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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all out there I want to make picture frame moulding. What is available in the hardware store is plain and uninteresting. I thought I can do this using the appropriate Router bits.
Anyone out there experienced this? If so I would like to know more.
 

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Hello Harvey..
welcome to the forums...

how about what tools and machinery do you have at your disposal???
any particular styles you have in mind???
 
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There are bit sets for this purpose. For example Yonico has a 10 piece set for around $115. It will cut all kinds of picture frame profiles, and you can do this on a table saw as well. I make frames for my wife's paintings, and have the same problem finding good material. Almost every commercial piece I buy has a twist on one end that must be discarded. Starting from scratch with wood you cut to length, then rip to a little oversize, will get better workpieces. Here's the site for the bits. These are not likely to last all that long, but can be sharpened for a longer useful life. But if you are only making a few frames, they will last a long time. https://www.amazon.com/Yonico-16101...rame+making+router+bits&qid=1580958550&sr=8-1

Here's a pix of the set. You can buy all kinds of bits to use for this purpose, and you can make multiple passes over several bits for a combination profile. My wife did a very abstract painting not long ago and I was able to makie a very simple frame by cutting an angle on the front edge, a rabbet on the thinner edge, and it turned into a very nice frame. Simple, elegant. Wish now I'd painted it rather than a wood finish.

I also use the Grizzly version of the Lyon Miter Trimmer, pix below, to make perfect corners, and usually put a spline in the corners for strength. The Lyon Trimmer makes perfect 45s. Cut first on a saw, then trim about 1/16 th off each end for a perfect fit.

Frame making is an exacting project.
 

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G'day, Harvey. Welcome to the forum.

What part of the Great South Land, do you call home?
 

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Rick
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Welcome to the forum Harvey . Sorry I can’t help you with your question,but theirs a lot of helpful guys here that will chime in
 

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Theo
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Been thinking about making some picture frames too. Any router bits for one like this?
 

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I've made a few. My wife wanted to frame 2 prints she bought so we went to a frame shop to pick some styles and get the matting done. That's when the sticker shock set in as the moldings were $25 per foot and each frame would need about 8' of molding. While looking at them I realized that most of the curves could be made with common router bits in multiple passes. Here is an example of one of them. https://www.routerforums.com/attach...676205-new-life-dead-router-frame-profile.jpg I think I used a 3/8" diameter bullnose for the very top and after that it was a series of different sized round nose bits. If you take the profiles on frame stock and break them down into individual sections then quite a few can be made with round nose, cove, round over, and ogee bits and occasionally a bull nose (half round profile).

One thing that did help me in making several of the frames was having a router mounted in a horizontal position. One of the problems making all those profiles has is that in a router table you eat away at the wood that sits on the table and keeps the work stable. Having a horizontal or overhead setup keeps the back of the frame material on the table so that the piece is always stable. One work around for that is to leave untouched wood on either side of the piece and saw it off after you are done with the profiles.
 

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Doug
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One easy way is to find a frame in the store you like, and sketch the cross section of it. Then you can use that shape and identify the profiles that are used to create it.

The challenge is determining the order of cuts needed to make the profiles, that's where practice cuts come in.

 

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Good info on the router bits.

But what are you using for "glass"?
real glass or acrylic sheets?
thickness?
a reasonably priced source?? (probably the most important question)

thks
smitty
 

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one easy way is to find a frame in the store you like, and sketch the cross section of it. Then you can use that shape and identify the profiles that are used to create it.

the challenge is determining the order of cuts needed to make the profiles, that's where practice cuts come in.
this might help...

.
 

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Welcome, Harvey...as you can see there are many people with the same interest.

The more you describe your available tools, the greater the detail you will get...

Good luck...welcome...
 

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One other subject to consider once the moldings are made is coloring them. I found that staining the frames a color that didn't conflict with the paints or prints was critical to the overall looks. My go to stain in that situation is made by SamaN, a Quebec, Canada company. Actually they are my go to stain in almost every situation. They call it a stain but I would tend to call them dyes instead and they are water based which makes them easy to use. You can take the base colors and mix them to get one of about 130 possibilities I think.If you click on any one of the colors shown on that page it will take you to another page showing other colors that can be made by mixing in one or more other base colors. The 27 standard colors of Saman This is one of the U.S. suppliers but you can find others on SamaN's website here: https://www.saman.ca/en/contact-us The small bottles of stain will do a surprisingly large amount of wood. I rub it on just like I do all other stains but it can be applied in other ways,
 

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Theo
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I am not interested in making picture frames at this time, but started thinking how to make one. Suddenly realized my first priority would be making the corners perfect; I would not be pleased with corner gaps. Once I got that down pat, I'd get me a batch of about foot long sample pieces, then start seeing what I could do with various router bits. I'd start with what I had, look those over, then buy individual bits you think would work.

As far as staining, now I use acrylic latex for any staining I do. Take a spoonful or two of various colors, thin with water, try on sample pieces, then thin more, or start another batch thinned less. You can make all sorts of custom colors, but if you want to create the same color again later, it would pay to make detailed notes of every batch you make, even if you toss it, so you can easily duplicate colors later. You can also use this as fabric paint, works as well, or better, then store bought, and is lots less expensive. Cost less than wood stain also. There are other things you can use to stain with also, tea, coffee, tobacco juice, nut shells, tree leaves, and all sorts of things more. Can give some lovely results, but I didn't care for the length of time some of it took - tea dried very rapidly, coffee took several days to dry, walnut and hickory nut husks had to soak beforehand, and so on. Very inexpensive tho.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the info. I have ordered some profile bits and have some machinery usual woodworking gear but like the shears for cutting mitres and don't have one of those. The posts are coming so fast I am having trouble sorting them out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I am in Mareeba in the Far North of Queensland up in the Tropics and away from civilisation, well Brisbane, 1700 km and Sydney more than 2000. Cairns is the nearest city but that is just a big country coastal town.
 
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