush to lightly go over the teeth and gullet area, flip over and do the other side. I'll inspect the blade for any resistant pitch and so forth and use the brush again if needed. Lay the clean blade on an old towel and wipe dry. Store back in it's blade holder and put in the cabinet. Typically maybe 3-4 minutes per blade. I usually clean the blades when I see that brown coloring on the teeth and or what looks like burning on the wood, the light brown not dark. The dark is indeed burning while the light brown usually a result of the dirty blade.

A friend had recently complained about his Woodworker II 48 tooth blade not giving him clean cuts and felt it needed sharpening. He brought it over and I cleaned it, then installed it on my table saw cutting white oak, mahogany, and poplar. Was a total surprise to him. Hopefully he'll clean his own blades now.
 

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Discussion Starter #32

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The process seems straightforward but rinsing in water seems counterproductive as it would/could eliminate the protective coating that the cleaner, at least mine, leaves. The directions on the CMT cleaner reads: ...
Steve, you're probably right about the rinsing. The Blade and Bit cleaner I use says wipe dry but also does not indicate that it provides any additional protection. I do use Boshield T-9 for that but not on my blades. I will try that to see if it helps to decrease the build up on the blade. Due to back issues and a cataract removal, I've been out of the shop for a couple of months. The FL heat and humidity have also contributed to that since mine is a garage shop. My first foray back into the shop will be at the end of this week and I'm guessing that my rip blade will need to be cleaned. I'll wipe the blade dry that hit with the T-9. Here in Florida rust (and mold) are a constant threat. I've used several different protective sprays on the cast iron surfaces of my jointer and band saw but lately I've just been using Johnson's paste wax and haven't had any problems. What do you use on cast iron?
 
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Discussion Starter #34
I have used the Boeshield products to clean off any rust spots that appear and then use Johnson's Bowling Ally Wax. If no issues arise I may later spray some Bostik Glidecote when the surface gets less slippery.
 

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I have used the Boeshield products to clean off any rust spots that appear and then use Johnson's Bowling Ally Wax. If no issues arise I may later spray some Bostik Glidecote when the surface gets less slippery.
I also use Glidecote. Wasn't aware of the bowling ally wax. Just looked it up. Pricey compare to the regular stuff. Must be high in Carnauba wax. I use that in my cutting board wax recipe to balance the softness of the bees wax. A can of the bowling ally wax would probably last me into the next life which probably isn't all that far way from where I'm looking at it.:smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Of course there's also just the SC Johnson's Paste Wax as well. The main thing is it not having silicon if I remember correctly. Someone correct me if I'm wrong about this.....
 

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Another option for a pan is pie container. They have 10" pies at Sam's Club for $7-$9 and larger pies on occasion.



Worse case scenario, the plastic is punctured and you "need" to buy another pie.
 

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5 gallon bucket lid...
I agree with Stick. Bucket lids work great for up to 10" blades. Be careful when you purchase a lid because not all lids will have a cross section that works well for blade cleaning. In my case, the top side of the lid worked best.

Years ago, an experienced woodworker gave me a small jar with "Sal Soda" that he used to clean his saw blades. At the time, I never questioned to origin of Sal Soda but it appears as if it was a likely laundry product of Arm & Hammer. Once when I tried to use this product, I used a bucket lid with water in it and submerged the saw blade. It took me longer than expected to find the Sal Soda and by the time I returned to the blade, there was all kind of gunk that had floated to the top. I ended up not using the Sal Soda. If you want to save a few pennies worth of your expensive cleaner, soak it in water first. Water by itself will obviously not have any lubricating properties that the expensive cleaning products claim to have.

It appears as if Sal Soda is basically sodium carbonate. Arm & Hammer presently makes the product shown in the attached photo.
 

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Of course there's also just the SC Johnson's Paste Wax as well. The main thing is it not having silicon if I remember correctly. Someone correct me if I'm wrong about this.....
i use the yellow can. Has lasted for years. Silicon is a no-no. Will cause finishing problems.
 
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