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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i would like to build my own table saw. now i would to know which size of a motor must i use to make a powerful saw?:)
 

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It depends on what size blade you are planning to use, and what kinds of wood, and cuts you plan.
A 1/2 HP motor might be just fine for small stuff, but you might need a much larger one for bigger cuts. I would think a minimum would be 1 hp. Use the biggest motor you can afford.
 

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Welcome to the forum, Nkomaha.
 

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My 1950's craftsman table saw is 3/4hp and has never slowed down for anything. I had considered making my own at first too and looked at a few plans that involved mounting a circular saw upside down under the table, but in the end decided that I probably wouldn't be able to make as nice of a fence system as I could buy and got my saw for $40 off craigslist.
 

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Nkomaha, If you are building a table saw, there will be numerous considerations needed before you can determine the necessary horsepower for the motor. If you are on the metric system, you might choose a motor that is rated in Newton-Meters, and if this is your case you will need to scour the Internet for a conversion factor. One horsepower is equal to 550 foot pounds per second. Be cautious, though; because some horsepower ratings do not accurately parallel torque - because of the rating system used. As an example, some horsepower ratings are based on an RPM that is unlikely to ever be achieved when the tool is in use.

Even when you have determined a motor to be ideal, kerf width is another factor. Narrow kerfs typically require less energy to cut through a piece of wood - but are also dependant upon proper alignment to reduce drag on the back of a blade. Not knowing your qualifications causes me to say: DO YOUR HOMEWORK - you do not want to be building something that could lead to a disaster! BE SAFE by BEING SMART! GOOD LUCK!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It depends on what size blade you are planning to use, and what kinds of wood, and cuts you plan.
A 1/2 HP motor might be just fine for small stuff, but you might need a much larger one for bigger cuts. I would think a minimum would be 1 hp. Use the biggest motor you can afford.
thank you sir for a puntual reply. you say i use the biggest motor i can afford. i already have a 3hp motor. what i want to know is it ok if i use this one for my project and also what size of a blade must i use?
 

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thank you sir for a puntual reply. you say i use the biggest motor i can afford. i already have a 3hp motor. what i want to know is it ok if i use this one for my project and also what size of a blade must i use?
Are you building the saw for hobby use or as a professional workshop tool?

Will the saw be used for ripping or cross cutting?

If for professional use, I would use a 12" blade.

As has been mentioned before, be VERY careful - the alignment of the fence has to be dead accurate, otherwise you will be creating a killing machine.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Are you building the saw for hobby use or as a professional workshop tool?

Will the saw be used for ripping or cross cutting?

If for professional use, I would use a 12" blade.

As has been mentioned before, be VERY careful - the alignment of the fence has to be dead accurate, otherwise you will be creating a killing machine.......
thank you sir. yes i want to use the saw as a professional workshop tool but am a bit worried when you say this could be a killing machine:
 

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If you are careful and exact when making the saw, especially when it comes to the alignment of the saw arbor, and the fence, you will be fine. A misaligned fence can send a board shooting back at you at terminal velocity.

Every power tool can be dangerous - a table saw maybe a little higher on the list. Use good parts, take care in the building, and take extra care when it comes to getting everything aligned.
 
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