Router Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is my shop built router jig that can accurately cut dovetail slots and pins, as well box finger joints.
The jig is shown in Fig. 1-3 and its key features include
• Box frame of ½” MDT: approximately 6” X 6” X 18” overall
• ¼” thick 6" X 6" Aluminum carriage plate
• 3/8” X 16 screw attached to carriage plate with angle brackets carriage plate
• 1/8” X 2” steel angle clamping mechanism
• V-groove bearings that support the carriage on V-rails
• 12” Digital read-out
• 1/8” X 2” guide bar with a pivot hole and three holes to align the guide bar at 90⁰ for box joints and dovetail slots, and 90⁰+8⁰ for cutting dovetail pins

The jig can cut workpieces up to 6" wide.

The box frame provides for a rigid frame for the V-rails and associated V-bearings (4 for $14 on eBay). The ½” MDF frame is assembled with ½” Al angle and machine screws; the screw holes are drilled a little oversized so the fit and alignment of the carriage plate and V-bearing can be adjusted resulting in the carriage plate being square with the bottom of the frame, and no wobble of the carriage as it moves along the rails.

The slides below show the details of the jig. In use, the DRO (Igaging, Amazon) is used to accurately position the carriage and attached workpiece according the the desired dimensions. For box joints with uniform spacings, this is pretty simple; for dovetail pins and slots, I make a diagram as shown in Figs 7 and 8. Thankfully, all you need is simple arithimetic to determine dovetail dimensions -- no need to dust off those trigonometric brain cells!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts
Wow, way better than anything I have. Like Neville said, a video would be great.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HoweA

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Stark,

Please allow me to be the first to say "WELCOME TO THE ROUTER FORUMS!"
I see this is your first post. I also noticed that you didn't offer a first name - no problem, but let me warn you:
WITH POSTS LIKE THIS YOU'RE GOING TO BECOME VERY POPULAR!
My wife and I got a Black Belgian Malinois - fresh from being trained for her handicap needs. He was 14 months old and weighed about 45 pounds.
HE DID NOT HAVE A NAME! From the very start, we knew he was going to be a "keeper", so she named him "Jericho".

Your contraption pictured herein is SUPER COOL! Very creative and several great ideas built into one compact machine!

I'm an inventor (that's what I do for a full-time occupation) and have products sold world-wide. You have a real "keeper" here!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,956 Posts
Welcome to the forum, I hope to see more of your work.
A lot of thought and time went into that device, thanks for posting, it seems to produce very good joints.
Herb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,032 Posts
Welcome to the forums. You've made some instant friends and you'd make more with the requested video but I'd be tickled pink with plans....just saying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
When I conceived this jig, I had reviewed Sandor Nagyszalanczy’s description for a table saw jig for dovetails (Table Saw Dovetail Jig - Woodworking | Blog | Videos | Plans | How To). I actually built this jig, but was not happy with the results though – too much eyeballing for my tastes. I then looked at Matthias Wandel’s jig (Table saw dovetail joint jig) and James Hamilton’s router table jig at Dovetail Jigs and decided to see if I could combine some aspects of these two into one jig. So as with most things, the my jig is not entirely original, but was inspired by others.

So you really want a video, right? Never done that, so I will see if I can recruit someone to help. Could be fun.

Thanks for all the comments on the jig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When I conceived this jig, I had reviewed Sandor Nagyszalanczy’s description for a table saw jig for dovetails (Table Saw Dovetail Jig - Woodworking | Blog | Videos | Plans | How To). I actually built this jig, but was not happy with the results though – too much eyeballing for my tastes. I then looked at Matthias Wandel’s jig (Table saw dovetail joint jig) and James Hamilton’s router table jig at Dovetail Jigs and decided to see if I could combine some aspects of these two into one jig. So as with most things, the my jig is not entirely original, but was inspired by others.

So you really want a video, right? Never done that, so I will see if I can recruit someone to help. Could be fun.

Thanks for all the comments on the jig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,007 Posts
Welcome to the Forums, starkw1. Very ingenious device. I would also like to know if there are plans forthcoming in the near future?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No plans or CAD files, but I do have some powerpoints that have most of the dimensions. Send me a private email and I can get them to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
I don't think I've said this before to you, so Welcome to Router Forums.

Please take the time to fill out your profile. Access to do this is by clicking on "Edit Profile" just below your Login at the upper right of your screen. After you do this and tell us more about you, doing this will then display your name on the left of your posts instead of the N/a that we see now. We like to use first names here. Again, welcome, for now N/a. The effort that you have put into making this jig already tells me that you are going to fit right in here.



Your jig looks very interesting, but I have a question. Whenever I've tried to cut box joints or dovetails with a router bit, chip out has been a significant problem on both the front and back sides of the cut, because the router bits are cutting in both directions. My Leigh D4R requires a rough cut, then a final cleaning out cut for each tail cut to minimize tear out and no good way exists to minimize it on the pin cuts. I didn't see where your jig has any provision for sacrificial strips to provide this "zero clearance" to keep the edges of each cut from chipping out. Have you provided for sacrificial strips, or is there some other way included in your design to eliminate this chipping out?.

For now, I'm sticking with my Leigh D4R for dovetails and my Incra I-Box jig on my Unisaw for cutting box joints. I can get perfect cuts and no chipping out with the I-Box jig, even when cutting plywood. My table saw only cuts in one direction, so only one sacrificial strip is needed, and it's included in the design of the Incra I-Box jig. The cutting process provided by Leigh, if followed, for the D4R keeps chip out to a minimum, but it would be better if a sacrifical strip or something could be provided to minimize it further.

Charley
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I place a sacraficial piece of material behind the workpiece which greatly reduces tearout on the back side. Your are right tho, there is still some tearout on the front side, especially with soft wood; much less with, say, maple or oak.

Also, I am considering making a video of the jig in action. Luckily, my Canon Rebel SL2 shoots video, but I have no experience editing so it might take a while to put it all together. Stay tuned.

Thanks for your interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I made a video of the jig in action as some of you suggested.

Go to Youtube and search on Router Table Jig for Cutting Box and Dovetail Joints


Should be near the top of the list


Feedback appreciated.

Enjoy



Warren
Lost Lake Woodworks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
I made a video of the jig in action as some of you suggested.

Go to Youtube and search on Router Table Jig for Cutting Box and Dovetail Joints


Should be near the top of the list


Feedback appreciated.

Enjoy



Warren
Lost Lake Woodworks



looks great

 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top