Router Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In my new shop I decided to build a dedicated sharpening station with sink, drawers, counter-mounted grinder and have it next to my bench area so chisels, planes are close and sharpening need not be a chore. I have attached a picture of the raw construction prior to drawers and counter mounted accessories.
 

Attachments

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
You're off to a great start there Dave. Most people don't give sharpening it's due. My chisels and plane blades are sharp enough when I can shave the hair off the back of my hand or arm. What kind of gear are you going to set up on it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Nicely done David! That floor is so nice looking I wouldn't trust myself to grind over it though...:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,988 Posts
Cool place for a sharpening station! I gotta say it looks very nice for a shop bench, floor, etc. I'm hoping you will have some kind of nice non-slip and absorbent floor covering in the immediate area - otherwise slip and fall doesn't mix well with chisels, plane irons, etc.
Since your name doesn't "ring a bell" and I believe you to be a new member to the Router Forums, I would like to welcome you into the group. You will have fun here - sharing and learning and making new friends along the way!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Sharpening Station Comments

Thanks everyone for your comments. The bench top will have a grinder complete with polishing wheel. Beside the sink I will have a series of norton wet stones and rough diamond stone. Don't be misled by the "shiny" floor. I chose to start with an oak floor so I would do away with fatigue mats. I consider them as dangerous items as it's possible to trip over them. The oak floor is finished in non skid waterlox. Over time it will dull down and that is fine with me. I have tested it with loads of sawdust to see if I can create a slippery condition. I can't and that is a big improvement over the slippery effect I used to get on concrete when it got covered in dust. I just finished punching 6 inch ducts through my basement wall to allow my cyclone dust collector to sit outside the shop in the garage to keep the noise down in the shop. I then ran 6 inch ducting back into the shop leading to the second stage filter (avoiding negative pressure in shop for basement water heater etc)
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Sounds like you have given this a lot of thought. Well done. Some recent articles I've read say that you should have HEPA filtration in your secondary if you want to eliminate the most dangerous particles that go down to 0.3 microns. Which means I need to redo my system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Charles - I actually have tertiary filtration!! The cyclone separator followed by the secondary filter. Then I also have a ceiling mounted hepa filter. Perhaps this is belt & suspender, too-much safety? I don't know, but I don't want dust from exotic woods to give me a reaction that would prevent me from working with wood.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Charles - I actually have tertiary filtration!! The cyclone separator followed by the secondary filter. Then I also have a ceiling mounted hepa filter. Perhaps this is belt & suspender, too-much safety? I don't know, but I don't want dust from exotic woods to give me a reaction that would prevent me from working with wood.
No such thing as too much safety unless you spend so much on it there's no money left for woodworking. There were some links to stories about guys who developed lung problems a few months ago. Mostly from working with mdf. I believe it to be much nastier than solid woods.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top