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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Admins......please move this post if it is not supposed to be in this section.


I've been working on a shadow box for a customer.....one of the projects I can show progress pics of.

I've been making a practice box before I make his actual box. The board he wants me to use for his box is Poplar....not a cheap wood but not the most expensive wood either. Still, it cost enough that I decided to buy a piece of pine to use for my practice box.

I found out the 45° setting on my saw is actually a 43.5° which does not make pretty, or tight fitting 45° corners......and that's why I used a practice board first. So tonight I used my digital indicator and found the true 45° setting. Tomorrow I will re-cut the bevels to see if I can get a better fit on 45° bevels.

I like the shape of the frame face. The sides come up to a 45° bevel, then roll into a 1/2" radius and end up sweeping into the glass. Another first for me with this design.....and another reason for making a practice box first.

Nothing has been sanded.....and probably won't be on this practice box.....so don't be too critical yet.....but it will be sanded and nicely blended in (and HOPEFULLY none of the seams will be visible) when I cut the Poplar boards.

Here are some pics of the practice box. I'll post pics of the finished box when it's ready to be delivered.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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I like that, Frank. The bevel on the face frame is a nice touch.
 
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Mike
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Frank everything looks good so far. I'm sure the project will turn out good with the testing you are doing. I also agree that the profile you are using on the face edge works well for the project.

As you have found it is best to check settings with accurate measuring instruments and not depend on the built in quick stops on the power tools.
 
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Looks very good. Thank goodness for the digital gauge, I had to do a lot of measuring and test cuts to get a tight fitting miter. Exact matching of opposite side piece lengths is essential, or 45 degree accuracy is moot.

Technology Antenna Tool

I finally bought a Grizzly miter trimmer, see pix. and after that all the rough edges of the miter joint disappeared. CAUTION: the griz is wicked sharp and I cut my finger on it when I unpacked it. The miter trimmer has two wings to hold the pieces, with a stop block on it. However, the wings are really not very well secured and I no longer use them. I match lengths by putting the pieces back to back. Your fingers can detect differences of a couple of thousandths, so this is pretty exact. I cut very precise 45s, usually on my table saw with a Rockler sled. I cut about 1/8th inch long and use the trimmer to slice about 1/16th off each end, with careful length matching on the second piece. When I trial fit, there are rarely any gaps, and the edges are knife edge perfect.

From time to time, I find a bit of a twist or some other irregularity shows up as a mis-fit. If it's not too bad, I use my secret weapon, Tember Mate, which is a wonderful filler that takes stain and finish just like the wood itself. You buy it to match your wood species. It is extremely fine textured and fills even the tiniest gap. It stays put, doesn't shrink and sands smooth. It is an Aussie product available on Amazon. See pix below.

If there is a slight twist or mismatch after glueup, I will sand it down using a shaped sanding block (Rockler), which greatly eases sanding even the most complex shape. I also use 3M Sandblaster Pro, flexible sanding medium, rarely more than 220 grit. The grit lasts forever and takes only a few strokes to produce a baby smooth surface. It also allows rapid evening out of mis-fit joints. I would not use regular sandpaper for this again.

I know what you mean about not wanting to use the good stuff first, which is why I posted this. Fitting mitered corners is equal parts art and craft, and this is how I save the day when there's a glitch.
 

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The design is good Frank. Part of the problem with the miters might be the blade you are using. The angle doesn't look that bad but it looks like the blade may have been pulled sideways when angling across the grain. I had that problem once and solved it using blade stabilizers. The stabilizers made the blade much more rigid so that it didn't tend to wander back and forth when angling across the grain.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Good job there Frank. Hope you are doing well. Haven't heard from you in a while.

David
David, I have been really busy at my day job. I'm retiring mid-December and my customers are trying to get all they can from me before then. LOL We need to do another lunch or supper gathering.....soon!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, the box is made.....still have some finish sanding to complete. Then I'm going to apply Teak Oil; per the customer's request. I'll post finished pictures when I finish it on Saturday. Here a few pics of the actual shadow box.....the wood is Poplar.
 

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That really turned out well. Looks like you learned a lot from doing the trial run first. That is really handsome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
That really turned out well. Looks like you learned a lot from doing the trial run first. That is really handsome.
Tom, I am really glad I did because it was a teaching/learning experience. I hope to finish it late tonight or early in the morning. The customer's birthday is tomorrow and he'd like to have by then if at all possible. So it's off to the shop I go......
 

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Looks very good. Thank goodness for the digital gauge, I had to do a lot of measuring and test cuts to get a tight fitting miter. Exact matching of opposite side piece lengths is essential, or 45 degree accuracy is moot.

View attachment 360403

I finally bought a Grizzly miter trimmer, see pix. and after that all the rough edges of the miter joint disappeared. CAUTION: the griz is wicked sharp and I cut my finger on it when I unpacked it. The miter trimmer has two wings to hold the pieces, with a stop block on it. However, the wings are really not very well secured and I no longer use them. I match lengths by putting the pieces back to back. Your fingers can detect differences of a couple of thousandths, so this is pretty exact. I cut very precise 45s, usually on my table saw with a Rockler sled. I cut about 1/8th inch long and use the trimmer to slice about 1/16th off each end, with careful length matching on the second piece. When I trial fit, there are rarely any gaps, and the edges are knife edge perfect.

From time to time, I find a bit of a twist or some other irregularity shows up as a mis-fit. If it's not too bad, I use my secret weapon, Tember Mate, which is a wonderful filler that takes stain and finish just like the wood itself. You buy it to match your wood species. It is extremely fine textured and fills even the tiniest gap. It stays put, doesn't shrink and sands smooth. It is an Aussie product available on Amazon. See pix below.

If there is a slight twist or mismatch after glueup, I will sand it down using a shaped sanding block (Rockler), which greatly eases sanding even the most complex shape. I also use 3M Sandblaster Pro, flexible sanding medium, rarely more than 220 grit. The grit lasts forever and takes only a few strokes to produce a baby smooth surface. It also allows rapid evening out of mis-fit joints. I would not use regular sandpaper for this again.

I know what you mean about not wanting to use the good stuff first, which is why I posted this. Fitting mitered corners is equal parts art and craft, and this is how I save the day when there's a glitch.
Tom, I really like Timber Mate and I have used it for a while.
 

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Looks very good. Thank goodness for the digital gauge, I had to do a lot of measuring and test cuts to get a tight fitting miter. Exact matching of opposite side piece lengths is essential, or 45 degree accuracy is moot.

View attachment 360403

I finally bought a Grizzly miter trimmer, see pix. and after that all the rough edges of the miter joint disappeared. CAUTION: the griz is wicked sharp and I cut my finger on it when I unpacked it. The miter trimmer has two wings to hold the pieces, with a stop block on it. However, the wings are really not very well secured and I no longer use them. I match lengths by putting the pieces back to back. Your fingers can detect differences of a couple of thousandths, so this is pretty exact. I cut very precise 45s, usually on my table saw with a Rockler sled. I cut about 1/8th inch long and use the trimmer to slice about 1/16th off each end, with careful length matching on the second piece. When I trial fit, there are rarely any gaps, and the edges are knife edge perfect.

From time to time, I find a bit of a twist or some other irregularity shows up as a mis-fit. If it's not too bad, I use my secret weapon, Tember Mate, which is a wonderful filler that takes stain and finish just like the wood itself. You buy it to match your wood species. It is extremely fine textured and fills even the tiniest gap. It stays put, doesn't shrink and sands smooth. It is an Aussie product available on Amazon. See pix below.

If there is a slight twist or mismatch after glueup, I will sand it down using a shaped sanding block (Rockler), which greatly eases sanding even the most complex shape. I also use 3M Sandblaster Pro, flexible sanding medium, rarely more than 220 grit. The grit lasts forever and takes only a few strokes to produce a baby smooth surface. It also allows rapid evening out of mis-fit joints. I would not use regular sandpaper for this again.

I know what you mean about not wanting to use the good stuff first, which is why I posted this. Fitting mitered corners is equal parts art and craft, and this is how I save the day when there's a glitch.
Yes I know how old this topic is but I have just seen it. I have seen one of those Tom, just never seen one being used. Neat tool. Do they work well and stay sharp on hardwoods?
 

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Yes I know how old this topic is but I have just seen it. I have seen one of those Tom, just never seen one being used. Neat tool. Do they work well and stay sharp on hardwoods?
no worries on how old a thread is...
who says the old ones gotta stay buried...
content revival is always a good thing...
 

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Yes I know how old this topic is but I have just seen it. I have seen one of those Tom, just never seen one being used. Neat tool. Do they work well and stay sharp on hardwoods?
I have a Lion Knife...
they work better than very well and they do stay sharp...
I used mine to make this medallion, china cab and writing desk/chair...

.
 

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