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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Traded quite awhile back for a nice Delta 40-450 scrollsaw. Getting in the shop is an issue at times, so wanted to at least do some scrollsawing in the house, because I knew that wouldn't make huge amounts of sawdust, and figured I could rig something up to collect it, without a lot of hassle. So started googling.

Found a lot of stuff that would be a real hassle to make, as well as costing. And a bunch of stuff for sale, that cost way more than I wanted to spend. Plus, didn't look like most of the stuff wouldn't really do that great. Then found the second video in the link below, then found the link, with more videos, of other machines. Great, should work just fine, and the cost to make is about zero, except for having to get a shop vac. I have some excellent ear muffs, so shop vac noise will be no bother.

Being able to cut out my masters, and pieces to be routed, will really help out. In the shop, if I had to go, it was shut everything down, lock the shop, walk to the house, unlock the house, hit the loo, and by that time usually was in no mood to go back to the shop. But by sawing in the house, the loo is only steps away, don't have to lock anything up, or unlock anything, and I can go back in and do some more sawing. Besides the ear muffs, I have a small battery powered air face mask I use. Will likely be a bit of a pain carrying chunks of plywood back and forth, but well worth it.
Shop machine dust extraction improvements
 

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Paul
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Theo, I had to add stuff to my old Delta disc sander in order to be able to collect its dust. What a difference it made though. If I did a bunch of sanding before, I'd get a layer of dust in the whole garage. Now I hardly get any, even right at the sander. It's lucky that my Delta scroll saw (40-570) has a dust collection port because those look fairly complicated to add.
 

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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can use the scrollsaw to cut very close to the line on my patterns. From there all I will need is a bit of careful sanding, and should n't need heaps of that. Being as I will be sanding in the house, some at least, all that will be done by sanding sticks - sandpaper glued to a strip of wood. Any heavy sanding, routing, and all that will be done in the shop.

In the future I may be doing the majority, if not all, my gluing in the house. Gluing in the shop in the cold means the shop has to be heated 24/7, or a gluing cabinet, with heat, made. Gluing in the house means neither would be needed. I don't make huge items that will need gluing, so gluing in the house may prove to a bit of a PITA, carrying the piece back and forth, but it would solve so many issues that it should be well worth the effort.

Tis my thread, so if anyone veers off of the subject, just make sure whatever is interesting.
 

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Getting in the shop is an issue at times, so wanted to at least do some scrollsawing in the house,
I also moved my scroll saw inside, I don't heat my garage 24/7 so I set-up a small temporary work area in the basement.
(last pic) Still need to build a workbench & some tool storage shelves!

Found the second video in the link below, then found the link, with more videos, of other machines.
So which style/design did you end up going with, Any pictures of your set-up?

Traded quite awhile back for a nice Delta 40-450 scrollsaw.
I have a Delta 40-460, basically the same machine but with a two speed motor instead of a variable speed motor.

I built a small customized air compressor that fits under a stand I made for my scroll saw.
The little compressor works good at keeping the cut line clear on the work piece, But I'm looking into ideas for dust collection.

Doug
 

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Theo, all the dust you get from a SS is fine dust. Here is what I do and it works pretty and is cheap. Yeah, buddy, you like cheap. I now have a small box under the table to catch the dust and small cutoffs that go straight down.

 

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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So which style/design did you end up going with, Any pictures of your set-up?
:grin: I went with a new General International, which will take pinned blades also. So I'll be selling the 40-450, which has the special blade changing wrench by the way, those things are really rare. I just flat do not like using pinless blades. Not had time to make a stand yes, but sawed the back off of this chair I made (didn't suit my needs) to convert it to a small work bench, which doe suit my needs; but now will make a base for the saw and fasten that to the now bench. Should work out well. And, if it scoots around because of vibration, will glue a shelf under the top, and add weight, likely sandbags. No pictures of anything yet. The General has a dust port, and I just got a small shop vac, looks like a decent saw, that will answer all my needs.
 

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An old canister vacuum cleaner and a Dust Deputy with a 5 gallon plastic bucket under it will make a very good scroll saw dust collector. You will need the Dust Deputy to keep your vacuum bag clean and the air flowing well. I put the hose end close to where the lower arm connects to the blade and catch most of the sawdust that way. Mine is held there with a couple of tywraps. You likely won't need to dump the 5 gallon bucket for a couple of years and the vacuum bag won't ever need cleaning if you go this way.

The sawdust from the up stroke gets blown by the air puffer to keep the cutting line clear. This tends to blow the above the table sawdust, usually to the right. A 20" square box fan with a pleated filter attached, like @hawkeye10 posted will draw in and catch most of this above the table sawdust.

I used to scroll saw in the house every Winter, but I have a heat pump in the shop now and I haven't done any scroll sawing in the house for over 30 years. Back then I didn't have a vacuum setup like this and just resorted to keeping the door of the room closed while I was sawing, and then I vacuumed the room every time before I quit for the day. In my present shop I use a re-purposed whole house central vacuum unit and a Dust Deputy, but it's mounted on a 20 gallon metal grease barrel. It's been about 2 years since I dumped the barrel, and I scroll saw and teach scroll sawing a lot using 2 scroll saws connected to this vacuum system. I also vacuum the cars and trucks with this same system. I have never needed to clean the filter in the vacuum unit since installing the Dust Deputy. I originally had a 5 gallon bucket for the dust collection and needed to dump it every year. Then my son brought me the metal barrel and I installed it. I made some changes in the system a shot time later and dumped the small amount in the metal barrel, but haven't needed to dump it again, and it's been about 2 years of collecting now, with probably another year or more of capacity left. But to be safe I'll likely be dumping it again soon.

Charley
 

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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
An old canister vacuum cleaner and a Dust Deputy with a 5 gallon plastic bucket under it will make a very good scroll saw dust collector. You will need the Dust Deputy to keep your vacuum bag clean and the air flowing well.
I plan on using the shop vac for regular vacuuming too, so hadn't worried about filling the vacuum bag with sawdust. But that Dust Deputy does look like a good addition. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just found this.
 
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