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I made this baseplate a few years ago based on plans from a book on routers either by Patrick Spellman or Bill Hylton. It consisits of two bronze bushings with an i.d. to match the bolts. The bolts need to be directly in line with the centerl of the bit and an equal distance from the same.
 

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John
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Base plate came out fine looks like it will works well.
As for posting pictures for some reason the software in iPhone or iPad will only post one at time
 

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There are caveats. One must not relax (for a second) the force on the bushings.
And there is no practical way to stop on the north and south scribes.
Moreover, you can't adjust for an offset-mortise.
It's a good exercise in making a base plate but for this reader it's too risky.
 

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Rick
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Lenny , that's clever idea . Thanks for posting :)

Harry , that's also a pretty neat idea using the factory holes
 

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We had a task one time on a job to mortise out hidden door bottoms into a number of solid core doors. The doors were 3' wide X 1 3/4"thick. the mortise was 2 1/4" deep X 3/4"W X 35" long. At the time we were using PC 695 fixed base routers, plunge router were yet to be developed.

We had a solid carbide 1/2"dia. bit X 3 1/2" long. We set up guide rails clamped to each side of the door,extended out with stops at both ends to stop the cut. We made cuts of 1/8" depth on each pass. it took 2 people to do this as one had to hold onto the router with both hands, while the other switched it on and off and held the vacuum hose , like Pat (Quillman), says it is a very precarious setup, and a little tilt one way or the other means disaster. Especially when the bit is extended over 2" beyond the base plate.
Herb
 
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